Confessions of a Conjuror and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£12.58
  • RRP: £17.35
  • You Save: £4.77 (27%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Basket
Trade in your item
Get a £1.50
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Confessions of a Conjuror Audio CD – Audiobook, 28 Oct 2010


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£12.58
£7.89 £6.99

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Audible.co.uk, an Amazon Company, is home to more than 100,000 audiobook downloads. Start a 30-day free trial today and get your first audiobook for FREE.



Frequently Bought Together

Confessions of a Conjuror + Extracts from Tricks of the Mind + Tricks Of The Mind
Price For All Three: £29.86

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Audiobooks; Unabridged edition edition (28 Oct 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846572606
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846572609
  • Product Dimensions: 14.7 x 12.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (106 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 484,290 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

69 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Dan on 3 Dec 2010
Format: Hardcover
I love this book as I have long been a fan of Derren Brown, and I'm very interested in the way he thinks.This book is entirely comprised of descriptions of his thought processes, insecurities and childhood memories, providing a very personal insight into his life.

Yes, as many negative reviewerss have pointed out, Derren tends to ramble on somewhat, making use of sometimes overlapping multiple-page footnotes, in which he will often go off at several tangents, necessitating a backwards traversal through both pages and thought processes, to find the place at which he left off. But rather than seeming unstructured, I think that this is part of the books charm and appeal.

And yes, Derren uses long words, but again I can't see how that is a negative, unless your vocabulary is somewhat below average. I for one find it refreshing to read a book by a 'celebrity' who has a good command of the English language and isn't afraid to use it. If you find that frustrating, perhaps something like Chris Moyles' autobiography would be more appealing.

If you like Derren's TV shows, but aren't particularly interested in the man himself, or magic/conjuring in general, then you may not get much enjoyment from this book. But if like me, you are fascinated by what goes on in the mind of such a person, then I think you'll find it an enjoyable and interesting read.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Peter Lee TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 9 Jan 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the strangest books I've ever read, and believe me - I've read some strange books.

What this book isn't:
- An autobiography, although much of it is supposedly autobiographical.
- A book about magic, although magic appears in it.
- A "how I do my tricks" book, like his "Tricks Of The Mind" book.
- A TV tie-in.

So what exactly is it? Well, each chapter uses Derren's performance of a card trick as its opening, and then things kind of wander off in other directions, almost like somebody telling you a story and then heading off on tangents, eventually returning to the central strand before veering off once more. It's an amiable ramble, a bit waffly if I'm honest, and full of footnotes, graphs and line drawings to expand upon points mentioned, but by the end I was still confused, wondering what exactly I'd read as I didn't know much more about the man, his work, magic... or anything really, apart from his thoughts on "Monster Munch" crisps, mushrooms, and poached eggs (seriously). In a way it would be a bit like seeing a magician do a trick where he says "pick a card, look at it, don't tell me what it is, and put it back in the deck," before he shuffles the cards, burns the deck, places a glass sculpture of an elephant in front of you and says "I'll let you think about that one," before wandering off. It's enjoyable, but deeply mystifying, and I can't help but wonder if, should I read it again, it would all suddenly click into place and somehow it would all make sense.

Confused? You will be. I enjoyed reading this, despite how confused it left me, but if you want a straight autobiography or a book about what Derren does, or magic in general, you'll be disappointed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
69 of 73 people found the following review helpful By Mr WG Francis on 25 Oct 2010
Format: Hardcover
As befits an illusionist, Derren Brown is himself somewhat of an enigma. He obviously has a very quick mind, and an excellent grasp of human behaviour and how to manipulate it. As a performer, he offers his audiences an entertaining and potentially transformative experience without, apparently, exploiting anyone. A nice, self-assured man. However, the picture he paints here is of someone rather ill at ease with himself, subject (at least in the past) to compulsions ranging from the incovenient to the downright dangerous, and over-anxious to please. These are truly 'Confessions' (I wonder what other C word he considered before settling on 'Conjuror') and the degree of self-loathing he describes is surprising in a celebrity autobiography.

Not sure why, but I am reminded of Derren Brown's piece on 'Barnum statements' that seem very personal but apply to almost everyone. I am also aware that misdirection must be second nature to him. Perhaps the thing to do is leave the book for a while and then reread it with an eye open for alternative interpretations.

Overall. I think those of us who find Derren Brown interesting as a person - and there are plenty of them - will get most from this book, Anyone wanting to know how he does his 'tricks' should look elsewhere, and I'm not sure it quite stands on its own merits as a piece of writing. I hate to criticise a man who is more self-critical than the harshest of reviewers, but the verbose style, use of extensive footnotes and occasional pedantry can be irritating. Actually, thinking about it, it's reminiscent of Stephen Fry in lots of ways, including the self-revelatory tone, but without his light touch. Having said all that, it is very funny in parts, and Derren Brown IS a nice man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By B. Beamon on 6 Jan 2011
Format: Hardcover
Because I payed considerably more to get this book in the US for christmas, the many reviews had me worried that this book, like a few others I've read, would give me the sinking feeling of disappointment and boredom. Of course this is made worse by an author I not only like, but have enjoyed reading and watching. So I entered the book not with lower expectations, but with a search to find what was so disliked by others. I found that I was once again nearly thwarted my own behavior of reading too many reviews before reading a book. Maybe it's a mistake in marketing, but people seemed to have expected something more straight forward from Derren, which is always a mistake. Even if I had expected something else, I don't know that it would be as annoying as I have read from others reactions.

Of course I cannot say the other reviewers are wrong, because this might not have been what engages them. But I not only was never bored, but can put this book in the page-turner category. A short and fine list among non-fiction in my reading world. More than once or twice I had to smile, knowing exactly what Derren was talking about, and pleased someone put it into words. The weaving around the story of the card trick was perfectly done. The trick itself was interesting and more so from the point of view of the one carrying it out. The pages of footnotes were far from annoying when one realizes that this is just comical or descriptive side story which allows more sight into his world. I didn't understand the frustration in other reviews, as I had no problem picking up where the footnote cut in. The writing itself wasn't as drawn out as I had read, though that could be a result of my own reading taste. If you're on the fence because of negative reviews, my advice is to go ahead and get the book,if you're a fan. Where as Tricks of the Mind is better (as a first read of his two) for those who aren't.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search


Feedback