• RRP: £24.99
  • You Save: £2.50 (10%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Classical Thought (OPUS) has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Trade in your item
Get a £0.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Classical Thought (OPUS) Paperback – 23 Feb 1989


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£22.49
£17.58 £1.94
£22.49 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Classical Thought (OPUS) + Think: A Compelling Introduction to Philosophy
Price For Both: £30.19

Buy the selected items together


Trade In this Item for up to £0.29
Trade in Classical Thought (OPUS) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £0.29, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks; 1st Edition edition (23 Feb. 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0192891774
  • ISBN-13: 978-0192891778
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 1.9 x 13 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 285,866 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

an exciting, and rigorous, introduction to the subject which is a delight (Greece and Rome)

a fine volume, a coherent history of Classical thought (Polis)

About the Author

Terence Irwin is Professor of Philosophy at Cornell University

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
This book introduces some of the issues of philosophical interest in Classical thought, in the 1,100 years or so from Homer to Saint Augustine. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

By christine pinchen on 3 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
bought for uni degree not pleasure
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jos Brincat on 18 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book received as anticipated. Will surely help me very much and in a long way in all my Philosophy studies
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
A peculiar and somewhat puzzling book 27 July 2004
By G. T. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
To be honest, I don't quite know what to do with this book. It is somewhat puzzling to me. It isn't a bad book, but it is a peculiar book indeed. It is the first book in a series on the history of western philosophy, but as it's title Classical Thought suggests, there's more here than just philosophy in a strict sense. And there's nothing wrong with that. However, Irwin leaves out some very important stuff in Greek philosophy, and I wonder whether it was worth sacrificing it to be able to broaden the scope of the book. Was it even a necessary sacrifice?

In the 2nd chapter Irwin deals with Homer, Hesiod and the background, one might say, of Greek thought. As Irwin explains in the 1st chapter (the introduction), the starting point is not completely arbitrary. Homer, after all, had a profound influence on all subsequent Greek thought and even philosophy. On the other hand, Irwin leaves out such prominent figures in Early Greek philosophy as Parmenides (who is mentioned only once in the book, during the discussion of St. Augustin), but instead we get to read about the historian Herodotus. Of course, it is perfectly admissible to include Herodotus in a book on classical thought, but I have doubts about doing it at the expense of Parmenides. Irwin has also omitted most of scepticism, as he himself points out in the introduction. Sextus Empiricus and Pyrrhon (thus written in the book) are each only mentioned once in an endnote. Moreover, Empedocles is not mentioned at all. Is it not peculiar that in a book on classical thought, published in a series on the history of western philosophy, the philosopher Empedocles is nowhere mentioned, but the emperor Nero is mentioned three times? Plato's later thought is not discussed nor is there any discussion of ancient logic in the book.

In my oppinion, this book would have benefited greatly if Irwin had added about 25 pages to it; ten or so on the presocratics, ten or so on the sceptics and maybe five on Plato's later thought. I don't know why the editor of the series should refuse to do so. This book is only 288 pages long, whereas Copenhaver and Schmitt's book on Renaissance philosophy (in the same series) is 464 pages long. But even so, I cannot help feel that this is perhaps not the right book to cover antiquity in a series on the history of western philosophy. Perhaps it should have been a book more on hardcore philosophy.

Having said that, I do admit that this book is lucidly written and inviting. It is easy to read and may be of much use to someone wanting quickly to familiarize himself with ancient thought. But as a first introduction to ancient philosophy proper or for a more thorough discussion of any topic in ancient philosophy (whether Irwin discusses it or not) I would have to recommend another book, e.g. Classical Philosophy by Christopher Shield, The Blackwell Guide to Ancient Philosophy or The Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman Philosophy.
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Intro to Classical Philosophy 20 Jun. 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is one in a series of small paperbacks printed by Oxford University Press as part of a history of Western Philosophy. This volume (#1)is a survey of classical philosophy beginning with Homer and Hesiod, covering Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle and continuing to St. Augustine. The aim of this book and this series is to offer an introduction to the main philosophical issues and thinkers of this period. I would recommend it as a good start to someone who was completely unfamiliar with the philosophy of this period. For someone who is looking for more information, this book would not be worth buying. If you were looking for more depth than Copleston's History of Philosophy would be better. Another choice might be the Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman Philosophy. Other than this complaint, I would say that the chapters are clearly written and that the concepts which are discussed are explained in a way that the average reader would be able to understand. Not a bad book to begin with at all!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
T. Irwin is amazing. 1 Oct. 2012
By Ryan J. Ortega - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This text, as the first Reviewer points out, does leave out (rather curiously I must admit) some rather significant figures and issues in Ancient Philosophy. However, as in Irwin's Introductory Readings on Aristotle, this text is more a primer than a study. For anyone interested in a study, see Irwin's texts published by Oxford Press - his Work on Aristotle and Plato is simply unreal and is some of the most exciting writing on Ancient Philosophy that I've ever read.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback