Start your 30-day free trial

Code 46 [DVD] [2003] has been added to your Basket
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Buy with confidence from a huge UK seller with over 3 million feedback ratings, all items despatched next day directly from the UK. All items are quality guaranteed.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£3.70
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: figswigs
Add to Basket
£10.00
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: Springwood Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Code 46 [DVD] [2003]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Code 46 [DVD] [2003]


Price: £3.65 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by Love-Your-Books and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
10 new from £2.38 11 used from £0.72

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Code 46 instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post

*Buy Any DVD or Blu-ray and Get £1 Off Amazon Instant Video
Enjoy £1 credit to spend on movies or TV on Amazon Instant Video when you purchase a DVD or Blu-ray offered by Amazon.co.uk. A maximum of 1 credit per customer applies. UK customers only. Offer ends at 23:59 BST on Tues, June 30, 2015. Learn more (terms and conditions apply).
£3.65 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by Love-Your-Books and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Code 46 [DVD] [2003] + THX 1138 - The Director's Cut [DVD] [1971]
Price For Both: £21.44

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Tim Robbins, Samantha Morton, Om Puri, Jeanne Balibar, Essie Davis
  • Directors: Emil Marwa
  • Producers: Joshua Hyams
  • Format: PAL, Anamorphic, Dolby, Digital Sound, Colour
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: 2 Entertain
  • DVD Release Date: 28 Feb. 2005
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0006HCSBQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 74,497 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

How do you solve a crime when the last thing you want to know is the truth?

The near future. Global warming has radically changed the climate. Cloning has become a reality. Without knowing it, people are being constructed using the same DNA. In this future, all citizens must carry identity in the form of a credit card crossed with a passport. Faking these identities is a serious crime against the state.

William (Tim Robbins) is a detective on the trail of an identity fraud. When William finds himself falling in love with his chief suspect, Maria Gonzalez (Samantha Morton) he must choose between his career or a life on the run with the woman he loves....

From Amazon.co.uk

Like Gattacadid before it, Code 46 extrapolates from the present to posit a chilling, dystopian look at our genetically regimented future. In the corporate-controlled, near-future scenario presented by prolific director Michael Winterbottom and his regular screenwriter Frank Cottrell Boyce, nations and languages have merged to form a polyglot society in which genetic imperfections are avoided by the strict enforcement of Code 46, which prohibits sex between people who share 100%, 50%, or even 25% matching DNA. As an insurance-fraud investigator in Shanghai to investigate the issuance of forged passports (a major offense in an overcrowded world), Tim Robbins meets his prime suspect (Samantha Morton, echoing her role in Minority Report), and their violation of Code 46 has tragic and ultimately dehumanizing repercussions. Fascinating as a "what-if" scenario, Winterbottom's film is more successful as a melancholy mood-piece than a science-fiction tale. While the plot and characters suffer from occasionally vague definition, Code 46 offers a fascinating study of human longing in an age of oppressive globalization. --Jeff Shannon

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 3 Feb. 2005
Format: DVD
Visually original and with some fine performances from Samantha Morton and Tim Robbins, Code 46 could probably be forgiven for being a cluttered, and rather confusing mishmash of ideas, themes and genres. The movie uses the cityscapes from the world as it is now, to convey a future of harshly, prohibited genetic matching, where travel is a luxury for those people living "inside," where a person's memory can be wiped in an instant, and where society is controlled by special codified passports called "papelles," which are de rigor for those individuals who want to move through the safe but administered urban zones.
William Geld (a really good Tim Robbins) is an insurance investigator who goes to Shanghai to investigate a factory where counterfeit papelles are being produced. His inquiries cast suspicion on Maria (a frantic Samantha Morton), and the two have a brief, intense affair, and eventually fall in love. In a system which potential parents are screened and unauthorized pregnancies terminated and supported by a technology of selective memory erasure, William and Maria discover that they are not permitted to cohabitate.
William and Maria have both violated code 46; a strictly policed law intended to prevent any accidental or deliberate genetically incestuous reproduction. How William and Maria navigate through these maze of restrictions, and the choices they have to make between comfort and freedom form the thematic core of the movie. It's probably much harder for them to remember their relationship than it is for them to forget it.
It takes about 30 minutes for anything to actually make any sense in this movie.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jalllala on 5 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD
As tedious a film as you`re ever likely to see. I had to force myself to finish it purely because I wouldn`t let it defeat me. Morton phones in a somnambulistic performance and Robbins shoulda known better. Don`t be fooled, as I did, into expecting another Gattaca (brilliant film) and avoid this dullness.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark Pack TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 5 April 2015
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Usually when a film has a mix of reviews, some calling it tedious and others calling it thoughtful, I end up enjoying it. Not this one, alas.

It's very well made, with some powerful acting, a great musical score and a lovely use of huge sweeping urban landscapes from the present to depict the future. Yet the dialogue is often confusing (and hard to follow - making the absence of subtitles annoying), the plot slow moving and the film's promising ideas about genetic manipulation and manipulation of memory remain superficial rather than being fleshed out into substantive points.

The Orwellian future painted is very skillfully done, but what happens against that backdrop is a disappointment.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By You caught me procrastinating again on 20 Nov. 2004
Format: DVD
Alienation is the common thread to so much cinema lately, with this near future pic exploring relationships complicated by genetics; too many clones. Everything here you've seen before, but the montage is so powerful it remains more than fresh. It's an accomplishment that further proves Winterbottom's incredible range and versatility. With extra marks for the soundtrack.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Paul Pinn on 6 May 2007
Format: DVD
The problem with a film like this is that people tend to personalize what they get out of it to such an extent that it's hard for someone who hasn't seen it to know what they are likely to end up watching. Viewers can give a film like this as much or as little depth as they like. And having seen it I don't know what exactly it is I've watched. It is sci-fi, it is romance, it has a touch of the thriller, and a dollop of the mood piece, it is pedestrian yet not exactly plodding. It is a mess, but only in so much that a mixed chow mein might look a mess but is actually enjoyable to eat. However, for me the mix didn't work that well and I grew bored with this film, despite the interesting overseas sets and photography, the competent but not exactly strenuous acting, the reasonable script, and the 'have/have not' and other issues that might be found in the film. I thought those that lived outside the 'system' had more interesting or colourful lifestyles than those in it, who tended to be futuristic versions of the nine-to-five commuting rat racers we see nowadays. That's not saying that one is better than the other, because like this film it's hard to quantify and qualify objectively. I guess like life, this film is whatever you want it to be.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: DVD
You have to hand it to Michael Winterbottom - he is completely determined not to be pigeonholed into one genre, and he is equally as determined to make films exactly as he wants to make them. Both of these are admirable traits but do not always translate to great films and he makes too many 'interesting failures' for my liking.

Code 46 is another of them. Only just. To be brutally honest it's almost a complete stinker that is partially rescued to a certain degree by Samantha Morton turning in a quality of performance that she almost always turns in, but that this film doesn't really deserve. It really feels at times like nothing more than an unwieldy mish-mash of ideas familiar from Blade Runner, Gattaca, Children Of Men and sundry other futuristic tales crossed with the meandering whimsy of Lost In Translation - which doesn't necessarily have to be a bad thing.

However, with a narrative that isn't so much complicated but just not nearly as interesting as it should be, a terribly miscast Tim Robbins, and a real failure to build on the promise of a good first 15 minutes, it just ends up going absolutely nowhere. Basically, turn it off after the Mick Jones cameo.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback