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Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions: A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord Hardcover – 2 Jan 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 745 pages
  • Publisher: Concordia Publishing House; 2 edition (2 Jan. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0758613431
  • ISBN-13: 978-0758613431
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 18.5 x 4.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 915,089 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Title: Concordia( The Lutheran Confessions( A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord) <>Binding: Hardcover <>Author: PaulTimothyMcCain <>Publisher: ConcordiaPublishingHouse

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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Bookaholic on 12 Nov. 2007
I wished to share my review with my friends in the U.K. and not just those who are Lutheran, but to those who have questions.

I submitted the same review to Amazon U.S.:

"I doubt that I could write a better review of "Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions -- A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord (Hardcover)" by Paul Timothy McCain (Editor) than what is already written by the likes of the Rev. William Cwirla or "rodboomboom" of Dearborn, MI , but I would not go so far as to say what one reviewer has and that is, "The Book of Concord consists of the establishing theological documents of early Lutheranism. They are still the primary doctrinal statements for most Lutherans today." The Book of Concord (BoC) contains those arguments, proven from Scripture, that evidence confessional Lutheran Christianity, or as I would prefer, The Church of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession as that which adheres to Scripture, The Word of God and not the rationalism of man. It is not so much a question of it being consistent of establishing documents of "early" Lutheranism, but those documents, inclusive of the early Creeds, that show the proper direction of Christianity as opposed to some of the teachings of Rome and those of the other European Reformations (note that Reformations is plural) of the Church then and now. One also has to wonder about the assertion that "They are still the primary doctrinal statements for most Lutherans today" when so many in various synods have turned their back upon these confessions and symbolics whether in the U.S. or elsewhere and use in their title the term "Lutheran.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Paul T. McCain on 11 May 2007
The Book of Concord should be in every Lutheran home. If a person isn't familiar with this book, he'll think, "That old book is just for pastors. I don't have to preach. After working all day, I can't sit down and study in the evening. If I read my morning and evening devotions, that's enough. No, that is not enough! The Lord doesn't want us to remain children, blown to and fro by every wind of doctrine; instead of that, He wants us to grow in knowledge so that we can teach others. - Dr. C.F.W. Walther

Nothing is more important than clearly confessing and bearing witness to the truths of God's Holy Word which reveal the glorious Gospel of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. This is what the Book of Concord is all about. This edition of the Lutheran Confessions will instruct, inspire and educate all who use it and help them learn what it means to be, and to remain, a genuinely confessing Lutheran Christian.

Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions is a remarkable achievement in Lutheran publishing. In 800 beautifully presented pages, the reader will find helpful introductions, insightful notes and annotations, and helpful tools and guides to aid reading and comprehension. The dramatic history and heroic persons associated with the various documents in the Lutheran Confessions are brought to life. There are more than 115 black and white and 31 full-color plates illuminating the text of the Confessions.

The second edition offers several significant improvements including

* An expanded timeline and general index.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 65 reviews
43 of 43 people found the following review helpful
What Does It Mean to be Lutheran? 9 Mar. 2007
By rodboomboom - Published on Amazon.com
How many times have Lutherans heard from their pastors and informed laypeople, "the Lutheran Confessions says this...?"

What they are referring to are the confessional statements gathered over time culminating in 1580 collection entitled: The Book of Concord. This is it in a wonderful, inexpensive, layperson's edition. Thus you have what started it all, The Augsburg Confession and its Apology, then Luther's wonderful works of his smaller and larger catechisms and his beloved Smalcald Articles, as well as what settled the dispute afer his death of what it truly taught, The Formula of Concord. Add to this the vital and interesting Power and Primacy of the Pope by Melanchthon.

It has all the aids which dress it up and provide those who haven't yet studied them (each LCMS pastor has in detail and is ordained and installed based on them) and you have a wonderful tool for the layperson to read, study and digest, and then live from as a guide to his Bible study and understanding. These aids include wonderful drawings, appendixes, bible reference index, glossary, reformation overview. What a value! What a resource!

What I would recommend is that every interested Christian get a copy, not just you Lutherans or wannabe Lutherans. You will be informed as to just what a Lutheran believes about God's Word here.

And for you Lutherans. Buy a copy. Then demand that your pastor offer some Bible Study classes led by him on this various confessions as my congregation has. Right now we have class which has mesmorized and enlightened our people on the Smalcald Articles. We have also had classes on the Larger Catechism, as well as the Augsburg Confession and Forumla of Concord. Of course, we refer to this Book of Concord often in our teaching.

Studying this will open the reader to what the Reformation was all about, and the subsequent historical confessional developments that stem from it. And possibly, it will open some to what I have proposed is a fervent need to what ails us: a Formula of Concord for our time which posits the two competing theologies of the too many doctrines that divide the LCMS and then resolves it from Scripture and the Book of Concord. Just as they did in 1580, we need now.

Buy this! Read it! Give copies as gifts! Demand nicely your pastor provide Bible studies on it! You and Christ's church will be richly blessed!
41 of 41 people found the following review helpful
A Tremendous Resource! 10 Mar. 2007
By WMC - Published on Amazon.com
The Book of Concord, adopted in 1580, is a collection of seven documents, which together with the 3 historic creeds of western Christianity, are the official teaching of the Lutheran churches. It is both an historic reference to the teaching of the Reformation, and for "confessional" Lutheran churches, the standard of Lutheran orthodoxy.

This "Reader's Edition" of the Book of Concord is an unprecedented contribution in the history of English translations of the Book of Concord. The text is a gentle updating of the Dau/Bente translation which appears in the Concordia Triglotta. What makes this book unique are its detailed historic notes and theological commentaries along with helpful timelines, indexes, reproductions of Reformation period art, and very a helpful 52-week reading guide for those who wish to read the entire Book of Concord in a year. This "Reader's Guide" is to the Book of Concord what "study bibles" are to the Holy Scriptures. Even the high quality binding and printing reflect the dignity this book deserves from a Lutheran publisher.

Of course, as some reviewers of this book may indicate, there will be personal disagreements regarding some of the historic and theological notations. This is to be expected; it happens also with study bibles. Opinions and applications are bound to vary, and the authoritative texts of the Book of Concord remain the critical editions of the original Latin and German texts. However, the value of this book is to provide an accessible English translation together with historic and theological notes that allow the reader to see these vital documents of the Lutheran Reformation framed in their original context.

I recommend the Concordia Reader's Edition to anyone interested in learning about the Lutheran confession of the Christian faith and the Lutheran Reformation from its first sources. It should also be owned and studied by anyone who belongs to a "Lutheran" church or is considering joining a "Lutheran" church. It will be useful both for personal study and for small group discussion and Bible classes dealing with doctrine. Our congregation has sold over 50 copies to satisfied customers and is considering giving a copy as a gift to every household received into membership.

This book has my unreserved recommendation.

The Rev. William M. Cwirla, pastor

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church - Hacienda Heights, CA
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
A Necessary Addition to One's Library and Not Just the Lutheran 12 Nov. 2007
By Bookaholic - Published on Amazon.com
I doubt that I could write a better review of "Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions -- A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord (Hardcover)" by Paul Timothy McCain (Editor) than what is already written by the likes of the Rev. William Cwirla or "rodboomboom" of Dearborn, MI , but I would not go so far as to say what one reviewer has and that is, "The Book of Concord consists of the establishing theological documents of early Lutheranism. They are still the primary doctrinal statements for most Lutherans today." The Book of Concord (BoC) contains those arguments, proven from Scripture, that evidence confessional Lutheran Christianity, or as I would prefer, The Church of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession as that which adheres to Scripture, The Word of God and not the rationalism of man. It is not so much a question of it being consistent of establishing documents of "early" Lutheranism, but those documents, inclusive of the early Creeds, that show the proper direction of Christianity as opposed to some of the teachings of Rome and those of the other European Reformations (note that Reformations is plural) of the Church then and now. One also has to wonder about the assertion that "They are still the primary doctrinal statements for most Lutherans today" when so many in various synods have turned their back upon these confessions and symbolics whether in the U.S. or elsewhere and use in their title the term "Lutheran." The term, "Lutheran," was foisted or in other words imposed upon the Church of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession so long past and by others but not by Luther or those adherents to the confessions, e.g. Chemnitz, Gerhard, and closer in our day men such as Walther and Sasse. It was used as a label so to speak and not in a positive sense. If a synod claims to be "Lutheran" and adhere to the confessions and symbolics contained in the "BoC," how can they be in pulpit and altar fellowship with those who deny a goodly portion of its contents or accept some but not all contained therein? I admit that there are those in other churches who believe in their hearts what is in the "BoC" but work from within to tell the truth of Scripture, e.g. Christ's Words, "This is, etc." and not just a "memorial" meal.

I once mentioned, in conversation, "The Book of Concord." Someone overheard the discussion and inquired if I was interested in wines. This was from a person who proudly stated that they were a "life long Lutheran" of a given synod, but had no clue as to what the "BoC" was or that it contained those documents that the historic Church has believed. They were thoroughly confused when I then spoke the Luther's Large Catechism.

