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Cinnamon Kiss (Basic) [Large Print] [Hardcover]

Walter Mosley
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Book Description

19 Oct 2005 Basic

It is the Summer of Love as CINNAMON KISS opens, and Easy Rawlins is contemplating robbing an armoured car. It's further outside the law than Easy has ever travelled, but his daughter Feather needs a medical treatment that costs far more than Easy can earn or borrow in time. And his friend Mouse tells him it's a cinch.

Then another friend, Saul Lynx, offers a job that might solve Easy's problem without jail time. He has to track the disappearance of an eccentric, prominent attorney. His assistant of sort, the beautiful 'Cinnamon' Cargill, has gone as well. Easy can tell there is much more than he is being told - Robert Lee, his new employer, is as suspect as the man who disappeared. But his need overcomes all concerns, and he plunges into unfamiliar territory, from the newfound hippie enclaves to a vicious plot that stretches back to the battlefields of Europe. The New York Times said of Mosley's bestseller, Little Scarlet, 'Nobody, but nobody, writes this stuff like Mosley'. CINNAMON KISS is further proof that he is the absolute master of crime fiction.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Hardcover: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Thorndike Press; Lrg edition (19 Oct 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786278552
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786278558
  • Product Dimensions: 22.2 x 16.8 x 2.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

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Review

For anyone who has not yet discovered Walter Mosley, Cinnamon Kiss is a good place to start (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)

Cinnamon Kiss is a pacey, gutsy thriller with an intriguing cast of cold killers and hot women (Simon Shaw MAIL ON SUNDAY)

[A] powerful, crime novel (THE SUNDAY TIMES)

Executed in the deft, cool prose that is Mosley's trademark (GUARDIAN) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

New York Times bestseller Walter Mosley's sizzling new novel pits Easy Rawlins - 'the best series detective (Entertainment Weekly)' - against his greatest ever challenge. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sexual Mores and Mystery in the Summer of Love 5 Feb 2006
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Hardcover
Artists have long been fascinated with taking a famous painting and duplicating that painting in their own style to help viewers appreciate what's different about their work. Walter Mosley has been doing the same for us in ten books by creating his African American detective, Easy Rawlins, who solves mysteries with few resources other than his brain and an occasional help from his friends. Through these stories, current day readers can step back into earlier times and "experience" racism from the receiving end. The treatments ring true, and they take the familiar genre of noir detection into the realm of literary novel by helping us transfer into the lives of these fascinating characters.
In this story, Easy and Bonnie face one of those crises that can destroy a relationship. Easy's daughter Feather has a serious disease and seems to be dying. The only hope is to raise $35,000 (in 1960s dollars) for a custom, experimental treatment in Switzerland. Easy has a little money set aside, but nothing like $35,000. He puts out the word that he needs help and Mouse offers a set-up armed robbery where a guard has fixed the deal. But Easy begins to imagine himself in a striped suit and puts Mouse off.
Fortunately, another lead appears for a shadowy detective in San Francisco who seems to be in the story to provide a satire on Charley's Angels. Although there's a promise of big money, that promise soon seems to be broken by betrayal and deceit.
Easy's job is to find Cinnamon Cargill, a young woman who worked for an attorney who seems to have laid his hands on some papers that people will kill to keep private. Not surprisingly, his connections in the African-American community allow him to make contact while others are simply circling in the distance.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I admit I'm biased 30 Nov 2006
Format:Paperback
The work of Walter Mosey is something I chris and look forward to, for he is my favourite author bar none. But to be critical of this book I would have to say it did not grab me as much as "Six Easy Pieces"; "Devil in a Blue Dress"; "Bad Boy Brawly Brown" and "Fear Itself" which happen to be my favourite Mosley titles. I would rank it higly though it is full of the trade mark Rawlins drawl and the seamless street poetry that seem to litter the prose of Mosley's writing. I would urge you to buy this book maybe not if you're a fisrt time easy reader as some of the characters would be lost on you as thier traits and mannerism described would lose a lot as the humour possessed by the discription fo the scenarios you would lose if you have not read the others. Buy this book today
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sexual Mores and Mystery in the Summer of Love 5 Feb 2006
By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAME TOP 500 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
Artists have long been fascinated with taking a famous painting and duplicating that painting in their own style to help viewers appreciate what's different about their work. Walter Mosley has been doing the same for us in ten books by creating his African American detective, Easy Rawlins, who solves mysteries with few resources other than his brain and an occasional help from his friends. Through these stories, current day readers can step back into earlier times and "experience" racism from the receiving end. The treatments ring true, and they take the familiar genre of noir detection into the realm of literary novel by helping us transfer into the lives of these fascinating characters.
In this story, Easy and Bonnie face one of those crises that can destroy a relationship. Easy's daughter Feather has a serious disease and seems to be dying. The only hope is to raise $35,000 (in 1960s dollars) for a custom, experimental treatment in Switzerland. Easy has a little money set aside, but nothing like $35,000. He puts out the word that he needs help and Mouse offers a set-up armed robbery where a guard has fixed the deal. But Easy begins to imagine himself in a striped suit and puts Mouse off.
Fortunately, another lead appears for a shadowy detective in San Francisco who seems to be in the story to provide a satire on Charley's Angels. Although there's a promise of big money, that promise soon seems to be broken by betrayal and deceit.
Easy's job is to find Cinnamon Cargill, a young woman who worked for an attorney who seems to have laid his hands on some papers that people will kill to keep private. Not surprisingly, his connections in the African-American community allow him to make contact while others are simply circling in the distance.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Treat! 23 Jan 2006
Format:Hardcover
If you haven't had a chance to read this writer's great book then you have no idea what you are missing! Give this story a try. You'll be glad you did!
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  76 reviews
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "In The Company Of An Old Friend" 14 Oct 2005
By H. F. Corbin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Easy Rawlins is back in Walter Mosley's tenth novel in the series and is better than ever. He is so polished, shrewd, cool in the best sense of the word and altogether human. This time he is faced with every parent's nightmare, the possibility of a young child's dying from a rare illness. Most of the action is about his efforts-- by whatever means available-- to raise the necessary cash for expensive treatment for his daughter Feather in a hospital in Switzerland. Easy's woman Bonnie-- or is she?-- is back, along with his buddy Mouse and a host of other characters we remember from earlier novels. Mr. Mosley is nothing if not creative and we'd better not take him for granted. This is evident in the way this story ends; we see that Easy will go in a different direction in the next novel in the series.

As always, Mr. Mosley writes in concise, precise understated language. He is introspective about race in these United States in the 1960's-- sadly sometimes it seems as if little has changed since then-- without being didactic. He through Easy makes profound statements about the world: having a sense of humor is the best test of intelligence, black men who kill innocent people in far-away countries are no better than the whites who lynched blacks. Finally in Easy's own words when he and Mouse, as they are making a call from a phone booth, are approached by two white cops and questioned: "Most Americans wouldn't understand why two well-dressed men would have to explain why they were standing on a public street. But most Americans cannot comprehend the scrutiny that black people have been under since the days we were dragged here in bondage."

Even though Mr. Mosley always writes about race his characters are not just black and white. He has as many ways to describe skin color as Eskimos have of names for snow. In addition to just "brown," there is "medium brown," "toasted brown," "coffee brown," "high brown like a polished pecan," "light brown sugar," "sepia hue." Then we have "light-skinned," "sandpaper toned," and "high-yellow." Darker colors go from "walnut shelled," "almost jet skin," "dark-colored," the "color of tree bark," "dark-skinned," "very black,"-- and my favorite-- "skin black as an undertaker's shoes." Finally there are the reddish tones: "reddish-brown plantain" skin, "reddish hue," "terra cotta colored" and of course the beautiful character Cinnamon Cargill whose skin is described as "cinnamon red."

