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C'mon

C'mon

11 Apr 2011

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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 April 2011
  • Label: Sub Pop
  • Copyright: 2011 Sub Pop Records
  • Total Length: 45:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B004VC2G64
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,840 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Red on Black TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 April 2011
Format: Audio CD
There is something very odd and perplexing about playing Yuletide albums all year round or on hot sunny days (e.g. - yesterday) but the great "Christmas" album by "Low" the Minnesotan slowcore masters repays regular listens and its fine quality partly reminds you of some of the themes of their new album "C'mon". In essence Low are a band who more than anything else produce the most gorgeous songs. "C'mon" was recorded at an old church in Duluth and is their ninth album in a very long career. It comes on top of this decades renaissance man Robert Plant showcasing two sparkling Low covers on his recent Band of Joy LP (Monkey and Silver Rider) and in doing so generating welcome interest in this critically lauded trio. Who cares if this album doesn't end up on sale in your local supermarket or deliver gold records for the trophy cabinet, what Low do is grace music lovers with the priceless service of producing music you can revere, which can soundtrack your variable life episodes and that can genuinely leave you wanting more.

On this album they have called in Nels Cline the innovative guitarist from Wilco to play on a couple of tracks including "Done" which you suspect may turn out to be one of their greatest songs with its almost 50s classic ballad feel and infused throughout by the trademark heart stopping dual vocals from Alan Sparhawk and Mimi Parker (it goes without saying that bassist Steve Garrington is as sure footed as ever). The album opens with the shimmering "Try to sleep" and you notice immediately the crisp production which enhances all these songs for which we must to thank Matt Beckley, a man best known for his work with the likes of Leona Lewis and Avril Lavigne (he should now be forgiven).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Stagger Lee on 6 May 2011
Format: Audio CD
It is fair to admit that this album was a slow-burning fascination for me. At first and second listens, it did not grab my attention in the way that other records this year have done so. It simply slipped through my consciousness without leaving any discernible trace.

And yet, on third, fourth and fifth listen, this album opens up like a tumescent flower in bloom, leaving the listener in no doubt as to its true majesty. Low have certainly pioneered a unique musical brand in the past but here they refine it to dazzling effect. Try to Sleep is a delicate foray into low-fi indie splendour whilst You See Everything retains the attention through an infectious refrain which haunts the listener. Witches is more bellicose (but only relative to other songs on this album) and reminds the listener of Spiritualised at their most stripped back. Especially Me benefits from arch lyrics which prove impossibly moving and self-deprecating ('But as it stands, We don't have a clue, Especially me and probably you') whilst Nightingale reverts to the light touch motifs of the album opener. The real creative peak of this spell-binding masterpiece though is Nothing But Heart, a kind of Folk/Drone opus, which builds gravitas and momentum from glacially minimalist beginnings. The finishing crescendo of harmonies and heart-rending vocals will not fail to move the listener.

One of the most remarkable things about this album though is the subtle contrast in mood and atmosphere that the band conjure up through both instrument, lyric and vocal tack. You are never quite sure if this is an album of hope, despair, love or hate. It consistently challenges the listener to reflect and re-assess.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By john on 6 May 2012
Format: Audio CD
Another great album from Low. Saw them live in Birmingham and then bought this album on strength of the performance. The songs and performances are great. Favourite track - Nothing but Heart - makes the hairs on the back of your neck stand up. Probably one of their best albums, along with The Great Destroyer and Things we Lost in the Fire. Guns and Drums is pretty good too!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. Lee on 1 April 2012
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Somehow Low almost passed me by. Dazzled by my love for contemporaries Galaxy 500 I never thought I needed Low. How wrong was I? This record just gets better with each spin, and I've spun it a lot. There are some fine and quirky lyrics too ( witches, especially me) but some of the best tracks just repeat a line and build (majesty, nothing but heart). If you like guitars, harmonies, and literate songwriting, look no further. Recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Graham S. Curtis on 6 Nov 2011
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Others will review this in greater depth, but anyone remotely interested in good music should own this. Stunningly beautiful, very haunting, incredibly moving this is a slow burning masterpiece. Let this wash over you and be immersed in sublime melodies and restrained playing that just lets the songs shine.

Easily the best album of 2011.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Leicester Bangs TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 April 2011
Format: Audio CD
Low - C'Mon (Sub Pop)
It's difficult to grasp that Low have been around for almost twenty years. Originally pioneers of the slowcore movement, they changed tack slightly with 2002's "Trust" album, developing a more forceful sound, which appears to have found its natural conclusion on their ninth album, "C'Mon".

It's a truly impressive collection - Alan Sparhawk's controlled guitar distortion and measured voice combine intimately with wife Mimi Parker's backing vocals, while other instruments add detail. On the first track "Try To Sleep" a xylophone gently rains notes over the soporific strains and on "Witches" an elegant lap steel guitar and strangely askew, almost menacing banjo entwine themselves. Parker takes the vocal lead on "Especially Me" and it's a particularly moving piece.

Together with references to shadows and partial awareness, there's an underlying peril present within many of the lyrics, which brings a certain tension. It might just be a feeling, but it does imply there's something being played out on "C'Mon" which isn't instantly fathomable. 9/10.
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