Buy Used
£3.58
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Delivery, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Very good overall with light to moderate wear. No dust jacket.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Client/Server Programming with CORBA Objects Paperback – 14 Feb 1997


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£15.82 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:


Trade In Promotion



Product details

  • Paperback: 688 pages
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; 2nd edition (14 Feb. 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471163511
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471163510
  • Product Dimensions: 23.5 x 3.2 x 19 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 5,786,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Java and CORBA are merging in cyberspace. Here′s your complete guide to navigating this previously uncharted territory.

Whether you′re a seasoned Java programmer, a distributed objects expert, or looking to be a little bit of both, Client/Server Programming with Java and CORBA gives you the programming know–how you need to combine these two technologies into workable client/server solutions for the Object Web.

Full of working code, tutorials, and design trade–offs, this one–of–a–kind book:

  • Covers everything from simple ORBs to object activation
  • Uses tutorials and a client/server benchmark to compare CORBA and its competitors—including Java/RMI, Java/DCOM, Sockets, and HTTP/CGI
  • Explains in detail Netscape′s ORB: VisiBroker for Java and shows you how to use Caffeine to write CORBA/Java applications without IDL
  • Provides a Debit–Credit benchmark for JDBC databases used to compare 2–tier vs. 3–tier client/server solutions
  • Includes a Web–based Club Med client/server application using CORBA, Java, JDBC, and applets
  • Shows you how to use CORBA′s dynamic facilities such as callbacks, dynamic invocations, object introspection, and the interface repository
  • Compares the performance of C++ ORBs with Java ORBs
  • Includes a CD–ROM with over 15 Java–based client/server applications

About the Author

Robert Orfali and Dan Harkey are client/server system creators and distributed object consultants for IBM. They also head the CORBA/Java distributed objects master′s program and lab at San Jose State University. They have written numerous bestselling books including The Essential Distributed Objects Survival Guide (Wiley, 1996) and The Essential Client/Server Survival Guide, Second Edition (Wiley, 1996) which won Software Development′s Jolt Award for best book of 1994 in its first edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (COBRA) is the most important (and ambitious) middleware project ever undertaken by our industry. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This great book has a misleading title - don't buy it if you just want to write Java/Corba C/S application, it'll confuse you ! Like most readers I will agree that the authors have done a *great* job in comparing and contrasting in huge depth all the modern distributed computing related platforms and technologies. I wont disagree or repeat other people's opinions about the merits of this book, so I' ll jump to what I did not like (and gave it 3 stars):
- The organisation of the book is not very consistent. At times the book goes into great detail explaining a particular aspect (which is good) and then you find the same material mixed in other chapters explained again. Clearly when this is many pages long is wasting not only paper but your time reading through as well, it could simply be referenced, and the book could be at least 200 pages less. I found the book very interesting but also hard to read and follow.
- The book is a perhaps too theoretical at times. Perhaps this is of interest of ORB developers and not ORB users (application programmers). For instance the book is diving into ORB & POA policies details, explaining exactly what is happening behind the scenes. This might be of interest to very experienced programmers or ORB implementers, but not people who just want some subtle methods of writing C/S programs with CORBA/Java.
- I am sure the in-depth comparison of the technologies a) Has made Micro$oft sad of DCOM (cruel people) and Sun shine drinking coffee. b) Will be THE reference book for managers who make serious decisions about multi-million project investments & perhaps Academics who all wish to compare, compare and compare....
...but is this your interest ?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 24 Nov. 1998
Format: Paperback
If you want a succinct and well-written book on CORBA you will just have to wait for someone to write it! All of the books I have seen on CORBA, so far, have similar shortcomings to this book.
I have tried the example code and some of does work (after a bit of good old-fashioned code hacking). An explanation of how to use some of the supplied free software would be very nice! An entry in an appendix would be sufficient. Simple things like, name and version number of the software, the developers web site, how it should be installed and how it is expected to work. This should be cross-referenced to example code that requires the software.
To be fair to the authors: I concede that they are trying to write about a fast changing subject. Since CORBA is driven by a committee (OMG) it is bound to have lots of "twists and turns" and contradictory ideas within its specification. However, this should have been hidden from us; I don't want to know how they arrive at their decisions and what inter-company politics are going on in the background. Why don't they take a leaf out of their own book and encapsulate all that in a couple of sentences and not an entire book.
What I want to know is (In as few words as possible): 1. How do we use CORBA? 2. A simple explanation of how CORBA works? 3. Where do we go to get CORBA information? 4. A series of simple applications (that work) to illustrate and how we use CORBA in the real world?
Now all those requirements have been satisfied in this book but they have been buried in pages of waffle. So I hope that when edition #3 is published that it will be one third as big and three times as informative.
Alex Hunt
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
I have not read the whole book yet, but I have just wasted 2 days trying to run the first and fundamental example in the book. The book is obviously good for those who want to get an overwiew over the subject, which was why I bought it. But there is no support, patches, errata or anything to help you out in a problem like I have had. The code in the book has probably been updated since the first edition, but the software following is still the same old. So it took me two days to find out that the supplied vbjorb.jar file is too old. So be warned, if you want to compile and run the examples, you need to get a newer version. Fortunately I had an Oracle installation that also has this file, and I was able to replace it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
While I understand the other reviewers comments, this book fulfilled *my* needs very well, and I recommend it to others in the same situation. Coming from a knowledge of single-CPU Java only, it gives an overview not only of CORBA and Java but of the competing technologies. If you only *think* CORBA/Java is the combination for you, this will answer your questions. If you know the answer is Java/CORBA and you want the nuts-and-bolts of how to do it, this book is too long and contains too much extraneous material.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By A Customer on 21 Jan. 1999
Format: Paperback
This book covers too much ground. Great if you want to compare CORBA to RMI to DCOM to sockets, and want an intro to EJB and Java Beans. The CORBA aspects concentrate too much on details of particular APIs and not enough on how to do something. The early examples are rather trivial. The later examples introduce JDBC and 3-tier architecture which is a really important aspect of making use of CORBA . Bottom line: Borrow this book or get your company to buy it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback