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Conqueror (Conqueror, Book 5) Paperback – 19 Jul 2012

291 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Harper (19 July 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007271158
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007271153
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3.6 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (291 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,017 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in London, Conn Iggulden read English at London University and worked as a teacher for seven years before becoming a full-time writer. Married with three children, he lives in Hertfordshire. Since publication of 'The Gates of Rome', Conn has written a further thirteen books including the wildly successful 'The Dangerous Book for Boys'.

Product Description

Review

The CONQUEROR series:

‘Iggulden is in a class of his own when it comes to epic, historical fiction’ Daily Mirror

‘Iggulden…tells an absolutely cracking story…the pace is nail-biting and the set dressing magnificent’ The Times

‘Iggulden weaves an entertaining tale of this world of men, swords, bows and the call of war and the plains’ Daily Express

‘I felt as if a blockbuster movie was unfolding before me…read the book before Hollywood takes it over’ Daily Express

About the Author

Conn Iggulden is one of the most successful authors of historical fiction writing today. His two number one bestselling series, on Julius Caesar and on the Mongol Khans of Central Asia, describe the founding of the greatest empires of their day. Conn Iggulden lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and their children.


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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

91 of 94 people found the following review helpful By Parm TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 Oct. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Review
This for me was a very eagerly anticipated book, but i was never quite sure what to expect. There was always the lead that this book was to be about Kublai Khan, and to a degree it is, but not in the way i expected, and that's not a bad thing, having read so much its not often i'm surprised by an author.

What surprised me most was the whole encompassing picture that Conn Iggulden has managed to cover in this one book, Yes its a 500+ page title, but the ground covered would take some authors 1000+ pages, yet Conn misses nothing, retains the action, retains the depth of detail and quality of writing. If anything was missing it was the wild pace of Wolf of the Plains, but that slowing of pace matches the story, Wolf of the plains is the Wild abandon of Genghis, where as Conqueror is the maturing of a nation, the education and building of Kublai.

What i think pleased me most was learning about new characters from history, Guyuk, Uriang-Khadai, Arik-Boke and Mongke and their actions that led to the creation of the man Kublai Khan, the man the was needed to carve out a place in history, without the actions of the others he may well have been a scholar or a monk and vanished into obscurity, and who knows what would have happened to that part of the world...or the world as a whole?

What thrills me even more is that at the end of the book, there is still at least a whole book if not a whole series still hidden away for Mr Iggulden to come back to, Like the empire series there is no real end, there is just a point in history reached that means the tale is paused.

Conn I for one will be nagging you to come back to this, while i liked the empire series, I have loved the Genghis series, Wolf of the Plains being my favourite book you have written.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By J. Cooper on 23 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover
Conn Iggulden is a master craftsman whose books are truly a world apart from the vast swathes of incomparable imitators who plague the genre. His books are inspirational reads that uplift the reader no end, thrusting you into a forgotten world of bygone civilisations. `Conqueror' is a book of epic proportions and it outclasses similar reads in every conceivable aspect.

When I collected my copy of `Conqueror', I was pleasantly surprised by the length as it extends over 500 pages. Here was a read that I could sink my teeth into and devour. It is one of those books that you could read anywhere and totally switch off from reality. It is also one of those books that you will find completely impossible to put down. The only problem with books of this quality is that they are all too soon completed leaving the reader with a longing ache for more of the same.

`Conqueror' is a tale of politics, leadership, expansion via conquest, brotherhood, warfare, destruction, death, pillage, yet one which subtly reinforces the importance of family, friendship, culture and tolerance. A quick succession of Great Khans leads to the ultimate power struggle between Kublai and his younger brother. Civil war looms and the lesser Khans are forced to choose between their oaths or complete destruction.

In this book, the reader will travel into the lands of the Sung and into the heart of the Islamic world. Different leadership styles lead to very different outcomes for the subjugated peoples and various cultural practices are described quite interestingly by Conn. Vast tacks of land are covered by the ever mobile Tumans and the reader will experience the hardships of travel along with the scouts and Yam riders.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Mark Loughridge VINE VOICE on 16 Sept. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Up til now Robert Harris (especially the Cicerio trilogy) and Bernard Cornwell have been my main exposure to historical fiction. I really enjoy them, love the historical detail, the battle descriptions (Cornwell), and the personality given to the characters.

Fans of Iggulden will know how good he is, but readers of Harris and Cornwell need to know that here is a like-minded, like-gifted exponent of the genre. Maybe I'm just coming late to the party, but I'm glad to get here!

Given that Iggulden was new to me, the book rather on the large side, I was expecting to take a while to get going. No - I was gripped from the start, and held the whole way through. This is superb writing, and a great overview of Kublai Khan. I havent read the others in the series and it didnt detract any from the story line.

There was a point in the book where I wished he would stop switching scenes, but once these scenes and their characters got rounded out I got caught up in the events and enjoyed him developing the storylines in parallel.

There is a map at the start of the book and a family tree, but both of them could do with be a little more detailed, but that takes little away from the overall scope, style and enjoyability of the book.

Top notch - for all fans of this genre of historical fiction.
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104 of 118 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Pailing (Bartlesnipe's Revenge) VINE VOICE on 25 Aug. 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The last book in the "Conqueror" series that I reviewed was "Empire of Silver", and in that I felt that it was weaker than the previous books in the series. This was partly because Ghenghis Khan died at the end of Book 3, and so "Empire of Silver" was dealing with the aftermath. I think the problem, for me, was that the story that Iggulden was trying to tell just wasn't interesting enough, and the characters weren't sufficiently interesting to keep it going. This wasn't Iggulden's fault - he did a good job with a weaker subject.

I am happy to say that with "Conqueror", this fifth book, he is WAY back on form. He is now dealing with the rise to power of Kublai Khan, and the history is much more interesting.

I won't spend loads of time praising Iggulden's writing - he is perfectly competent, as we all know; he knows his history, and he gives us a cracking good yarn. His handling of the battles is very good, and one does end up feeling sympathetic towards the characters.

What makes this book is that the characters are so much more full and rounded. Kublai himself is an interesting character, and seeing his development from a peaceful scholar into a ruthless general makes the story worth telling.

To be honest, however, I did feel that the story slowed a bit in the middle - the first and last thirds were excellent; but I found it just a tad more difficult to bother picking up the book to continue reading in the middle third. But it was worth sticking with it - Part 3 rattled along and kept me hooked (and as I was reading it in the garden I nearly got sunburn as a result!)

I think Iggulden made a good choice ending the book where he does - not least because it was starting to get a bit long.
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