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on 6 October 2013
It is a manual for organizers around the world, from UK to US, from Italy to the West Indies, from Venezuela, to Tanzania. No space for academics/sociologists here. And so ucompromising against careerists with no place for sectarianism either.

Apart from the therapy that the book itself has provided me with, I was struck to find in her early work the seeds and signals of the more recent essays. Like going to an exhibition of a great artist and discover the signs of his later work in the paintings he/she painted as an adolescent. Or see that "the end is in the beginning" as she says, I think quoting Hegel, but certainly her latest husband CLR James in her latest essay. A long overdue collection/tribute to a great organizational mind, to which the movement, internationally, owes a lot.

Read this book and act on it.
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on 5 May 2014
Seems like nowadays everyone who wants to change the world – or even just stop it hurtling towards apocalyptic disaster – is drawn to the question of how to make their organising more “inclusive”. Looking here at the works of Selma James, written in the course of more than 60 years of grassroots organising, it is clear that she has always focused on how to overcome divides of sex, race, and class, and also nation.
For her, the “work . . . hard work” of “confronting the power relations among ourselves and with others as they surface in the course of our campaigning, spelling out the varied, pernicious and subtle forms they take, and working out ways to organise against them. . . is not separate or apart from organizing but central to it.”
Filled with home truths, global perspectives, historical news, clear directions, and personal challenges, it also treats you to wit of a kind you see only when the absolute absurdity of capital’s logic meets someone who accepts not even one little one of its premises.
Don’t cheat yourself – get hold of it!
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on 22 December 2013
This book collects Selma James' writing from the early `50s to 2012. It is like going to an exhibition of a great artist and see the signs of his/her later work present in what the artist produced when very young. "The end is in the beginning" as she says paraphrasing Hegel and her late husband CLR James, to whom she pays a long overdue tribute as a great organizer in her last essay.

I read this book as a therapy against possible depression after suffering a cardiac arrest. It contributed to save my life.

While uncompromising with careerists, opportunists and many NGOs, Selma James shows in this book that she is curious, a great listener, always ready to follow and from there to lead, not ramming the line down anyone's throat. The book leaves no space to sectarianism. Buy, read it and use it.
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on 17 March 2014
One thing that is so inspiring about this book is the clarity of the
anti-racism. Someone said to me "her arguments are very logical". And I
found the article on Marx and Feminism really useful for understanding how
human beings produce wealth and how it is stolen (including by the likes of
Amaz0n). This anthology includes the movement classic that gives this book
its name, Sex, Race and Class, which defines the word "culture" -- "culture
is the shrill of the alarm clock that rings at 6am .etc" . And there's lots
of culture in this -- it's easy and interesting to read, and anyone would be
the richer for reading it - your mum, brother, daughter, colleague.
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on 4 April 2014
From the very first piece - A Woman's Place written by James when barely out of her teens more than 60 years ago - you immediately find yourself in the world of an organizer for social justice looking for what moves people and the ways in which we instinctively fight against oppression and exploitation. One always feels that James sees herself as one of those struggling and not some outsider looking in - she is always an organizer fighting with others for her own liberation as part of theirs. As such the victories and defeats seem very personal. Even when she does theoretical work, it is always with an immediate organizational goal in mind. The reader will not be bored or disappointed.
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on 29 April 2014
From the very first piece - A Woman's Place written by James when barely out of her teens more than 60 years ago - you immediately find yourself in the world of an organizer for social justice looking for what moves people and the ways in which we instinctively fight against oppression and exploitation. One always feels that James sees herself as one of those struggling and not some outsider looking in - she is always an organizer fighting with others for her own liberation as part of theirs. As such the victories and defeats seem very personal. Even when she does theoretical work, it is always with an immediate organizational goal in mind. The reader will not be bored or disappointed.
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on 12 April 2014
One thing that is so inspiring about this book is the clarity of the anti-racism. Someone said to me "her arguments are very logical". And I found the article on Marx and Feminism really useful for understanding how human beings produce wealth and how it is stolen (including by the likes of Amazon). This anthology includes the movement classic that gives this book its name, Sex, Race and Class, which defines the word "culture" -- "culture is the shrill of the alarm clock that rings at 6am .etc" . And there's lots of culture in this -- it's easy and interesting to read, and anyone would be the richer for reading it - your mum, brother, daughter, colleague.
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on 1 May 2014
I find myself constantly recommending Selma James's writing to friends and family who are interested in feminism and Marx and are bored of a one-dimensional liberal feminism intent on telling us how we should live (and how we should sit in work meetings - apparently I'm supposed to be leaning in or some s***?). Her writing is easy to read but doesn't feel like it's dumbing down the complicated stuff - it speaks with refreshing clarity. I can't recommend this anthology enough.
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on 4 April 2014
exciting, easy to read and understand. i recommend very highly, especially to anyone interested in grassroots organising and fighting for justice.
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