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Complete Symphonies Box set


Price: £44.84 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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£44.84 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Product details

  • Conductor: Evgeny Svetlanov
  • Composer: Mahler
  • Audio CD (7 Dec. 2009)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 14
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Warner Classics & Jazz
  • ASIN: B002IYLEN8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 176,846 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Product Description

I will ship by EMS or SAL items in stock in Japan. It is approximately 7-14days on delivery date. You wholeheartedly support customers as satisfactory. Thank you for you seeing it.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Merksamer Israel on 1 Nov. 2010
A former reviewer complains about the waywardness of russian directors in Mahler.
I, personally, don`t find this interpretation stranger than,say, Bernstein.
The 3rd and 5th are, in my oppinion, among the most interesting.
My only complaint is about the colour of the solo voices. Now I understand what "fruity" means...
Yes, there are more "stellar", performances, whatever that means.
Yes, this won`t be a first choice. But for lovers of Mahler it has a genuine beauty, much more than just curiosity value.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By D. S. CROWE TOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 May 2014
Verified Purchase
The recent emergence of Weitblick recordings on amazon uk prompted me to search further afield for releases unavailable here-a Bruckner 9 from amazon France and a Mahler 9 from the USA both with the fabulous Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and both "monumental" performances are 2 prominent examples, and it was the shattering Mahler recording that prompted me to rectify my decision not to acquire the set under review-just about the only complete set I didn't possess. Originally released on Chant du Monde, the set was remastered and re-packaged by Warner for mainly French release in 2005, and the primary text and minimal notes are in that language-but it is the music that counts!

There is no one complete set by a single conductor that is entirely successful-but in its own terms, this one comes the closest.
You will note the phrase " in its own terms", for this is not the comfortable, well upholstered Mahler of Western Orchestras, but raw edged, exotic sounding musicianship which gives a whole new perspective to these now familiar works, bringing so many of the musical ideas closer to Tchaikovsky that we previously realised.

Svetlanov was Music Director of this orchestra in its various guises for longer than Karajan had the BPO, and though like with Karajan the relationship ended in acrimony, here the understanding that each has for the other is palpable and pays enormous dividends. I will go so far as to say Svetlanov's Mahler is better than his Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninov!

Recorded between 1992 and 1996 in DDD sound, the earliest recordings are the Ninth and Seventh Symphonies.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Monumental music making in a set where for once every performance inspires and delights-great sound too! 2 May 2014
By D. S. CROWE - Published on Amazon.com
The recent emergence of Weitblick recordings on amazon uk prompted me to search further afield for releases unavailable here-a Bruckner 9 from amazon France and a Mahler 9 from the USA both with the fabulous Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and both "monumental" performances are 2 prominent examples, and it was the shattering Mahler recording that prompted me to rectify my decision not to acquire the set under review-just about the only complete set I didn't possess.
Originally released on Chant du Monde, the set was remastered and re-packaged by Warner in 2005 for mainly French release, and the primary text and minimal notes are in that language-but it is the music that counts!

There is no one complete set by a single conductor that is entirely successful-but in its own terms, this one comes the closest.
You will note the phrase " in its own terms", for this is not the comfortable, well upholstered Mahler of Western Orchestras, but raw edged, exotic sounding musicianship which gives a whole new perspective to these now familiar works, bringing so many of the musical ideas closer to Tchaikovsky that we previously realised.

Svetlanov was Music Director of this orchestra in its various guises for longer than Karajan had the BPO, and though like with Karajan the relationship ended in acrimony, here the understanding that each has for the other is palpable and pays enormous dividends. I will go so far as to say Svetlanov's Mahler is better than his Tchaikovsky or Rachmaninov!

Recorded between 1992 and 1996 in DDD sound, the earliest recordings are the Ninth and Seventh Symphonies. In these two works, the strident trumpets, soupy horns and ripe trombones and tubas are at their most pronounced, but as the series progresses these elements mellow, though the sound is always familiarly Russian, but effectively so. The recordings too improve-the early ones ARE excellent, but as the years progressed, the technique improved and this results in some of the most detailed expositions of these symphonies on record, I kid you not. The Eighth, always a challenge, is superb as a recording. The recordings are a mixture of live performances and performances recorded for disc, all made in the Great Hall of Moscow Conservatory, which is wood panelled and gives a warm but resonant acoustic.

Now here's the thing-Svetlanov really "gets" Mahler! The Ninth on this set is far more propulsive than his later 2000 recording, the Seventh is brilliant in every way (though the brass do tire in the live finale and this results in a few blips, but nothing to spoil the enjoyment), the First is superbly atmospheric with a cataclysmic finale-and I could go on....and on... !!!
Special praise is due for the 3rd and 5th. Both are stunning in every way, and the 5th has supplanted the Bernstein VPO as my default first choice-the second movement is the finest I have EVER heard, playing and interpretation.

The 6th is also stunning throughout, though in the finale the thunderous timps rather eclipse the somewhat weak hammer blows.

The Eighth really works as a performance-yes, there is some very "Slavic" solo singing which brings a smile (and just occasionally a grimace) to the face, and though nominally sung in German, with some of the diction it could be Swahili, but no matter-the choirs are superb in the best Russian tradition, the boys choir is caught in perfect balance is the most touching I have ever heard, and Svetlanov delivers an absolutely gripping performance!
There is not one performance where after listening I do not think-"I REALLY enjoyed that!"

It is in a sense a specialist experience-it DOES require adjustment of expectations, it does require the listener to enjoy the unique Russian orchestral sound for what it is-it does sound very odd from time to time- and to compartmentalise it far the VPO or BRSO and it does require the listener not to have preconceived demands of what they want from each work-BUT if you can make these minor concessions, this set will surprise, delight, enlighten and take the listener on a journey through the musical mind of Mahler which emphasises the positive, with ray after ray of shining light illuminating each work, but which also does not shy away from the dark , bitter irony of this genius's music.

All 9 symphonies and the Adagio from the Tenth (tacked on to the second disc of the Seventh) are presented on 14 discs, which I obtained from marketplace uk for less than £3 per disc-it's available for around the same price in the USA.
Whatever it costs, this set may not be an obvious choice for the neophyte, but for dedicated Mahler aficionados I class it as a "must hear." I'm certainly glad I bought it. Recommended with the caveats already expressed. 5 Glorious Stars. Stewart Crowe.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Not "mainstream" bland Mahler 13 Jun. 2010
By J. K. Davis MD - Published on Amazon.com
Hard to picture a Russian conductor (Svetlanov) and orchestra as exponents of Mahler,but here we are. Svetlanov admired Bernstein, especially his Mahler, and so these are fairly intense interpretations, unlike the well-groomed every hair in place style which seems prevalent now. There are some rough spots in the orchestral ensemble playing, and the sound although good is not up to the highest current recording values. It's nice to have this set, as well as either of Bernstein's sets
to enjoy the less temperate style of Mahler performance.
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