£15.35 + £1.26 delivery
In stock. Sold by uniqueplace-uk
Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£15.36
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Empor-online
Add to Basket
£15.37
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: buy smart 24
Add to Basket
£30.64
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: KELINDO³
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Combat Rock
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Combat Rock Original recording remastered, Import

28 customer reviews

Price: £15.35
Only 8 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by uniqueplace-uk.
4 new from £15.35
£15.35 Only 8 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by uniqueplace-uk.

Amazon's The Clash Store

Music

Image of album by The Clash

Photos

Image of The Clash

Biography

The Sex Pistols may have been the first British punk rock band, but the Clash were the definitive British punk rockers. Where the Pistols were nihilistic, the Clash were fiery and idealistic, charged with righteousness and a leftist political ideology. From the outset, the band was more musically adventurous, expanding its hard rock & roll with reggae dub and rockabilly among other roots ... Read more in Amazon's The Clash Store

Visit Amazon's The Clash Store
for 107 albums, 11 photos, discussions, and more.

Frequently Bought Together

Combat Rock + Give 'Em Enough Rope + London Calling
Price For All Three: £26.59

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Import
  • Label: Epic
  • ASIN: B00015TXWU
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  Mini-Disc  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By The Chad Who Loved Me on 30 Mar. 2003
Format: Audio CD
The final official Clash album was their most commercially successful, yet in terms of praise it has little. I think that to understand `Combat Rock' you have to first have been able to appreciate `Sandinista!' While less ambitious than the former album, `Combat Rock' covers styles and ideas pursued through all the bands albums.

`Combat Rock' features those two big hits, `Should I Stay Or Should I Go' and 'Rock The Casbah', while the remainder is often dismissed as disappointing. This disparity is very rewarding through further listening. `Sean Flynn', `Ghetto Defendant', `Red Angel Dragnet' are odd the first time round, and but more idiosyncratic and engaging with each further listen. The album musically embodies the bands strains and problems. The stripped sound production is obviously a result of its recording on the road. Another distancing feature of the album is the generally negative and down-tempo feel. This is in strong contrast to their earlier rebellious and up-tempo aggression on the debut and `Give `em Enough Rope' albums. Apart from the two energising hit singles the material sinks in differently. This makes for a totally new kind of Clash album. `Combat Rock' is the next step from `Sandinista!' yet it has a stronger set of pop tunes and hooks closer to `London Calling'.

All in all the greatest virtue of the set is 'Straight To Hell'. It is possibly the most beautiful and sorrowful song they ever wrote. It's inclusion half way through the running order can upset the mix, especially so since the listener is propelled into 'Overpowered by Funk'. `Combat Rock' is definitely an album for an open mind and is a great last hurrah for Mick and Topper. While it may be the groups most overlooked album, it is still as much a complement since the bands standard was so high.

(As a side note it is worth noting that it's so unjust that 'Know Your Rights' is always left off of other Clash compilations. I love it)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Zigor Aranalde on 14 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
This seems ot divide opinion more than any other Clash album - some see it as a sell out, others as a return to form following the sprawling, flawed Sandinista. Im certainly in the latter camp; i love this record, and certainly believe the criticism levelled at it is wholy unfair: its a "sell out", why? Because it had two hit singles on it? London Calling was hardly Aphex Twin either, was it? Ironically the Clash's attempt to "reign it in" following the musical binging that was Sandinista is where, in my opinion, this album fails. It has a fairly good cross section of musical styles on here, but fails to really sink into any kind of groove due to the genre-hopping combined with its relative (ie for a Clash album) brevity. Strummers lyrics have also deepened on this record - Allen Ginsberg turns up on Ghetto Defendant and its clear on some of the other tracks (Car Jamming, Straight To Hell) that he was an influence on Strummers songwwriting. It came out at a time when the Clash had just broke big (that is Shea Stadium, albeit supporting the Who, big) in America, and i think this is one of the major influences in people who claim this record is commercial. In my opinion, its no more commercial than London Calling or even the first Clash record, which did appear, lest we forget, in 1977 - a time when no punk record could fail.

Probably my third favourite Clash record, which would place it in my top 15-20 of all time. Love it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Merry Terry on 1 Sept. 2006
Format: Audio CD
Following on from the gargantuan and indulgent "Sandanista" the Clash went and got a bit global on us with this album.

There's the standards that are unarguably, irrefutable classics. "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" - a no-brainer guitar riff that is so obviously mesmeric. "..Cashbah" being an eccentric classic with Topper's piano riff carrying it.

However, the real charm of this album lays in it's highpoint - the profound and elegant "Straight To Hell" which stands up as one of the most moving and bizarre tracks they ever put down. Bleak post-'Nam lyrics and a fascinating musical back-drop.

Some pleasant but indecisive noodling towards the end perhaps lets this album down a little from being a full-blown masterwork.

But this remains a defining album and a reminder of what The Clash had about them that so many other bands don't.

Even Travis Bickle pops up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 Sept. 2011
Format: Audio CD
There seem to be many parallels between today and the late seventies. A time of economic depression, a working class trodden down by the conscienceless political rulers and moneyed elite, ethnic tensions simmering, a generation of young people with no future prospects ready to lash out a wave of destruction in the form of riots in protest at the injustices of the world they find themselves in. And the development of a new musical form which encapsulates the passion, the anger and the political stance of the youth. OK, perhaps the similarities end there, as plastic Cowell pop seems to be the hallmark and legacy of this generation, but thirty years ago the social situation gave rise to just such a musical form, Punk. And the prime exponents were the Clash.

In the wake of the grandiloquent failure that was Sandinistas!, Combat Rock is a very different affair. Recorded at a time when Punk had pretty much died the death, the group had moved on musically. This record seems to achieve what Sandinistas! couldn't. Merging their original sound, so full of passion and their political and social awareness with new influences, chiefly funk and to an extent electronica. It is the apotheosis of the band's musical journey, and a tantalising hint of the greatness that might have come if the classic line up had stayed together and recorded another album.

The opener, `Know Your Right's', is pure, unadulterated classic Clash. Social conscience and satire merged with saw tooth guitars and angry, snarling vocals. And after the recent riots and their possible cause who can argue that the lines `you have the right not to be killed, because murder is a crime - unless it is done by a policeman', still have resonance and relevance today?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback