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Closer [CASSETTE]


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Product details

  • Audio Cassette (14 Mar 1989)
  • Label: Wea/Warner Brothers
  • ASIN: B000002LGO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,124,955 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Sep 2001
Format: Audio CD
When i first listened to this album, i spent days with songs like Atrocity Exhibition and Heart And Soul playing on repeat. The music is so well crafted, the lyrics are unbelievable and ian curtis' delivers the whole thing off in a way that is impossible for you not to feel emotionally charged. The change from their early days is evident and i personally feel that it is a change for the better. Sumner's use of synthesizers is atmospheric and Hook's bass playing gets beyond playing chords. The drumming from Morris is tight and gives each song a greater edge. Hell i love all the albums but this is just pure genius... not just by Curtis but by the whole band
The best album of the 80s by far.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Byrdman50 on 16 Aug 2011
Format: Audio CD
This review is for the customer who wondered if there was any big audio upgrade in the latest (and double) CD of 'Closer'. I am aware that it was quite a while ago, when you added your comment to one of the customer reviews. You may well have bought the thing by now.
I shall leave the emotional impressions and memories to others on this occasion. Your reviews are all valid, but Robespierre's question needs answering.
I HAVE just bought the 2CD 'Closer'(cheaply and second-hand). Until I bought the 'Heart And Soul' box around 2000, I had not owned any Joy Division on CD (I am fifty. I bought the original LPs/singles). The box set was just getting less expensive. I think it was given a cheaper reissue at about this time, so the price on the 1997 version took a dip as well. It was this one I bought.
I have just done a side-by-side comparison between the latest 'Closer' and the box set rendition of the same album. Quite revealing, but not for the right reasons. Though a medium-quality hi-fi (using speakers) I find no detectable differences. On headphones (a decent Sennheiser set) I notice maybe a TINY low end boost, very subtle indeed, as it does not change the general sound. This is of course a good thing. There has been no attempt to turn up the volume on this new version. The levels on meters are nigh-on identical. Most pleasingly, the new mastering has not fallen into that 'compress everything' mentality that has blighted many recent remasters (Rolling Stones label Universal remasters - no thanks - I completed my collection with second-hand 90's Virgin remasters). Do however turn the volume down a bit before playing the live disc (or don't). It is LOUD in that way most modern CDs are. Fair play though. As a cassette recording it has no real dynamic range.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By dynamitekid156 VINE VOICE on 13 April 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is probably my favourite album ever made. It's simply beautiful. Recorded shortly before Ian Curtis' suicide in May 1980 - and ironically turning him into an icon to this day - it features the best work Joy Division ever made in this form. New Order, much as they tried, never quite measured up, even twenty-six years later.

Greatly assisted by the genius of Martin Hannett and his breathtaking production, the band are on fine, fatalistic form. Ian Curtis is at his lyrical best, especially on the closer, 'Decades,' but the real star here is Bernard Sumner. Always an underrated guitar player, (check out the messy solos on early Warsaw tune 'Failures') on this album he unleashes screeches, stabs of pure noise and wiry single note lines over the top of Peter Hook's ever-chiming bass. He also does a sterling job sitting at the keyboard, playing the album out with his wistful yet heartbreaking line in 'Decades' closing passage.

This is an extraordinary, exceptional album that's simultaneously depressing due to its circumstance and uplifting due to its beauty. Any New Order fan, or indeed any fan of music, is missing out if they don't purchase this astonishing, chilling example of why Ian Curtis is still missed.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By clarketj@yahoo.co.uk on 3 Jan 2000
Format: Audio CD
Despite their primitive sound, Joy Division were always perfect. They created bleak, austere slices of suffering that reflected a band utterly committed to a post-punk aesthetic of artistic salvation. Closer, their finest forty-five minutes, is simultaneously depressing and uplifting, creating an emotional no-man's land that leaves you feeling empty but enlightened.
The music works by creating simple and nagging melodic lines that dig into your subconscious and remain there like splinters. Each note and drum strike is played with absolute conviction as Ian Curtis half-sings/half-talks over the top with his tales of loneliness and suffering, tempered by a belief in salvation ("If you could just see the beauty/There's things I could never describe").
Some of the band's best songs are here. 'Isolation' manages to sound positive despite its theme of dejection. 'Heart and Soul' is hauntingly beautiful. 'Decades' closes the album perfectly with its glassy keyboard line and solemn vocal delivery. Each song acts as a hymn - a religious exorcism of darkness that leaves nothing but a stark white light in its wake.
It's difficult to find a time to actually 'enjoy' Joy Division, but there's a poetry, purity, beauty and sadness to 'Closer' that is incredibly compelling. Overlook at your peril.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mike Cormack on 1 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD
Whereas Unknown Pleasures was intensely, unremittingly deep and heavy, Closer is more glacial, as though a savage black depression had moved on to the acceptance of suicide. It's hard to view this album in any way other than in the light of Ian Curtis' subsequent death, mere weeks after its recording and before its actual release. Like Nirvana Unplugged, there is a sepulchral, elegantly funereal quality that only makes the album even more poignant. Right from the wonderful cover, the album seems like a sad farewell.

Joy Division meanwhile had progressed musically. They might have started out as an edgy punk band "Warsaw", but their two studio albums show great artistry. Closer shows them working with greater dissonance, disjointed rhythms and broadening their music range, all to great effect.

The opener "Atrocity Exhibition" displays all these features in miniature. The drums keep a lopsided rhythm, the bass follows suit, the guitar plays not chords but fractured electric shards, and the lyrics, from JG Ballard, evoke the darker side of humanity's curiosity. "Isolation" in contrast opens with a surging bass riff, over which a cold synthesiser plays a haunting melody. It's a distant cousin of "Transmission" but very much its own song and really shows how Joy Division have moved on from Unknown Pleasures. "A Means To End" meanwhile is based on a descending bass riff, the lyrics and voice so disconsolate - "I put my trust in you". Though the obvious implication is of betrayal, there's no anger, just resignation, which only adds to the impact of the song. "The Eternal" seems the emotional centrepiece of the album, a slow, processional, dirge-like song that never bores the listener because of its stark monochrome simpicity and the emotional directness of the lyrics.
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