Leaving the above paragraph at that, it clearly shows the great need for a "Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord" in language not addressed to the academic alone but to a far wider readership that can learn from it and in an historical context as well. It is to learn from and to teach from as well as to pose questions to the learned in our theology to obtain a better understanding of "Gottesdienst," that is what God gives to us, God's service to us, in His Word and Sacraments whether that be in corporate worship where we gather as believers to make confession of our sins and receive absolution, or what we receive from Him within private and family devotions. God gives in abundance to and through us. McCains "Readers Edition" is essential to not only confessional Lutheranism, but to Christianity period as so many "have the wrong end of the stick" as it where. I pray for learning and not confusion of God's Word to the masses and this "Readers Edition" is a right step in that direction as it is derived of God's Word, "Sola Scriptura," A reader, Lutheran or not, who studies it and compares it to God's Word in both Testaments, will profit from this book. If one questions the doctrines of other denominations, this is a tool to help in both learning and formulating questions if you are not certain. Confusion abounds and "American Civil Religion" would have us believe that that confusion is O.K or that there are "many roads" just that we believe in something. ESV John 14:6 Jesus said to him, "I am the way, and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me." That is one of God's bottom line teachings through His Son, Jesus Christ. He does not say, "Do what you will as long as you're happy or feel good" or some such rubbish. Scripture nor the Lutheran Confessions based upon Scripture divert the meaning of the Words of Scripture. See Scripture and this "Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord" which confess only what Scripture tells us and not a human perversion of what God says. I use "says" for He told us then and now the very same thing. God's Words are for all time and not subject to man's desires to edit to his will over time.

If you can't afford the "Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions -- A Reader's Edition of the Book of Concord (Hardcover)" right now ask to borrow a copy at minimum. But, it still would be best to have a copy for one's self. Some books are a must have, e.g. a truthful translation of Scripture (the Bible)and I would add this one as an important accessory.

For those who ask, "Did you ever question what you believe?" The answer is yes and quite a few decades ago as a young soldier. Soldiering can lead you to question things, even one's own faith. Study of Scripture in depth and the Book of Concord were a God given gift to me. I found that what I had been taught in Sunday School and Church, Catechism classes and post Catechism classes were true to what God has taught us in Scripture. That was a new beginning for me and taught me the lesson that learning in His Word is an ongoing process. There are days when we all slip and fall or find our faith weak for whatever reason. Returning to Scripture and the teachings derived truthfully from Scripture is of the most great import.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Superb Translation -- Unique Features -- Amazing Value 8 Mar. 2007
By Kevin Vogts - Published on Amazon.com
At one time all Lutheran households always had two books: the Bible and the Book of Concord. Sadly, the Book of Concord has lately become less known among Lutheran laity. This is probably because the previous English translations fell into two categories that made them less accessible for the laity. Either they were older translations (such as Bente) which, although doctrinally sound, used archaic language; or they were newer translations intended mainly for academic use in seminary classrooms (such as Kolb-Wengert), and thus translated in a scholarly, stilted manner.

The ambitious aim of this new edition of the Book of Concord is to renew interest in the Lutheran Confessions, particularly among the laity. The translation is doctrinally accurate yet fresh and easy to understand. There are many helpful features you won't find in any other edition of the Book of Concord, including introductory notes, a timeline, and period illustrations. While it is the latest, most up-to-date English translation, it avoids the extremes of "politically correct" gender neutral editing that so mars the Kolb-Wengert translation.

It is also very important to note that a review from last year which states "the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod's Commission on Doctrinal Review has revoked its certification of the first edition" is misleading and no longer applicable. The First Edition was wildly successful and sold out almost immediately, and is no longer in stock. As the Product Details indicates, this IS the Second Edition that is now available. I own both the First and Second Editions, and the changes to the Second Edition are almost entirely in the layout. As the introduction to the Second Edition indicates, the editors at Concordia Publishing House worked closely with the review committee to make a great book even better.

It's not just a coincidence that in the latter part of the 20th century there was a decline in interest in the Lutheran Confessions and a corresponding doctrinal and numerical decline in the Lutheran Church. As we enter the 21st century, we must go "back to the future" and return to our Lutheran roots, as found in the TWO books every Lutheran household should have: the Bible, and this new edition of the Book of Concord.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Concordia: The Lutheran Confessions 14 Nov. 2007
By Alvin Jeske - Published on Amazon.com
I highly recommend this readers edition of the Book of Concord, especially for laymen. At the seminary we used the Triglotta - excellent for study, but large and heavy. Tappert is easier to handle, but especially the German, Latin, English of the Augsburg Confession is awkward. Concordia is a pleasant medium.
Outstanding features include clear woodcuts, editorial introductions clearly offset, easy reading guide, meaningful Reformation Timeline, complete biblical references, extensive subject index, say nothing of the reasonable price - especially the introductory offer.
Concordia was well received by the people of the (vacant) dual parish I am serving - so much so that both congregations ordered copies in bulk so that they might be available for group study.
Rev. Alvin Jeske EM
Browerville, MN
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