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Cider with Roadies: From School Bus to Tour Bus without Ever Growing Up Paperback – 5 Feb 2004


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Product details

  • Paperback: 307 pages
  • Publisher: Ebury Press (5 Feb 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0091891159
  • ISBN-13: 978-0091891152
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2.4 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,036,553 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stuart Maconie is a writer, broadcaster and journalist familiar to millions from his work in print, on radio and on TV. His previous bestsellers have included Cider with Roadies, Pies and Prejudice and Adventures on the High Teas, and he currently hosts the afternoon show on BBC 6music with Mark Radcliffe as well as weekly show The Freak Zone. Based in the cities of Birmingham and Manchester, he can also often be spotted on top of a mountain in the Lake District with a Thermos flask and individual pork pie.


Product Description

Review

"From council estate to Radio 2, Stuart Maconie has lived the perfect pop fan's life...effortlessly articulate" -- The Times

"Maconie makes a jovial, self-deprecating narrator. Sharp and funny" -- The Guardian

`Stuart Maconie is the best thing to come out of Wigan since the A58 to Bolton’ -- Peter Kay

Book Description

The hilarious coming-of-age memoir from the bestselling author of Pies and Prejudice --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Bantam Dave TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 15 May 2007
Format: Paperback
If like me you enjoyed reading Stuart Maconies recent 'Pies & Prejudice' you could do worse than give `Cider with Roadies' a try.

In this earlier book he describes his life as a music lover using the same brand of wit and good humour that shone through in Pies and also in his many appearances on TV and radio.

The book is basically in two sections. The first describes how he first became aware of music when he was a child - playing the odd assortment of records owned by his parents - through to when he started going to gigs and also playing in a band. This to me is the stronger section because a lot of what he writes about strikes a chord with me, as it will to most readers in their forties. The second section concerns his stint as a writer for the NME and to me the book flags slightly here because at times it becomes too much of a list of performers he has interviewed and places he has visited.

All in all this is a book that is well worth tracking down.
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36 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Ridgeway on 12 Sep 2006
Format: Paperback
I inherited this book from a mate while we were on a motorbike tour. He'd got half way through and chucked it over to me saying it was the biggest load of rubbish he's ever read - he'd not even got half way through it!

Maybe it's just as well that, "One man's meat is another mans' poison" because I thoroughly enjoyed reading of Maconies journey, as he takes us from his first Beatles influence to his life as a Top DJ: via INXS, The Smiths, work as Teacher at Skelmersdale college and journalist for NME.

Witty and articulate, Maconie's tale of his life as a "Muso" unfolds with great ease and at times I actually laughed out loud at some of his tales - 4 days with a "Napalm Death" in the tour van in France is priceless. Being a Scouser who loves music and lives in Wigan maybe I can identify with this book more than most but whatever, it's a nice easy read that flows very well.

There are a couple of inaccuracies in here. Stuart, if you can get from Edge Hill College in Ormskirk to Liverpool on a bus in twenty minutes I salute you, because you'll be the first person ever to achieved such a feat! Also if you drove through Limoges to get to Le mans in France let me tell you, you went one hell of a long way round.

Some of the tales in the book are obvioulsy "flowered up" for the sake of effect but then again aren't most autobiographies? A great little book, highly recommmended if you need a bit of light reading and a good laugh.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "oohmechalfonts" on 20 May 2004
Format: Paperback
This is probably the most acutely observed book I've yet read about how pop music frames the lives of blokes of a certain age. At best High Fidelity provoked the odd wry smile or occasional frisson of recognition. Cider With Roadies is much more representative in the way it gets under the skin of pop obsession. It'll also make you laugh yourself into a prolapse. You don't have to have lived in Wigan or worked for the NME to recognise yourself in these pages. And he's absolutely spot on about the the cult of Mark E Smith. I'm not a mate of the author, penning a gushing review to add a few sales. This gush is sincere.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Walton TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 17 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
I picked this up cheaply in Fopp's last year, wondering if Maconie's memories of growing up with pop music would have any resonance for me (we're roughly the same age). Almost immediately, I found myself nodding in agreement with his recollection that, in his school, "you were Slade or T. Rex" (p31), and his memory of being blown away seeing the Mahavishnu Orchestra for the first time on the BBC - with the guitarist "pulling faces if he'd caught himself in his zip" (p43) - but I didn't realize how thoroughly I'd been hooked until my sharp intake of breath at his assertion (p49) that "Sylvia" was a track off Focus's Moving Waves - a canard that he nevertheless corrects immediately. His musical journey eventually led him to writing for the NME, although by the time he got there, I'd stopped treating every word in that august publication as gospel (partly because of a lack of appreciation of the music of the day), and so missed out on his writing.

Judging from this book, that was my loss: he has a pleasantly exact style that neatly evokes the people and places he describes. He also has a sharp wit, memorably describing (p111) a sour-faced girl as someone "who made Siouxsie Sioux look like Moira Stewart", having a face like that of "a bulldog licking piss off a nettle" - a simile which caused me to choke with laughter upon first reading it (and which almost edges out my favourite disparaging comment - first encountered long ago in Private Eye's "Dear Bill" column: "He's about as much use as a one-legged man at an arse-kicking party").
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jason Selby on 14 July 2007
Format: Paperback
A really great read for anyone, who like me is grazing 40 and loves music and the indie scene in particular. Stuart's style is witty and entertaining not deep and self revealing as other memoirs are but that is easily overcome by the depth of detail about the music which is the focus of the book.

It was a great joy for me reading this on holiday in the sunshine but being transported in imagination to the Wigan Casino and great gigs in Manchester etc. Seeing the rise of the Factory records and The Smiths through the eyes of someone who was there is a true joy.

I can't help but give it 5 stars.
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