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A Clash of Kings: Book 2 of A Song of Ice and Fire Audio Download – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 1,456 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 37 hours and 12 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Limited
  • Audible.co.uk Release Date: 3 Nov. 2015
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005CB5ICW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The perfect companion for all history enthusiasts is THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKER Calix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker

This brick of a book (969 pages of fairly closely-set type) is the second volume in George R. R. Martin's fantasy series "A Song of Ice and Fire". The series currently stands at four volumes and three more are projected. the first volume began the series only pretty well. This volume continues it rather better.

The story lives up to its title. A character in the novel remarks that all sorts of people are calling themselves kings these days, and there sure are a lot of them. At the end of the first volume, young Robb Stark was proclaimed King in the North since the young Joffrey Baratheon who is ruling in the south isn't properly the heir of the previous king, Robert, whose death was engineered by Joffrey's mother's family. Dead King Robert's brother Stannis should properly be king and he intends to fight for the crown. But his younger brother Renly also calls himself king and intends to fight Stannis for the chance to fight Joffrey. And King Robert had himself unseated Mad King Aerys. His son died in the first book, but his daughter, lately the widow of a nomad chieftain, has come into possession of three baby dragons and intends to use them to put her family back in power. King Joffrey is quite young and the actual ruling is done by his mother Cersei (as regent) and his maternal uncle Tyrion (as the King's Hand). The two mistrust one another. You'll gather that the conflict is many-sided.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Where the first book belongs to Ned Stark, this second is owned by Tyrion Lannister, the dwarf lord who rises to the challenge of curbing his psychotic nephew's worst excesses (said psychotic nephew being King of the realm). Westeros is now at war, with kings lining up to stake a claim to the Iron Throne of the realm, and accordingly this is a war novel, packed with politics and intrigue to break up the battles. It is in watching the charismatic Tyrion discovering, at last, how he can best find a place in the game of thrones at which he excels. As the book builds towards the battle of King's Landing, he thrives on the chaos and preparation despite himself, and you can't help rooting for him despite his unfortunate ancestry. As ever with this series though, singling out this strand of the massive plot necessarily does disservice to others, and the way that they weave together to deliver an epic, captivating story.
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Format: Paperback
If you want clean cut heroes, buy another book. Every character is more venomous than the last. You find yourself unwillingly fascinated by the depths of brutality and depravity that even the most amiable can reach. And for all that, I couldn't put the evil thing down. For every horror you suffer you're rewarded with a stroke of humanity that seems all the more poignant against the dark backdrop.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The problem with such a consistently amazing author is that it's hard to find new things to say when reviewing them, at least as far as talking about the writing goes. George R R Martin still uses a winning formula in A Clash of Kings as he does in A Game of Thrones. Thorough world-building + epic scope + complex characters + linguistic mastery = fantastic writing.

I'd talk about the plot, which of course changes from book to book, but Martin's stories are always so chock full of twists and turns that every reader should discover for themselves, and I definitely do not want to be responsible for giving any spoilers. What I can say about the plot is that I love how thick and complicated it is - and again, this holds true for any of the books in the A Song of Ice and Fire series. There's always so much going on at once, and actions have knock on consequences that then prompt other characters to take other measures... all interlinked and connected. Again, this just adds to the realism and authenticity that this series feels imbued with. Something that really disappoints me about some books is that authors dumb down the complexity of events and talk down to the reader - for example, omitting or simplifying events, conflating characters, or repeatedly spoon-feeding the reader information that the characters themselves already know full well. Personally I want to read a plot as thick as ASOIAF. I shouldn't have to praise George R R Martin for trusting his readers to understand and enjoy a sophisticated plot - we should expect this high standard from every novel.

If I start raving about detailed and immersive Martin's world is I'll start repeating myself from my A Game of Thrones review. Needless to say I loved it.
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Format: Paperback
I've just finished reading A Clash of Kings for the second time, this reading co-inciding with the series finishing on Sky Atlantic. There's lots to get your teeth into with this rather huge installment. While it may look around the same size of A Game of Thrones, the font is much smaller and in reality, this is a much bigger book. And where the opening to Martin's epic series has to contend with setting the scene and world building, the story here really takes off and plunges us deep into the machinations of an empire gone mad.

We have several Kings, lots of cut-throats, an inordinate amount of political manouvering and backstabbing, and a few weighty battles thrown into the mix. For sure it's a heady brew, one which is made all the more powerful by Martin's persecution of his characters, and willingness to dispense with people we've come to love, or at least empathise with. Good characters do bad things, bad characters do worse and overall you begin to get the sense of the greyness of the characterisation. There's barely any black and white, good guy/bad guy characters here, as everyone is so grey and dare I say it...authentic. And this is the true strength of Martin's writing in my opinion.

Everyone is so believable, the writing feels so real. And as you progress through this installment you really do get a sense of everything descending into chaos. It's fabulous, fabulous stuff, and certainly at this stage in A Song of Ice and Fire, I can honestly say Martin has no equal.
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