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Comrades (DVD + Blu-ray) [1987]


Price: £21.98 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Comrades (DVD + Blu-ray) [1987] + Bill Douglas Trilogy [DVD + Blu-ray]
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Product details

  • Actors: Vanessa Redgrave, Philip Davis, Robin Soans, William Gaminara, Stephen Bateman
  • Directors: Bill Douglas
  • Format: Widescreen, PAL, Dolby, Colour
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French, German
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Bfi
  • DVD Release Date: 27 Feb 2012
  • Run Time: 182 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0078OC0TU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 61,073 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

COMRADES (DVD + Blu-ray)
A film by Bill Douglas

The epic story of the Tolpuddle Martyrs, six Dorset labourers deported to Australia in the 1830s as punishment for their trade union activities.

This rich and compelling account of injustice and heroism, from a director of singular vision and staring Vanessa Redgrave and Phillip David is presented here in a new High-Definition restoration with over two hours of new and archival extras.

Special features

  • Lanterna Magicka Bill Douglas and the Secret History of Cinema (DVD only, 2009, 60 minutes)
  • Visions of: Comrades (2009, 15 minutes):cast-members' recollections (DVD only)
  • News report from the set of Comrades
  • Original Comrades trailer (DVD only)
  • Home and Away (DVD only, Michael Alexander, 1974, 30 minutes)
  • Illustrated booklet with essays, production material, and credits

UK | 1987 | colour | English, with optional English hard-of-hearing, French, Spanish, German subtitles | 182 minutes | Aspect ratio 1.78:1

Disc 1: BD50 | 1080p | 24fps | PCM stereo audio (48k/16-bit)
Disc 2: DVD9 | PAL | PCM stereo audio (48k/16-bit)
Disc 3: DVD9 | PAL | Dolby Digital (320kbps)

Region 0 PAL DVD
Region Free Blu-ray)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Christopher Reeves on 13 Sep 2009
Format: DVD
Bill Douglas always went his own way in making films, caring little for fashion or convention. So the first thing that strikes the viewer of Comrades is the strangeness of the technique - long slow shots, silences, abrupt transitions, and above all, the decision to present the story of the Tolpuddle Martyrs as if it was a sort of lantern-show. But allow the film-maker his licence to work magic - and yes, the magic does work! This piece of cinematography grips and carries you into the experience of these men and their families, especially their sense of being made to feel social outcasts simply for standing up for their basic rights, in a way that few other films succeed in doing.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Mutt on 6 Sep 2009
Format: DVD
Working class filmmaker Bill Douglas followed his much lauded autobiographical trilogy with this British Film Council funded poor man's epic about the Tolpuddle Martyrs and their struggle to establish an early trade union that was a worthy winner of the BFI Sutherland Trophy and a fitting final film for the director.

Soans puts in a strong central performance with able support from Gaminara, Bateman, Davis, Flynn and a roguish Allen, whilst Hordern, Jones, Fox, Windsor, Redgrave and an astonishing debut performance Staunton rounds out the cast and the omnipresent Norton fills in everything else.

The director retells the tale on a grand scale breathing new life into the story with atmospheric locations that perfectly capture rural Dorset and colonial Australia whilst remembering his own place as the story teller, in the form of the lanternist and his bag of tricks, and never loosing the central message of the union movement.

Remember thine end.
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41 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Brady Orme VINE VOICE on 28 July 2009
Format: DVD
The BFI seems to have taken it upon themselves to remind us of our Working-class history this month. Along with Brownlow and Mollo's superlative "Winstanley" (1975), "Comrades" turns our attention to another piece of semi-socilaist history; That of the Tolpuddle Martyrs, seven men who created a "Friendly Society" to protest the lowering of general wages during the early 1830s. Although the Combination Acts of 1824/5 legalised what we would consider to be a Trade Union, landowner James Frampton incurred an old 18th-Century act against illegal oaths to have the men arrested, tried and deported to Australia. The men bar one were released in 1836 and moved to London, Ontario. Their trials and tribulations remain in the forefront of the history of rights in the UK, and they deserve an appropriate film to celebrate them.

So how does Bill Douglas's film stand up to scrutiny? Douglas had already completed his Childhood trilogy ("My Childhood" (1972), "My Ain Folk" (1973) and "My Way Home" (1978)) which put him in good stead to write and direct a working-class hero themed film. And yes, in most aspects the man succeeded. An admirable cast which feature such mainstays as Keith Allen, James Fox and Freddie Jones accurately portray the wronged men, and although the cinematography sometimes degenerates into Chocolate-Box gaudiness (Was it an attempt to do a Terence Malick?) the colours are vivid and the contrast between rainy Dorset and parched New South Wales is masterfully portrayed. And yes, the inevitable Romanticism does ooze through at points in order to stir emotion, it's mostly tastefully done and at a low budget. Bravo.

What of the package? Hell, this is the BFI and they never ever do things in halves (Bless them).
Read more ›
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Baillon on 15 Dec 2009
Format: DVD
Every lover of British cinema, or indeed of the motion pictures, should delight in this magnificent gem. The print is top quality and the accompanying leaflet gives much valuable information about this unique feature film by one of the most intriguing Scottish directors ever. Based on a harrowing episode of nineteenth century labour conflicts in Dorset, it features impeccable acting by a cast of non-professional actors (to portray the working class) while the aristocrats are played by the cream of British actors (Vanessa Redgrave and the like). The mere quality of the photography is dazzling and the editor is none other than Mick Audsley, a regular of Terry Gilliam, Stephen Frears and other equally impressive filmmakers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steve Bridge on 8 Oct 2010
Format: DVD
This was a film in its length mirroring the long struggle for workers' rights. I had never heard of this film until I stumbled across it on Film4. It is a masterpiece in a long line of British period costume drama. The photography is evocative of a time which we can only barely imagine in its harshness. Great film of great men and women. Great history.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. N. C. Baker on 19 Aug 2009
Format: DVD
Comrades is the true story of the Tolpuddle Martyrs. The beginnings of trade unionism in the UK. I had of course always known OF the martyrs but never known their story. They werent literally martyred but the film shows how appallingly they and folks like them were treated and how public shock got their sentences revoked. The film is pretty long but is told in an interesting way using the various developing early animation technologies of the time to link the sections of the story.

The 2 disk set has a lot of extras too, so pretty good value if you are a political person.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Eileen in Duston on 21 Sep 2009
Format: DVD
This is a shocking yet inspiring true story of farm labourers in Dorset in the 1830s. They were paid wages so low that they could barely feed their families,yet when they complained the wages were reduced.Their stories are brilliantly told by Bill Douglas,and the 'extras' include an interview with him,and a good illustrated booklet.They were transported to Australia as punishment for their trade union activities and their sufferings and courage are vividly conveyed.
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