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Coined by God: Words and Phrases That First Appear in the English Translations of the Bible [Hardcover]

Stanley Malless

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Price: £14.13 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

5 Mar 2003 0393020452 978-0393020458 1
Lists 150 English words and phrases that originated in the Bible, including blood money and salt of the Earth, in a volume complemented by meanings and sources as well as chapter and verse identifications.

Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Co.; 1 edition (5 Mar 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393020452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393020458
  • Product Dimensions: 19.2 x 12.9 x 2.4 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,563,380 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Long before college professors missed their campus bookstore deadlines for textbook adoptions, adoption originally appeared in the first English Bible in Romans 8:23, where Paul/Wycliffe says, "We . . . sorrow within us for the adoption of God's son.'' Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

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Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting tidbits 12 Dec 2004
By A. J. Valasek - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
If you find reading dictionaries, reference books or history books fascinating, you may like this little book. It truly is interesting to me how much the English language owes to the realm of religious writing. In all fairness, interesting not fascinating, hence the rating.

The text does not read like a dictionary so it isn't too hard to comprehend and most readers will polish this off in a couple weeks even at a liesurely pace. However, I would classify this book as a reference book since that may be where you find the most use for it and not something you just sit down and read, unless you are a trivia buff of sorts.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars cute and enlightening. and contains SEX! ... 26 May 2003
By Larry Mark MyJewishBooksDotCom - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
McQuain, a former researcher for William Safire's weekly On Language column in The Sunday New York Times, with Mr. Malless, have compiled a book of words in English that first appeared and were coined for the King James English translation version of the Bible. Words like Adoption, Treasure, Appetite, Liberty, First Fruits, Novelty, Nurse, Busybody, Land of Nod, "holier-than-thou", Crime, Cucumber (cucumeres), Ivory Tower, botch, brother's keeper, sex, "coat of many colors", bundle, bloodthirsty, and Sprinkler are included. "Left wing", I had thought came from the French National Assembly. But I was wrong, it was created as a term during the translation of 1 Maccabees 9:16. "Stiff-necked" was also coined for the KJV (Act 7:51). The word "irrevocable", was coined in order to translate a sentence in Ezekiel, derived from Latin for "may not be called back again." The word was also briefly coined for the bible. A fun quick read to review and review for any lexicon irregular.
5.0 out of 5 stars Tremenouse Reference 31 July 2012
By Laurel S. Rogers - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I first checked Coined by God out of the library. However, I quickly realized what an awesome reference it was, both for bible scholars and for wordsmiths as well. Not content to simply peruse the library's copy over and over again, I decided to purchase my own so that I could spend more time with the words and phrases of our language that had their origins with the bible. Also, I wanted it as a reference book as well!
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