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This fascinating book of alternative history examines the evidence of weights and measures and comes to the conclusion that there must have been an advanced culture in prehistory. The structures of the Stone Age were built by using a very precise unit of measurement, called the megalithic yard. The book explores the science behind prehistoric units, their mathematical origin and means of reproduction, and proves that these are linked to the dimensions of the solar system.
The reader must have a basic knowledge of arithmetic but overall the book is an easy read and very revealing. Amongst the topics discussed are writing, Egypt, Sumeria, the Minoan foot, solar and sidereal days, pendulums and the importance of the planet Venus. It turns out that the British Pound and Pint are both derived from ancient measurements. The units of the hour, minute and second were developed more than 4000 years ago, from the movements of the moon.
The text also encompasses subjects like the harmony of the spheres, Sumerian degrees and the calendar, and explains that the metric system is not a recent invention. There is a section on Thomas Jefferson and his achievements; this great man apparently realized that he was rediscovering parts of a very ancient system.
Amongst the most captivating sections is the chapter on music and light. There is a definite correspondence between the rotating mass of our planet and human music. Also, megalithic mathematics produces its own musical structure. The authors conclude that there must have been an advanced people who instructed the rest of the world in science and technology. They also refer to the Masonic concept of the Great Architect of the Universe.
There are seven appendices that include further information on earth days and the megalithic year, megalithic music, the Phaistos Disc, the amazing barley seed, and the connection between megalithic principles and Freemasonry. The colour plates include approximately 20 full colour photographs and there are many black and white illustrations throughout the text. The book concludes with an index.
I also recommend Lost Civilisations Of The Stone Age by Richard Rudgley, Stone Age Soundtracks by Paul Devereux, and Forbidden Archaeology by Michael Cremo and Richard Thompson.
0Comment| 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 October 2009
Having read and enjoyed "Uriel's Machine" by Christopher Knight and Robert Lomas, I found this book to be an excellent companion to the earlier work. The authors have built on and expanded the findings of the late Professor Alexander Thom, who examined in detail, and attempted to explain, the methods used by the builders of the megalithic sites to be found in Britain and Western Europe.

Thom's work was criticised as "Pseudoscience" by the archaeological establishment during his lifetime, but the authors have vindicated Thom and gone on to make some pretty interesting discoveries of their own. At the heart of the mystery of places like Stonehenge, Newgrange, and similar sites, is the fact that the various builders seemed to be using a standardised unit of measurement Thom called the "Megalithic Yard".

The authors theorise, as did Thom, that these ancient builders seem to have used the swing of a pendulum compared to the movements of heavenly bodies such as the planet Venus, to arrive at their units of measurement. This would explain how their Megalithic Yards were so consistent over a wide area.

In "Uriel's Machine" Knight and Lomas presented compelling evidence that these ancient structures seemed to function as observatories, possibly to identify eclipses, the passage of the seasons, etc., but also to look out for warning signs in the heavens of the approach of any rogue comets or asteroids. Knight and Butler have examined the relationship between the dimensions of these buildings and the dimensions of the Earth and come up with some neat mathematical calculations which seem to show beyond reasonable doubt, that the Ancients possessed advanced knowledge of the Earth, Moon, Sun and the planet Venus, and built this knowledge into their various constructions.

The authors go on to show that the British measurements of the Pint and the Pound have a direct relationship to the Megalithic Yard. They then examine the measurements used by other civilisations such as the Sumerians and the Minoans, and have discovered a relationship between these units with the modern Metre. Again, the Kilo and the Litre also seem to be based on these ancient measurements.

The thread throughout all these findings seems to be that ancient civilisations in Britain, Europe and elsewhere possessed advanced astronomical knowledge and integrated it into their everyday lives. Again, the mystery is: how did these fairly primitive people acquire this body of knowledge? Harking back to "Uriel's Machine" and the relevant passages from the "Book Of Enoch" mentioned in that book, the reader will then make the not unreasonable assumption that an advanced race, origin unknown, seemed to be the source.

If you haven't already done so, my recommendation would be to read "Uriel's Machine" as well as "Civilization One". That way you will get a fuller picture of what Messrs Knight, Lomas and Butler are driving at. Their findings are pretty sensational, and of course they have been labelled, as Thom was, as "Pseudoscientists".

An excellent analysis of Knight and Butler's findings can be found on Wikipedia under the title "Pseudoscientific Metrology".
22 comments| 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
This fascinating book of alternative history examines the evidence of weights and measures and comes to the conclusion that there must have been an advanced culture in prehistory. The structures of the Stone Age were built by using a very precise unit of measurement, called the megalithic yard. The book explores the science behind prehistoric units, their mathematical origin and means of reproduction, and proves that these are linked to the dimensions of the solar system.
The reader must have a basic knowledge of arithmetic but overall the book is an easy read and very revealing. Amongst the topics discussed are writing, Egypt, Sumeria, the Minoan foot, solar and sidereal days, pendulums and the importance of the planet Venus. It turns out that the British Pound and Pint are both derived from ancient measurements. The units of the hour, minute and second were developed more than 4000 years ago, from the movements of the moon.
The text also encompasses subjects like the harmony of the spheres, Sumerian degrees and the calendar, and explains that the metric system is not a recent invention. There is a section on Thomas Jefferson and his achievements; this great man apparently realized that he was rediscovering parts of a very ancient system.
Amongst the most captivating sections is the chapter on music and light. There is a definite correspondence between the rotating mass of our planet and human music. Also, megalithic mathematics produces its own musical structure. The authors conclude that there must have been an advanced people who instructed the rest of the world in science and technology. They also refer to the Masonic concept of the Great Architect of the Universe.
There are seven appendices that include further information on earth days and the megalithic year, megalithic music, the Phaistos Disc, the amazing barley seed, and the connection between megalithic principles and Freemasonry. The colour plates include approximately 20 full colour photographs and there are many black and white illustrations throughout the text. The book concludes with an index.
I also recommend Lost Civilisations Of The Stone Age by Richard Rudgley, Stone Age Soundtracks by Paul Devereux, and Forbidden Archaeology by Michael Cremo and Richard Thompson.
0Comment| 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 November 2010
I enjoyed this book and it has some quite startling claims and revelations concerning the origin of weights, measures and even the origin of the moon. These are perplexing mysteries but very interesting to think about.

As a Druid I found the material on the Megalithic yard and the method of attuning this to the planet venus with a pendulum very interesting indeed. The book also seems to have a hint of a Masonic flavour and so may well be of interest to Masons too.

I'd recommend it to those interested in ancient mysteries for sure.
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on 12 January 2010
the book is basically about measurment systems and how they came about - such as the megalithic yard etc.
not really a big surprise about the world .

bad purchase choice / bad title
0Comment| 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

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