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Come Taste the Band [35th Anniversary Edition] Special Edition, Original recording remastered, Extra tracks


Price: £9.07 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Only 14 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
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£9.07 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details Only 14 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Come Taste the Band [35th Anniversary Edition] + Stormbringer (35th Anniversary Deluxe Edition) + Who Do We Think We Are
Price For All Three: £27.07

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Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Oct. 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Format: Special Edition, Original recording remastered, Extra tracks
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B003VBVQKS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 6,951 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Comin' Home (2010 Digital Remaster)
2. Lady Luck (2010 Digital Remaster)
3. Gettin' Tighter (2010 Digital Remaster)
4. Dealer (2010 Digital Remaster)
5. I Need Love (2010 Digital Remaster)
6. Drifter (2010 Digital Remaster)
7. Love Child (2010 Digital Remaster)
8. This Time Around/Owed To 'G' (Medley) (2010 Digital Remaster)
9. You Keep On Moving (2010 Digital Remaster)
10. You Keep On Moving (Single Edit)
Disc: 2
1. Comin' Home (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
2. Lady Luck (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
3. Gettin' Tighter (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
4. Dealer (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
5. I Need Love (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
6. You Keep On Moving (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
7. Love Child (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
8. This Time Around (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
9. Owed To 'G' (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
10. The Drifter (2010 Kevin Shirley Remix)
See all 12 tracks on this disc

Product Description

Product Description

Come Feel the Band is the final original studio album of Deep Purple's "EMI" period to be remastered and features the 'Mark IV' line-up featuring David Coverdale, Jon Lord, Ian Paice, Glenn Hughes and Tommy Bolin. The 35th Anniversary package features the original album remastered, along with the whole album (with 2 previously unreleased tracks) remixed by Kevin Shirley (Iron Maiden production supremo). 

BBC Review

Come their tenth studio album Deep Purple were sounding tired. After seven years and four line-ups, their collective creative energy was just about spent. Nothing that a couple of months in the sun couldn’t have cured, perhaps, but that’s not how the rock machine rolls. When you hit paydirt – as Purple had, and then some – you just keep pushing whatever the cost. As it turned out, Come Taste the Band would be the last Deep Purple album for almost a decade.

It certainly wasn’t meant to be that way. Originally released in 1975, Come Taste the Band heralded the arrival of new guitarist Tommy Bolin. The former James Gang man had been drafted in to replace founding axeman Ritchie Blackmore, who’d finally quit in protest at the increasingly funky, soulful style Purple had been adopting since vocalist David Coverdale and bassist/vocalist Glenn Hughes had replaced Ian Gillan and Roger Glover two years earlier. Bolin’s role was to rejuvenate the band but the results saw them drift further into commercial waters and ever farther from the trademark Purple sound.

Although both the band’s previous two albums, Burn and Stormbringer (both released in 1974), had introduced the aforementioned funk and soul courtesy of Coverdale and Hughes, Blackmore’s continued presence ensured that a certain amount of hard rock meat remained on Purple’s increasingly bare bones. With Blackmore gone, the band completed their transformation into an entirely different beast. Consequently, denim-clad devotees of hard-hitting Purple albums such as In Rock and Machine Head would find little to like.

Offering the likes of driving opener Comin' Home, raunchy blues rockers like I Need Love, excellent vocals from both Coverdale and Hughes and some stellar fretwork from Bolin, Come Taste the Band is far from a disaster, particularly on its own terms. The jazzy interludes and funky breaks which Blackmore had condemned as "shoeshine music" make for breezy easy listening. There’s even a whiff of the sex which Coverdale later made a virtual art form with Whitesnake. As a Deep Purple album, however, it’s underpowered and way too relaxed for its own good. A harmless little sparkler where once there was a ton of TNT.

--Greg Moffitt

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kingcrimsonprog TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 July 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Come Taste The Band; the tenth Deep Purple studio album (and sole release from the short-lived MK4 line up) is truly underrated and misunderstood, although it thankfully seems to have seen something of a critical reappraisal nowadays, thanks in part to this amazing 35th anniversary edition, in addition to growing appreciation for the late guitarist Tommy Bolin.