It is such a pleasure to read a new Rawlins mystery. Easy in a beautiful passage describes missing Bonnie and loneliness. "Never before could I fully trust another human being. If it was five in the morning and I'd been out all night I could call her [Bonnie] and she'd be there as fast as she could. . . Being with her made me understand how lonely I'd been for all my wandering years. But being alone again made me feel that I was back in the company of an old friend." Reading Mosley is just like being with an old friend. I have never read a better mystery writer.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be Easy! 29 Nov 2005
By One Word Mag.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Walter Mosley is one of the most versatile writers laboring in the field of modern fiction. Best known for his mysteries concerning Los Angeles private investigator Easy Rawlins, Mosley is not afraid to turn his talents to other genres, whether it be non-specific genre fiction, fantasy, or essays.

Rawlins, however, remains Mosley's most popular character from a commercial standpoint. Part hard-boiled, part historical fiction, part.something else, the book, like Mosley, defies easy classification. Rawlins moves through mid-20th century America part invisible man, part very visible man, a good man in a very bad world who is aware that survival depends on compromise but who ultimately remains true to himself.

CINNAMON KISS, Mosley's latest Easy Rawlins novel, is set in the mid-1960s. It is the Summer of Love, but Rawlins' concerns are much more basic. His daughter,Feather, is in need of immediate medical treatment that costs much more money than Rawlins could beg for or borrow. When Mouse, Rawlins's friend and occasional partner, approaches him with the prospect of a heist with minimal risk and a large payoff, Rawlins is tempted to compromise his principles for the greater good of financing Heather's treatment.

However, salvation comes from another direction, when Rawlins's friend Saul Lynx approaches him with a more legitimate offer. Robert Lee, an enigmatic private investigator in San Francisco, has been hired to locate Axel Bowers, a prominent Bay-area attorney, and his assistant, the beautiful and mysterious Cinnamon Cargill. Bowers and Cargill have gone missing with some documents belonging to Lee's client, who is willing to pay dearly to get them back.

Rawlins is able to find Bowers easily enough, but Cargill has seemingly vanished into the wind. In his search for Cargill, Rawlins learns that he is not only racing against the clock but also against a deadly assassin whose name is enough to cause even the most dangerous of men to exercise caution. Rawlins soon learns that he is a part of something far more extensive than a document retrieval matter, and that his involvement is bringing not only himself but also his friends and family into terrible danger.

CINNAMON KISS is perhaps the most ambitious of Mosley's Rawlins novels, and arguably his best. He avoids the overly complex plotting that has occasionally overtaken some of his other fine work, and instead chooses to focus on his always interesting and multi-dimensional characters. There are enough of them here to fill three books. One of the most interesting is Robert Lee, could be the basis for a series all by himself. Mosley's description of the man and his home are worth the price of admission alone, and it would be quite interesting to see Lee's and Mosley's paths cross uneasily a time or two again.

And, as with other Rawlins novels, CINNAMON KISS concludes with some resolutions and some beginnings, the better to prepare the legion of readers of this fine series for the next volume. It can't come too soon.
15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PERFECT READING OF POPULAR CRIME FICTION 30 Sep 2005
By Gail Cooke - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Audio CD
Tough, gentle. Melancholy, euphoric. Actor/writer Michael Boatman is able to convey all of these emotions with his voice, and he does it to perfection in his reading of Walter Mosley's latest in the popular Easy Rawlins series.

Many will remember Boatman from his numerous TV appearances, especially in the role of Carter Heywood on "The Administration." However TV appearances are just the tip of the iceberg for this talented actor. His stage credits include such diverse plays as "The Seagull" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream." A native of Colorado Springs, he is now at work on his second novel.

Doubtless the iconic Easy Rawlins is one of the most popular characters in crime fiction. While some series protagonists may tend to become stale, that is never the case with Easy. With "Cinnamon Kiss" listeners are once again returned to the 1960s as Easy faces one of his most daunting personal crises - his young daughter, Feather, has contracted a rare disease. This may be fatal for the girl unless Easy can come up with $35,000 for treatment at a Swiss clinic. It seems to be an unattainable figure.

His pal, Mouse, has a quick fix - they could rob an armored car. Easy backs away from that and accepts a job to find two missing persons. One of the now-you-see-him, now-you-don't persons is a well to do lawyer, and the other is his gorgeous assistant, Cinnamon.

Sound easy? Never so for Easy. He travels to California for his first look at communes and hippies. However, that's about all he sees - no signs of the missing. What he does find is murder trailing in his wake, and he has no idea why.

No one crafts a crime thriller like Walter Mosley - listen and enjoy.

- Gail Cooke
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I've already cast the actors for the movie! 10 Jan 2006
By cmm@chocolatesleuth.com - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
CINNAMON KISS opens with Easy Rawlins struggling with the thought of robbing an armored car in order to provide his daughter, Feather an expensive medical treatment. Though Easy has operated outside the law before, this "sure thing" his friend Mouse has presented him with provides Easy a considerable amount of angst.

Then another friend, Saul Lynx,(William H. Macy in my movie version--HA!) offers Easy a more palatable job investigating the disappearance of an eccentric attorney whose assistant of sorts, the beautiful and mysterious Philomena "Cinnamon" Cargill, is gone as well. Easy's new employer, Robert Lee, is as suspect as the man who disappeared.

In CINNAMON KISS Mosley deftly takes the reader on a journey from the hate and racism of World War II Germany to free love and acid trippin' in California's Haight-Ashbury in the 1960's.

This smart, witty novel is WM at his best. It's a perfect mystery that pulls the reader in from the opening scene and drops him right into the action---and there's plenty of it---with memorable characters (Christmas Black and old favorites Mouse and Blue) and believable storylines that blend to make this a perfectly enjoyable read. This is the best Easy Rawlins novel I've read in a long time. CK would make an excellent movie and I hope it's brought to the screen.

ChocolateSleuth.com Rating: 5 Handcuffs.

Oh, yeah...the end saddened me about Easy's love relationship. This book has everything. I was totally satisfied.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mosley's people 23 Sep 2006
By Alan Meyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Others have explained the plot and talked about how much they
liked or disliked the story of _Cinnamon Kiss_. I'll skip that
here and write instead about my reaction to the character of Easy
Rawlins.

I've read almost all of the Easy Rawlins stories. Easy is the
same difficult, ambiguous man in each of them. He's tough and
street smart, but he's also haunted by memories of a difficult
southern childhood, of battles with both Germans and white
Americans in World War II, and of things he's done that he's not
proud of.

He's not a likeable man. He's not an easy man to deal with.
He's stubborn to the point of self-destructiveness. He pisses
off the only man who can save him or give him the money he needs
to save his daughter, simply because he can't stop himself from
asserting his equality with anyone. He turns down help he
desparately needs from a wealthy white woman who means well,
simply because he is too proud to expose his need and ask for
help. He has to do things his way, and only his way.

He is attracted to, and attractive to, women, but he doesn't
understand them and is unable to form permanent relationships.
He cares desparately about his children but is not altogether
able to understand them either. He lives in a sort of permanent
conflict with the world - never quite able to find peace.

Some reviewers here have disliked Rawlins for his sexism, or
loved him for his cool, his bravado, his excitement.

I can't really say I either like him or dislike him. He's too
difficult a person to really like, and too genuine to dislike. I
couldn't live the way he lives. I'm sure I couldn't walk in his
shoes.

He's a man with great strength, but with jagged edges and sharp
corners.

I don't believe we need to like a character to find him
fascinating and to want to read about him. Easy Rawlins is not a
man I'd want to live next door to. But he is a fascinating man.

Walter Mosley has a gift for creating characters that stand
outside the boundaries of ordinary middle class life. They are
men who can look at, but never enter into, the ordinary life.
They try to blend in, but they can't. It's not in them to be
satisfied, stable, ordinary men.

Easy Rawlins, Raymond Alexander, Socrates Fortlow (from another
Mosley series), and others are such characters. They give the
stories an edge that many other mysteries never achieve. They
are a main reason why I read these books.
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