£10.00
  • RRP: £20.00
  • You Save: £10.00 (50%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki ... has been added to your Basket
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 8 images

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage Hardcover – 12 Aug 2014

4 out of 5 stars 231 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£10.00
£7.14 £2.20
Audio Download
"Please retry"
£50.68
Note: This item is eligible for click and collect. Details
Pick up your parcel at a time and place that suits you.
  • Choose from over 13,000 locations across the UK
  • Prime members get unlimited deliveries at no additional cost
How to order to an Amazon Pickup Location?
  1. Find your preferred location and add it to your address book
  2. Dispatch to this address when you check out
Learn more

Great Discounts
Shop the Books Outlet. Discover some great deals on top titles. Shop now
£10.00 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage
  • +
  • The Strange Library
  • +
  • Strange Weather in Tokyo
Total price: £30.07
Buy the selected items together

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.




Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harvill Secker (12 Aug. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846558336
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846558337
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.9 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (231 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 35,356 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"A naturalistic coming-of-age story… sprinkled with strange images and written in a hauntingly mournful key" (Guardian)

"[Murakmi’s] elegant, frugal prose creates a tale of courage and hope as Tsukuru tries to unlock the secrets of his past" (Stylist)

"Critics have variously likened Murakami to Raymond Carver, Raymond Chandler, Arthur C Clarke, Don DeLillo, Philip K Dick, Bret Easton Ellis and Thomas Pynchon – a roster so ill-assorted to suggest he is in fact an original" (New York Times)

"A rich and even brilliant piece of work… Genuinely resonant and satisfying" (James Walton Spectator)

"This is a book for both the new and experienced reader....[it] reveals another side of Murakami, one not so easy to pin down. Incurably restive, ambiguous and valiantly struggling toward a new level of maturation" (Patti Smith New York Times)

Book Description

A mesmerising mystery story about friendship from the internationally bestselling author of Norwegian Wood

See all Product Description

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By markr TOP 500 REVIEWER on 4 Oct. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am big fan of Murakami, and count some of his books amongst the best I have ever read. That sets a high standard for a new novel to be judged against, but I wasn't disappointed. I could hardly put this down - reading it in two or three sittings, until i had finnished, staying up way too late one night to find out how it ends.

As so often with Murakami this book deals with loneliness, redemption, music, food, love and sex. It is compelling, beautiful and utterly captivating.

One of Murakami's best, in my opinion
Comment 12 of 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Peter Lee TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 10 Sept. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'm a huge fan of Haruki Murakami's work, but after the awful (in my opinion) "1Q84" I confess I wasn't really looking forward to reading this. I'm pleased to say that it is a much more enjoyable read, if a less challenging one.

The book opens rather depressingly with Tsukuru Tazaki full of despair as he has no friends. Back in his youth he was one of a group of five friends who were inseparable, but one day the other four ostracised Tsukuru apparently for no reason. He knew that the other four (two girls and two boys) had colours in their names whilst his did not, but surely that couldn't be the reason? He attempts to contact one of his friends to find out more but they simply tell him that he knows the reason already and shouldn't contact them again.

Years later he is on the verge of entering into a relationship but the woman he meets tells him he has issues, and that he needs to find the root cause. He explains about his circle of friends and his isolation from them, and she tells him that he needs to find out why they pushed him out, and that only by doing this will she continue with their relationship. So Tsukuru sets out to contact his old friends and find out the truth.

In many ways it is similar to his earlier work such as "Norwegian Wood", as this is an easy book to read and has a similarly cold atmosphere to it, almost a sterility. It's a bit of a page turner too, especially when Tsukuru starts to find things out, although it is a little repetitive as the latter half of the book is essentially a series of meetings and conversations.
Read more ›
Comment 25 of 29 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
When I first came across Haruki Murakami's works back in 2003 (first Norwegian Wood, then Wind-up BC, then Hard-boiled Wonderland etc etc) my world was blown apart. At the time, I was into authors like Hermann Hesse and Italo Calvino, so my acquired tastes were, while pretty out there, still not quite prepared for Murakami's counter-culture off-kilter beauty and outsider weirdness. There's something about Murakami in particular, and not just Japanese literature in general, which drew me to him. Though one of the big problems for me was translation. I really wanted to find out for myself if what I was reading was really good, or if it was the translator who was really really good. There are significant differences in style between Birnbaum, Rubin, and Gabriel, and it bothered me. I decided in 2006 to travel to Japan, ostensibly as an English teacher, but with the real agenda of mastering Japanese so I could read Murakami in the original. I returned in 2010 having paid my dues. What I'm trying to say with all this is: Murakami has changed my life quite literally. His writings actually compelled me to travel halfway across the globe and stay there for 4 years. Nowadays, I would not say that Murakami is my favourite author. I've moved on. But there is no way I would ever neglect to read any new stories he might publish. I've been burned in recent years. IQ84 was a disappointment to me, as was Kafka on the Shore. I won't say much about those books, except that I was expecting more. I still enjoyed them, and they are still very highly rated by myself, but compare either of those two books to Wind-up Bird Chronicle or Wild Sheep Chase and they fall short. So, when I came to Colorless Tsukuru I was not expecting to be blown away.Read more ›
7 Comments 42 of 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Whilst I think Murakami is a genius, I have to concede that the only book of his I've actually enjoyed reading was Wind-up Bird Chronicle. This one was going so well, I just couldn't put it down; I was enjoying it so much, I was afraid it would turn out to be a disappointment. And a disappointment, it did. Clearly you can leave a book with an ambiguous ending if there's a reason for it, but you just can't stop the narrative when the main character is about to have a meeting that will change his life. And what about the Haida sub-plot, which I kept expecting to reappear? And to be pedantic, boy does he write stilted dialogue (unless that's the translation; or maybe Japanese conversations tend to be more formal?). It had many great points, and as I say, I couldn't put it down - but that ending...!
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki is colourless because that is the meaning of his name, though apparently he really is perceived as rather nondescript, albeit not in a negative way. Tsakuru Tazaki has four school mates, however, who do have rather colourful names - and he is extremely close to them and this delicate unities holds as these young people approach adulthood.

Then, inexplicably and without warning, Tsukuru's friends fail to make contact, when he returns home. The voices of the parents seemed strained as they speak to him on the phone. Finally he is categorically told by one of the males that he is never to contact any one of them ever again, and that he supposedly knows the reason why.

As a student Tsukuru goes into a deep, almost suicidal depression. When he starts work he rarely makes friends with others, nor dates.

When Tsukuru does meet a girl Sara, she recognises that he is damaged, that he should dig into this rejection to find out what is behind it.

So he does. And he does get to the bottom of it.

This novel might well intrigue anyone who has ever reunited with old schoolmates two or more decades later. To see how the young person full of promise, actually did turn out. What each is like now, as a fully-mature adult. For Tsukuru this becomes quite an Odyssey, though he is to encounter tragedy too.

What this novel truly recognises is how significant school friendships can shape in individual long term - and especially how deeply, negative experiences in this area can stay with us.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Look for similar items by category


Feedback