Right from the off, Come Taste The Band is big, loud and impressive. Opener 'Commin' Home' bursts out of the speakers with pure rock fury, adding back into the band's sound some of the harder and faster rock edge that had been absent from their previous album Stormbringer (which at times can seem like its just 50% Soul/Funk and 50% Quiet Songs/Ballads.)

Come Taste The Band definitely has power and force, but it also has variety. The funk/soul influences that the MK3 band had started using are there in tracks, but there are also more rock orientated numbers, and a few musically exciting pieces like 'The Drifter,' which stray into altogether different territory. 'Owed To G' even has a little of the classical vibe which the band used to play with quite a bit.

One of the standout moments on the album is 'Gettin' Tighter,' which has an absolutely gigantic chorus, which is so energetic and filled with attitude that it puts a huge grin on my face every time I listen to it. It also contains a brake-down of solid funk in the middle, which some fans may object to, but that brake-down is in a very rocking song and this is part of the success of this album, a fusion of the new and the old styles in a dramatic and joyous fashion.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Peter N. Ingleby on 15 Feb. 2011
Format: Audio CD
This is probably the one of the most criminally under-rated albums ever released. If it had been by almost any other band it would have been a monster hit. Unfortunately it was lost under what looked like it was going to be the final collapse of Deep Purple. (How wrong we all were!)
If more people had been prepared to accept that Purple had a future without the mighty Blackmore. If the various members of the band had been able to resist the insidious lure of the seamier side of rock music. If If If....
But forget the ifs and just listen to the music. Like its its two predecessors it's a rock album with a funk edge. In fact it's probably fair to say the Tommy Bolin handles the blend of funk and rock better than Ritchie did.
So if your a Purple fan whose ignored this album or just a fan of rock then do yourself a favour and listen to this album it really is very good.
Just one last point, in spite of everything it's still a Purple album so do your neighbours and your-self a favour and play it LOUD!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Baldman on 6 Jan. 2011
Format: Audio CD
Kevin Shirley is a name that keeps cropping up on various cd's by bands that I like ( a bit like Robert John "Mutt" Lange used to). His remix of this album is simply stunning. To be honest, I wasn't expecting much in the light of the Roger Glover remixes of other DP albums, but I was blown away. I was listening on headphones on Boxing Day night, and smiled for nearly an hour. This is not classic Mk 2 or Mk 3, IMHO it's better, and doesn't sound as dated as some DP albums can. Ian Paice and Jon Lord keep up with the "newbies", Tommy Bolin is superb, Coverdale sounds great and Hughes never sounded funkier. Bonus material is a bit so what - that's why it's bonus!
Original album remaster sounds shiny and new, but it is the Kevin Shirley remix that I want to listen to again.
This is a million miles away from the sound of the first Rainbow album, which presumably is the direction that Blackmore wanted DP to head in.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Arnoud on 25 Oct. 2010
Format: Audio CD
Finally... One of the best Deep Purple albums (others might not agree on that) gets a rework. The new versions sound different with Tommy Bolin's guitar getting a more prominent place in the mix. The single / edited version of "You keep on moving" does not really add anything but the remix is worth the money. If you're used to listen to the original version in the original running order, the new version is disorienting. There are tracks "missing", and where I normally sit quiet, let go a breath and get a drink after "You keep on moving" slowly died away, the music now continues. The 2 bonus tracks on the second CD are not the highlights of the album but hearing the album in a crisp new version was worth the wait. Too bad we did not get more bonus material but maybe there simple was no more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Carlitta Rose on 26 July 2011
Format: Audio CD
It is worth having this Anniversary edition with all the bonus tracks!
Coverdale / Hughes / Bolin really make this album shine with their creativity, being the first band to Funk the Rock! Paice and Lord are excellent as usual. You will probably miss Ritchie Blackmore, but this ia a whole different brand of Deep Purple! Within all the experimentation going on, the band sounds tight, consistent, and grooves very heavily, with funky accents to boot!
Tommy Bolin may be a little more jazzier, whereas Blackmore was more classical; but the whole essence of Deep Purple can be felt thoughout this "Come Taste The Band" period!
And all fans of Hughes / Bolin will be more than just pleased with the outcome of this wonderful 35th Anniversary Edition!
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