The Complete Idiot's Guide to Game Theory and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £2.25 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Complete Idiot's Guide to Game Theory on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Game Theory (Complete Idiot's Guides (Lifestyle Paperback)) [Paperback]

E. Rosenthal
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: £11.43 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Friday, 3 Oct.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £8.49  
Paperback £11.43  
Trade In this Item for up to £2.25
Trade in The Complete Idiot's Guide to Game Theory (Complete Idiot's Guides (Lifestyle Paperback)) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Frequently Bought Together

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Game Theory (Complete Idiot's Guides (Lifestyle Paperback)) + Game Theory: A Nontechnical Introduction (Dover Books on Mathematics) + Prisoner's Dilemma: John Von Neumann, Game Theory and the Puzzle of the Bomb
Price For All Three: £33.61

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 362 pages
  • Publisher: Alpha Books (1 Mar 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 161564055X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1615640553
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 18.8 x 2.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 83,200 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rosenthal's Game Theory 24 April 2011
By KP
Format:Paperback
Rosenthal has written an excellent book. It covers a lot of ground, but is truly accessible to the non-mathematical reader. To my surprise, avoiding mathematics does not detract from the message. The carefully constructed numerical examples more than make up for it.
In the first place, I want to complement the author on the range of topics he covers. He starts with the well-known concepts in game theory, such as Prisoner's Dilemma. But he moves on to the most interesting generalisations, such as Nash equilibrium and Pareto optimality. Even more interesting, he addresses topics which are still being actively researched, such as games with incomplete information. Also, unlike some other writers, Rosenthal has also covered cooperative games, which involve sharing of rewards.
Personally, what I found most appealing is the range of applications he discusses. Rosenthal is clearly widely read and his erudition shows through. Voting, auctions, biology as well as many everyday situations all show up all over the book. In particular, I find the examples from evolution theory particularly interesting. Even specialists in these areas who are not mathematically knowledgeable would benefit from reading and understanding the concepts in game theory.
Finally, game theory has a history of dense writing, starting with Von Neumann and Morgensten's unreadable tome. This book goes a long way towards remedying that.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  17 reviews
35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect Information 8 May 2011
By Aryabhata - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Imagine the perfect pound cake, with the just-right mixture of substance and sweetness, moisture and flakiness, crust and interior. The title of my review, Perfect Information, may be an inside joke, being a well-defined term in game theory but it is also an apt description of Ed Rosenthal's engaging introduction to a difficult subject. In most other treatments, Game Theory is presented in a format that is either bone dry, too mathematical, or too superficial. The author, an award-winning teacher and research scholar in the field and the veteran of thousands of classroom experiences teaching Game Theory and related subjects, manages to avoid all these extremes, delivering a text that has the perfect blend of theory, illustrative example, and intuitive explanation.

The Subject: Important with Wide-Ranging Applications
-------------------------------------------
Game theory is an increasingly important discipline that applies mathematics to everyday decision making. It provides important insights into such diverse areas as military strategy, economics, biology and public policy. And its results provide important insights into how humans interact with each other. It provides a theoretical framework for thinking about key issues such as competition vs cooperation, information sharing, and rationality (or its lack) in decision making.

Style and Substance: An Easy Engaging Style with lots of Examples and Case Studies
--------------------------------------------------------
Unlike most other introductions to Game Theory, the book grabs you on almost every page by its liberal use of case studies, examples, and intuition-building discussion of the key concepts. For example the discussion of Prisoner's Dilemma starts off with the prisoners, but then quickly moves the discussion to general applications of the concept, where the "dilemma" comes from, how the players might approach it, and then immediately goes into three case studies or examples - Joint ventures, advertising wars, and bill-splitting among friends. This engaging design makes it both fun to read and amazingly easy to understand the concepts even if you have ADD.

What the book covers
-----------------
The book covers a lot of ground and is oranized into five major topics. The first section, THE Basics, covers the fundamental theory with lots of examples. The second, How Information Affects Games, covers the concepts of perfect and imperfect information. The third, Getting Ahead by Working Together, looks at bargaining, fair division, and cooperation vs. competition. THe fourth, Individual Values vs. the Group, covers the Tragedy of the Commons, Auctions, and mechanisms to minimize moral hazard. Finally, Behavior in Games covers biology in games, utility theory, behavioral decision theory, and behavior in games.

Together, these topics are sufficient to give the serious reader a full grounding in the principles and applications of game theory. It is equally easy to use this book as a reference - to be consulted on a particular topic, since the chapters pretty much stand alone.

Audience: Who is this book for?
------------------------
Although anyone with a curious mind is likely to get something out of this book, there are four groups of readers who will find the book especially useful: certain professionals, students, business decision makers/managers, and armchair philosophers.

- Certain professionals, such as doctors, economists, biologists, political scientists, marketing specialists, advertising executives, public relations experts, traders, and strategists will find this book a refreshing source of very useful information in their field
- Students who are enrolled in MBA or similar programs, business undergraduates, and especially those who have game theory as part of their curriculum should find this book an invaluable tool for building intuition.

- A large variety of professionals and managers are confronted with decisions daily that have an element or flavor of the games discussed in this book. They will find the framework very useful for decision making even if they never cast their specific problems into mathematical form.

- Perhaps the audience that would enjoy the book the most is the intelligent individuals and armchair philosophers of the world. The wealth of real life examples makes the discussion of concepts very real and fun to read.

So, are you a student? A quantitative decision maker? A manager? A curious intellectual? Have you been involved in an auction? Do you follow sports teams and statistics? Do you worry about how to make the world a better place? If any of these apply to you, you will find Rosenthal's book a fun and fascinating companion in your armchair travels.
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rosenthal's Game Theory 24 April 2011
By KP - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Rosenthal has written an excellent book. It covers a lot of ground, but is truly accessible to the non-mathematical reader. To my surprise, avoiding mathematics does not detract from the message. The carefully constructed numerical examples more than make up for it.
In the first place, I want to complement the author on the range of topics he covers. He starts with the well-known concepts in game theory, such as Prisoner's Dilemma. But he moves on to the most interesting generalisations, such as Nash equilibrium and Pareto optimality. Even more interesting, he addresses topics which are still being actively researched, such as games with incomplete information. Also, unlike some other writers, Rosenthal has also covered cooperative games, which involve sharing of rewards.
Personally, what I found most appealing is the range of applications he discusses. Rosenthal is clearly widely read and his erudition shows through. Voting, auctions, biology as well as many everyday situations all show up all over the book. In particular, I find the examples from evolution theory particularly interesting. Even specialists in these areas who are not mathematically knowledgeable would benefit from reading and understanding the concepts in game theory.
Finally, game theory has a history of dense writing, starting with Von Neumann and Morgensten's unreadable tome. This book goes a long way towards remedying that.
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars makes it tangible 10 Mar 2011
By history joan - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I just read "Game Theory" and it is an excellent book.

The balance of math with theory, and the history and commentary is outstanding.

The blending of the history of game theory (and most of it is pretty recent, or is that my age??) and the math is very well done.

The author's commentary and thoughts finally bring game theory out of the world of math to something very tangible which I could understand-- usually I read history stuff.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging and wide-ranging 5 Jun 2011
By Martin Czigler - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
What I like most about this book was the wide variety of applications and the diversity of examples, including examples ripped from recent headlines. Also, I couldn't help but think of immediate applications I'd otherwise never have though of. For example, my company is going through a spasm of voluntary early retirement (offering a bonus) and involuntary layoffs (which don't), but the probability of getting laid off depends on how many other people take early retirement. A lot of strategizing going on right now.

This book does an excellent job of building intuition for the basic game theory cases (zero sum, Prisoner's Dilemma and other non-zero sum games), then guiding the reader to broader and broader situations -- imperfect information and signalling, cooperative games and fair division problems, voting systems, auctions. These cases and their solution approaches are explained clearly and in an engaging style. There are many examples, including several very interesting real-world case studies, for example Blu-Ray vs. HD-DVD, Cuba missile crisis, tobacco advertising, various elections, auctions for transmission rights, Coke vs. Pepsi, and many others. One important theme is that lose-lose situations can sometimes be transformed into something better, for example by building trust among parties.

The last section expands to very wide-ranging and unexpected applications. For example, game theory models are now successfully used by biologists both at the level of individual organisms and of entire populations. Paradoxes of traditional economic behavioural assumptions are addressed, with discussion of both alternative theoretical models and the fascinating results of game theory experiments that test those alternatives.

Credit is given throughout the book to the individuals who developed these ideas, a nice touch that humanizes the field and gives some historical context. There's an excellent list of further resources for deeper investigation.

One thing I learned is that the solution strategies can be quite different for slightly different games. It's rather like solving differential equations -- very different strategies for slightly different problem variants. It's a bit unfortunate since it makes the field seem less elegant, without a simple core solution concept.

It's easier to read this book in paper than on a Kindle. Since later chapters build on concepts and examples introduced earlier, one sometimes wants to quickly jump back to review, and that's still easier to do with a real book where you can flip through pages quickly.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Basic Overview not a lot of math 26 Nov 2012
By BlueFalcon8560 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This is a great introduction to the topic that does not get bogged down in a lot of math beyond simple algebra. The writing is clear and direct and the pace is fast. Examples are clear, if simple, and the author points out areas of complexity. I bought this as an overview and got my monies' worth. My next stop is to look into the math more directly. Highly recommend this book for someone who wants to appreciate game theory.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback