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Congratulations [VINYL]

60 customer reviews

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Music

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Photos

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Biography

MGMT
(The Third MGMT Album)

Andrew VanWyngarden
Ben Goldwasser

* * * * *

Had Andrew and Ben not agreed (probably with a smirk) long ago that, should their ever-evolving musical collaboration called MGMT reach the crucial Third Record Threshold, they'd make that milestone eponymous, MGMT (the album) might well have been called something like Step Into The Club - ... Read more in Amazon's MGMT Store

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for 9 albums, 9 photos, discussions, and more.

Product Features

  • Ships in Certified Frustration-Free Packaging

Product details

  • Vinyl (19 April 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Columbia
  • ASIN: B003956Z98
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 293,115 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. It's Working
2. Song For Dan Treacy
3. Someone's Missing
Disc: 2
1. Flash Delirium
2. I Found A Whistle
Disc: 3
1. Siberian Breaks - Ben Goldwasser, Sonic Boom
Disc: 4
1. Brian Eno - Sonic Boom, Andrew VanWyngarden
2. Lady Dada's Nightmare
3. Congratulations

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By static shadows on 30 Mar. 2010
Format: Audio CD
This album will disappoint a lot of people. Gone are the hit singles, simple melodies, standard song structures, and in are sonic experiments, unpredictable songs, and psychedelia. To say it's a complete departure is I think to have missed many of the undertones of the first album, but it is still a departure.

While many of the vocal melodies are still subtly poppy, the musical background has become a woozy landscape, drenched in very non-commercial psychedelic sounds and production. Actually, it's very reminiscent of the best of experimental 60's psychedelia - 'West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band,' and 'The United States Of America' spring to mind as much as modern psychedelic-pop bands like 'The Flaming Lips' when listening to it. They really have dispensed with the big radio singles (as they said they were going to, and as other reviews here complain about), which is commercial suicide, but that's more than ok with me when they make the music this beautifully detached. It also obliterates the arguments of those who criticised the first album for being simply repetitive, 2-dimensional and irritating. While I really liked the first album I also found it patchy, largely got old quite quickly, and I ultimately stopped listening to it after a few months, feeling as though i'd already exhausted it. However, this album feels like a journey. There's not a bad song on it, and it's grown on me more with every listen. While i'll only ever re-play the odd track on Oracular Spectacular, I think that I may end up playing this album for some time to come, as it offers so much more!

Those who loved the indie-club friendly melodies will be disappointed, but this is an album which should be compared with the likes of The Flaming Lips rather than Lady Gaga, and for me that is no bad thing.
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By P. Smith on 6 May 2010
Format: Audio CD
It's funny really, there appear to be two schools of thought with this record. On the one hand you kinda have the 'how dare they!' and on the other you get the 'why shouldn't they?'. I'm definitely in the latter but worryingly a recent quote from Friendly Fires (last year's next big thing the year before) has them espousing the desire 'not to do an MGMT' with their next record. Huh? I think this sums up just how media and fan friendly (or scared) bands seem to either want to or feel the need to be these days. After the high (or low) watermark of Britpop where indie went seriously overground, the nature of the 'genre' seems more to be about chart positions, sales and dancefloor kudos. The (in some places) terrible backlash against MGMT for reviving a seemingly outdated attitude - that the artist ought to be able to expand, develop and creatively explore - is clear proof of this. Is this really a new thing though?
In a commercially dominant music industry, it's hardly unsurprising but it's not necessarily symptomatic of the major label 'shop or drop' control of the contemporary indie scene. In scarily similar circumstances, Capitol Records failed to promote Pet Sounds, seeing it as too far from the Beach Boys surf-pop formula to be a viable product. Hence it didn't chart in the US. Elektra records signed Arthur Lee & Love as a folk-rock risk that paid off, but ultimately shook their heads in dismay at the expansive and introspective Forever Changes, throwing their weight behind recent signings (at Arthur's behest) The Doors - a good looking frontman and chart friendly psychedelia seeming the better bet here.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Gribby on 17 May 2010
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a sublime offering from MGMT. It takes two or three listens to really get into your psyche, but is more than worth the perciverance. The choruses are as good as anything on the fist album...but this album offers much more depth. Very clever song structures, tempo and key changes galore. Its beautifully, subtle layers reward the listener at every turn. This album will stand out amidst anyones collection.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Alistair Peck on 10 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
There have been some mixed reviews of this album, and I can only assume that those giving it one star because it doesn't sound like Oracular Spectacular never got past the singles and really listened to the rest of that album. Certainly OS was a very tough act to follow, and easily one of my favourite ten albums from over 30 years of music listening. But while Congratulations groans under the weight of expectation of following one of the great debut albums, MGMT seem to have got on with doing what they do best, which is to follow their own direction and instincts without worrying about whether it will please everyone, and that seems to have stood them in good stead so far.

Much like their first album, this contains songs which are an exhilarating hit as son as you hear them, (It's Working is a great opener with its irresistible verses, de facto single Flash Delirium is an adrenaline rush, two acoustic guitar-lead tracks Someone's Missing and I Found a Whistle are in a similar vein to Pieces of What), but much of the rest of the album is less obvious. Siberian Breaks clocks in at 12 minutes and seems to have been too much for some. But it plays like a collection of short songs segued together into a mini song suite, and expands the experimentation and linear structure of the songs at the end of OS, which start in one place and finish in another without the usual verse/chorus structure. From the first five or so listens I feel the album starts to peter out a bit after that, Brian Eno is quirky rather than psychedelic, and the last two tracks slip by without leaving a big impression, which seems a let-down after the compellingly strong sequence that ends OS.
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