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Commentaries on Living: 1st. Series Paperback – 1 Aug 1985


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Gollancz; New edition edition (1 Aug. 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0575037644
  • ISBN-13: 978-0575037649
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.6 x 1.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,974,999 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 26 Aug. 1998
Format: Paperback
J Krishnamurti's Commentaries on Living are a living testament to the beauty as well as the complexity of life. The peace of the mind which wrote these is almost tangible.
When the source is pure, every drop (as every sentence in this book) leads one to purity.
But approach Krishnamurti with trepidation, as it is too easy to battle verbally with oneself and others after having listened to him with a haughty seriousness.
All he can do is to make you question your own self. That is the beginning. After that, you are on your own, and therefore, free.
Nobody can teach you, but you can get taught by everything.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 Mar. 2000
Format: Paperback
This is a remarkable book. It is actually three books in 88 chapters. Each chapter starts with an absolutely magic description of people in nature. That is the first book. The second book consists of people telling about their problems and comments of Krishnamurti. These comments are very fresh, original and give new insights. They evoke the reaction "why did I never looked at it that way". The third book, the third part in every chapter describes his view of life. This is very difficult to understand. I am not sure I am able or should voice an opinion on this part because it so unique. There are no reference points. It is not a philosophy, it is not a religion, and it is not a spiritual path. From time to time you get the feeling, "I understand", the next moment it is again a mirage. When we look at a beautiful landscape, we can be totally absorbed by the experience of looking. We are not thinking or analyzing. Krishnamurti's idea is that that is the way we should live all the time. He refers to that as "experiencing". As soon as we start thinking or want to achieve something, we will forever be unhappy. Buddha teaches that through concentration and meditation it is possible, by "taming" the mind one can arrive at "experiencing". Krishnamurti totally rejects the need for experience, training and effort. The idea of living without thinking is for me not imaginable. One thing I do not like is that Krishnamurti rejects the wisdom of everybody. Logically, he also totally rejects the idea that people should ever consider becoming his followers or disciples. The risk I see with the book is that people read it as a smorgasbord. Pick up ideas that correspond to those they already have and reject the inconvenient ones. All in all for people with genuine spiritual interests it is a gold mine.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stravinsky on 3 Sept. 2002
Format: Paperback
The book is a series of conversations between the author and the many and varied people from all walks of life who came to him to discuss their problems. Each person's discussion is headed under a new chapter that usually begins with a seemingly unrelated description by the author of a moment he has experienced; a walk through a field, a trip on a plane, observing the cattle in a field etc Through these beautiful and elegant descriptions we gain insight into the extraordinary landscape that is Krishnamurti's mind, observing what it is to live and breathe in a state of meditation, unclouded by thought, opinions or the past. The ensuing discussions enable the reader to perceive Krishnamurti's compassion for humanity, an empathy that enabled him to open doors for people regardless of their background, education or experience, gently teaching them to be aware of how their minds work and how they have ended up being who they are. He leaves each discussion with the generation of a possibility for both the reader and the questioner. A beautiful, elegant and incredibly insightful tome that creates an opportunity for all of us to live greater lives.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 16 reviews
35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
This book contains another world ......... 20 Jun. 2000
By Stephen Dedalus - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
When I first got this book I had absolutely no idea who the man Krishnamurti was or what his life was like. I was simply intrigued by the title of the book. After reading the first two commentaries I began to realize that this wouldn't be like anything I've ever read before. I was reading it through the haze of my own conditioning and I would have dropped the book right there, as nothing was making sense. But something made me want to just read on - I don't know if it is the sheer lyrical beauty of the descriptions in his book or the lure of something that is really true. Whatever the reason, I just could not keep my hands off it after I went on.
It can really be a tumultous experience to suddenly realize that the basis of everything that you have believed in and taken support or refuge in is all false. But once you are over that, you then start looking at life very differently. You just stop running with the mad crowd and you stand aside and ask yourself "What have I been doing with my life so far?" Thats the kind of effect that this book had on me and I cannot imagine that a serious reader will go through this book without wanting to change his life after that.
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Beauty, insight and mystery 24 Mar. 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is a remarkable book. It is actually three books in 88 chapters. Each chapter starts with an absolutely magic description of people in nature. That is the first book. The second book consists of people telling about their problems and comments of Krishnamurti. These comments are very fresh, original and give new insights. They evoke the reaction "why did I never looked at it that way". The third book, the third part in every chapter describes his view of life. This is very difficult to understand. I am not sure I am able or should voice an opinion on this part because it so unique. There are no reference points. It is not a philosophy, it is not a religion, and it is not a spiritual path. From time to time you get the feeling, "I understand", the next moment it is again a mirage. When we look at a beautiful landscape, we can be totally absorbed by the experience of looking. We are not thinking or analyzing. Krishnamurti's idea is that that is the way we should live all the time. He refers to that as "experiencing". As soon as we start thinking or want to achieve something, we will forever be unhappy. Buddha teaches that through concentration and meditation it is possible, by "taming" the mind one can arrive at "experiencing". Krishnamurti totally rejects the need for experience, training and effort. The idea of living without thinking is for me not imaginable. One thing I do not like is that Krishnamurti rejects the wisdom of everybody. Logically, he also totally rejects the idea that people should ever consider becoming his followers or disciples. The risk I see with the book is that people read it as a smorgasbord. Pick up ideas that correspond to those they already have and reject the inconvenient ones. All in all for people with genuine spiritual interests it is a gold mine.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
incomparable 10 May 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Krishnamurti writes simpler, more descriptive prose than Hemingway. These Commentaries are, along with his journals and notebook, the only major works in print (at least that I am aware of, and I am aware of most) that he actually wrote himself; the rest of his books are, of course, compilations of talks and conversations. If you like Krishnamurti and you can get past his constant arrogant belittling of traditional religions, which he knows nothing about, you need these.
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
This book cannot be judged. 26 Aug. 1998
By Harmanjit Singh - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
J Krishnamurti's Commentaries on Living are a living testament to the beauty as well as the complexity of life. The peace of the mind which wrote these is almost tangible.
When the source is pure, every drop (as every sentence in this book) leads one to purity.
But approach Krishnamurti with trepidation, as it is too easy to battle verbally with oneself and others after having listened to him with a haughty seriousness.
All he can do is to make you question your own self. That is the beginning. After that, you are on your own, and therefore, free.
Nobody can teach you, but you can get taught by everything.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Absolute breathless descriptions of nature 17 Jun. 2000
By Dave - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Probably the best of Krishnamurti's descriptions of nature and the world around him. Incredible insights and a way of seeing that ushers you into a world behind the world we perceive. Inspirational and fascinating.
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