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A Clean Kill in Tokyo (John Rain Thrillers) MP3 CD – Audiobook, 11 Feb 2014


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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • MP3 CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; MP3 Una edition (11 Feb. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 148055295X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480552951
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.3 x 17.1 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,624,647 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

A Note On The New Titles

Why have I changed the titles of the Rain books? Simply because I've never thought the titles were right for the stories. The right title matters--if only because the wrong one has the same effect as an inappropriate frame around an otherwise beautiful painting. Not only does the painting not look good in the wrong frame; it will sell for less, as well. And if you're the artist behind the painting, having to see it in the wrong frame, and having to live with the suboptimal commercial results, is aggravating.

The sad story of the original Rain titles began with the moniker Rain Fall for the first in the series. It was a silly play on the protagonist's name, and led to an unfortunate and unimaginative sequence of similar such meaningless, interchangeable titles: Hard Rain, Rain Storm, Killing Rain (the British titles were better, but still not right: Blood from Blood for #2; Choke Point for #3; One Last Kill for #4). By the fifth book, I was desperate for something different, and persuaded my publisher to go with The Last Assassin, instead. In general, I think The Last Assassin is a good title, but in fairness it really has nothing to do with the story in the fifth book beyond the fact that there's an assassin in it. But it was better than more of Rain This and Rain That. The good news is, the fifth book did very well indeed; the bad news is, the book's success persuaded my publisher that assassin was a magic word and that what we needed now was to use the word assassin in every title. And so my publisher told me that although they didn't care for my proposed title for the sixth book--The Killer Ascendant--they were pleased to have come up with something far better. The sixth book, they told me proudly, would be known as The Quiet Assassin.

I tried to explain that while not quite as redundant as, say, The Deadly Assassin or The Lethal Assassin, a title suggesting an assassin might be notable for his quietness was at best uninteresting (as opposed to, say, Margret Atwood's The Blind Assassin, which immediately engages the mind because of the connection of two seemingly contradictory qualities). The publisher was adamant. I told them that if they really were hell-bent on using assassin in a title that otherwise had nothing to do with the book, couldn't we at least call the book The Da Vinci Assassin, or The Sudoku Assassin? In the end, we compromised on Requiem for an Assassin, a title I think would be good for some other book but is unrelated to the one I wrote--beyond, again, the bare fact of the presence of an assassin in the story.

Now that I have my rights back and no longer have to make ridiculous compromises about these matters, I've given the books the titles I always wanted them to have--titles that actually have something to do with the stories, that capture some essential aspect of the stories, and that act as both vessel and amplifier for what's most meaningful in the stories. For me, it's like seeing these books for the first time in the frames they always deserved. It's exciting, satisfying, and even liberating. Have a look yourself and I hope you'll enjoy them.

*********************

Barry Eisler spent three years in a covert position with the CIA, then worked as a technology lawyer and startup executive in Silicon Valley and Japan, earning his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center along the way. Eisler's bestselling thrillers have won the Barry Award and the Gumshoe Award for Best Thriller of the Year, have been included in numerous "Best Of" lists, and have been translated into nearly twenty languages. To learn more, please visit www.barryeisler.com. Or Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter.

Product Description

About the Author

Ex CIA agent Barry Eisler has lived and worked extensively in Japan, and now lives in New York. He earned his black belt in Judo from the Kodokan International Judo centre in Tokyo. Rain Fall is his first novel --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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HARRY CUT THROUGH the morning rush-hour crowd like a shark fin through water. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Sturmar on 8 May 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this book under the top 100 free listing and thought I would give it a try as the reviews seemed promising. Imagine my surprise when I was actually charged £3 to purchase the book which was meant to be free. Ah well I thought!

There are not many books that I fail to finish, I usually manage to get to the end even if it turns out not to be my cup of tea. Sadly, this was one of the few books that I could not endure past it's mid point! The lack of momentum and the incredibly annoying habit of using Japanese words then immediately explaining what the word means was just too much to handle. The book is based in Japan, but that is not really important to the plot as far as I could see. The author clearly wanted to show off their knowledge of Japan and its language rather than keeping the reader hooked. I can understand why the book failed first time around and needed a new name and some re-writes before it started to make some sales.

A real shame and I feel a little guilty 'bad mouthing' someone's hard work, especially when I would not be able to do better myself. Try the book for yourself, you may enjoy it....... it just didn't work for me.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Colin Phillips on 11 Oct. 2010
Format: Paperback
............can you say that about someone's debut novel, I don't know but I felt that the story was very derivative.

Take away the exotic location of Tokyo and your left with a rather unoriginal tale.

Perhaps I have read too many of crime thrillers?

It has the ingredients that should please, the hero is a secret assassin who did dirty ops. in Vietnam, who is also an expert in martial arts, he also has a love of jazz and there just happens to be a beautiful jazz pianist as the heroine, government conspiracies, CIA involvement, plus the Yakuza; what more could one want? Just a hint of originality, perhaps.

There are ample opportuities for our hero to practice his close combat skills but as an earlier reviewer wrote some of the action needs the suspension of your beliefs.

RAIN FALL is the first in a series of John Rain novels, which seems to have been well recieved, I'm not sure that I will be returning to this hero any time soon.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. -p Grenade on 2 July 2008
Format: Paperback
I bought this book based on what I'd heard from various friends, who know that I like Lee Child.

It's basically an excellent action thriller, that's been well-written and comprehensivley researched.

You get a real sense of Tokyo, through the author's eyes and whilst the main character, John Rain is fascinating, the various other characters in the book pique your interest.

If you like Lee Child, you'll love Barry Eisler, easily one of my favorite books / authors.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Craggs on 4 Mar. 2012
Format: Paperback
Barry Eisler's literary career in the UK has been criminally mismanaged.
Any thriller aficionado worth his salt will tell you that John Rain is the best anti-hero to grace the pages of spy fiction since Fleming created Bond,Peter O'Donell gave us the Modesty Blaise franchise and Adam Hall launched us into the world of Quiller.
Eisler's books are a rarity. He succeeds in being highly literate whilst delivering an abundance of thrills in a refreshing style that is both cool and truly original.
Why these books don't top our best seller lists is one of the tragedies of our time but can probably be attributed to a series of marketing blunders that should have Penguin hanging their heads in shame.
First off, some books in the series have different titles in the UK from those in the US. Allways a difficulty in a global market and a technique destined to confuse consumers by making it difficult for them to navigate or understand their chronological order.To get straightened out, you should visit Eisler's own web site that explains all.
Secondly, the UK cover art is so trashy it would make the real target audience run for the hills.
Last but by no means least, some of the books are already out of print and have to be sourced through the secondary market.
With these mistakes in mind, it is little wonder that Eisler has fallen out of love with "legacy publishing" and is now looking at new ways to bring his product to market.
All of that said, the first in the Rain series is still in print and is the perfect place for you to start your relationship with the Jazz loving, single malt coniseur who specialises in hits that present as death by natural causes.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By elephvant on 9 Aug. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
For its genre, this is a well written and pacey thriller about a half Japanese half American assassin. For the most part it mixes well the personal stories of its main protagonists with the larger story of government corruption.

Its also clear the author knows Tokyo inside out, and one of the most enjoyable things about this book was being taken on a kind of tour of the city while the plot of a thriller unfurls around you. These sections usually take place as Rain indulges in elaborate anti-surveillance manoeuvres. These are interesting the first couple of times they happen, but start getting slightly wearing after that.

What's odd about this book (and I'm not sure if it's intentional or not) is that, while Rain is often described as an "anti-hero", he is in fact much more than that. Namely, he is a complete and utter psychopath. I don't mean that in the crazy American Psycho meaning, I mean it more in the cold and clinical sense that he is a man who is utterly unsympathetic to the feelings or emotions of other people. He kills at the slightest provocation and drags Midori (the love interest) through the most tortuous circumstances with barely a murmur from his conscience.

Despite this, you do end up rooting for him and it makes this book an interesting departure from most books of its type.
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