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Climate Change for Football Fans: A Matter of Life and Death Paperback – 1 Sep 2010


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Product details

  • Paperback: 334 pages
  • Publisher: UIT Cambridge (1 Sept. 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1906860351
  • ISBN-13: 978-1906860356
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 876,295 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
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Review

Football supporters will never see the world in the same way after reading this book. Professor David JC MacKay Author of Sustainable Energy - without the hot air Even those flawed souls who find climate change more engaging than football will enjoy this quirky take on how to save the planet. Siobhan Parkinson Author and Ireland's Laureate for Children's Literature James Atkins has done the impossible by making the arcane jargon-rich reality of climate policy & science accessible, understandable and fun. Paul Clements-Hunt Head, United Nations Environment Programme Finance Initiative

About the Author

James Atkins is Chairman of Vertis Environmental Finance, an emissions trading company in Hungary which he established in 1998. He studied modern languages at Cambridge and qualified as a Chartered Accountant with Arthur Andersen. Originally from Cumbria, he has lived in Budapest since 1995. He supports Manchester United, and is married with two children. He writes: "I have been feeding off climate policy for over 10 years, having set up an emissions trading company, Vertis Environmental Finance, Hungary. We trade carbon credits in an artificial market created by the European Commission which aims to encourage industrial companies to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions. During this time I have thought a lot about environmental problems and climate change and what governments and individuals can do about them. I have also written about this in articles and in my blog The Bustard http://www.thebustard.com "In 2009 a friend suggested that I compile the blog entries into a book in order to expand the readership. Not wanting to repeat what had already been written I started reading around the topic. But I found I kept nodding off or flicking idly to the BBC sport website. Books on climate change are the literary equivalent of a nil-nil draw in a lower division on a wet day. Unlikely to attract much of a crowd. Few books on climate change are readable or enjoyable, despite it being an extremely important topic. So I scrapped what I had written and started trying to find a way of making the book more entertaining. Partly through putting dialogue and humour in it, and partly through introducing the parallel of a more interesting subject."

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert K on 7 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
The author, James Atkins, begins the book with an observation: "This is a book about climate change policy, which is one of the most boring topics in the world. So it also includes stuff about football, which is the most exciting topic in the world." In fact, the author pulls off the noteworthy feat of not only making BOTH climate change and football interesting, but doing so in an accessible and readable way.

His down-to-earth style disguises what is obviously a keen intelligence, and there are plenty of thought-provoking ideas packed into the fictionalised narrative. The central premise of the book is that governments' (and mainly Western governments - the developing world is largely overlooked) efforts to combat climate change are nowhere near sufficient to put a significant dent in greenhouse gas emissions. Given the electoral pressures faced by politicians and the capture of policy-making by entrenched interests, there are good reasons to think that government efforts may never be sufficient. Beyond tinkering with marginal tax rates and tweaking carbon prices, the author argues that more fundamental changes - particularly social attitudes and a reorientation away from consumer capitalism - will be required if we are to head off dangerous climate change in the future.

If the book has a weakness, it's in its rather limited presentation of solutions and suggested ways forward. But this is a VERY clever book, and one that climate change newcomers and veterans alike will appreciate. It's also surprisingly moving at an emotional level. Highly recommended. I look forward to a sequel!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By john metzler on 28 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
James Atkins has written a fresh and readable book covering the issues of mass consumption, individual behaviour and climate change policies in the developed world. Neither a dry academic tome nor a depressing screed (and a welcome relief from these), this is instead almost a Socratic dialogue in which the common person is educated on the limitations of current (European) policies and approaches to greenhouse gas emission reductions and the ultimate need for behavioural change. Some interesting ideas are mooted to this end.

Although best suited for newcomers to the issues, it can still be enjoyed by experienced carbon market participants and climate change policy wonks. There is a helpful distillation of the issues in the appendix (at least the climate change issues - some of us still need educaiton on the football side)
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Format: Paperback
I bought this book out of curiosity and expected a pretty dry read on a dry subject. In fact I was completely absorbed from the first page and devoured the whole book over a couple of days.

The book tackles climate change issues in bite-sized chunks and throws them into discussions about the fate of Burnley Football Club. It may sound unlikely but it works.

I thought I was pretty well versed in the carbon emission/global warming debate but I learned more from this book and had several issues greatly clarified. The nonsense of several aspects climate politics is nicely exposed, and the requirements for change are neatly (though frighteningly) quantified.

I have decided that all of the next generation in my family will be getting a copy of this book for Christmas, even though none of them are football fans.
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