Christian Science and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
£15.31
  • RRP: £18.01
  • You Save: £2.70 (15%)
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Christian Science Paperback – 7 Nov 2007


See all 36 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 7 Nov 2007
£15.31
£8.67 £4.47

Trade In Promotion



Product details

  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: BiblioLife (7 Nov 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1434678741
  • ISBN-13: 978-1434678744
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 1.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Mark Twain is the pseudonym of Samuel Langhorne Clemens (1835 - 1910). He was born and brought up in the American state of Missouri and, because of his father's death, he left school to earn his living when he was only twelve. He was a great adventurer and travelled round America as a printer; prospected for gold and set off for South America to earn his fortune. He returned to become a steam-boat pilot on the Mississippi River, close to where he had grown up. The Civil War put an end to steam-boating and Clemens briefly joined the Confederate army - although the rest of his family were Unionists! He had already tried his hand at newspaper reporting and now became a successful journalist. He started to use the alias Mark Twain during the Civil War and it was under this pen name that he became a famous travel writer. He took the name from his steam-boat days - it was the river pilots' cry to let their men know that the water was two fathoms deep.

Mark Twain was always nostalgic about his childhood and in 1876 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was published, based on his own experiences. The book was soon recognised as a work of genius and eight years later the sequel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, was published. The great writer Ernest Hemingway claimed that 'All modern literature stems from this one book.'

Mark Twain was soon famous all over the world. He made a fortune from writing and lost it on a typesetter he invented. He then made another fortune and lost it on a bad investment. He was an impulsive, hot-tempered man but was also quite sentimental and superstitious. He was born when Halley's Comet was passing the Earth and always believed he would die when it returned - this is exactly what happened.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 July 1999
Format: Paperback
This isn't one of Twain's best books, but it is a pretty hilarious send-up of Christian Science nonetheless. I think it is funnier if you know a little bit about the religion, but it probably doesn't seem as funny to people who actually practice the religion.
A CS friend told me that CSs are fond of quoting passages from Twain that "prove" he became a fan of Eddy in later life. The quote they cite as proof is typical of the sarcasm in this book: "Mother Eddy deserves a place in the Trinity as much as any member of it. She has organized and made available a healing principle that for two thousand years has never been employed except as the merest kind of guesswork. She is the benefactor of the age."
If the above quote strikes you as funny, buy this book. If you believe the quote is serious, I'd advise you to give it a miss.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 23 Aug 1999
Format: Hardcover
No one who appreciates great American literature would criticize Mark Twain's skill as a satirist. But anybody interested in knowing the whole truth should be aware that after Twain published this book -- and after his daughter was healed through Christian Science treatment -- he offered a full retraction and an apology that really should be included on the cover of this and any subsequent edition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 5 Dec 1998
Format: Paperback
The back cover proclaims, "This witty, caustic work is Mark Twain's extended attack on Christian Science and its founder, Mary Baker Eddy [1821-1910]. . . ."(1) The book was written between 1898 and 1903, and some parts of it appeared in magazines during that time period. Publication of the completed work was delayed for almost four years until 1907.
In the preface, Twain notes that his original text included "errors of judgment and of fact. I have now corrected these to the best of my ability and later knowledge."(2) Twain was in the habit of making these corrections using dated footnotes. The last dated correction is from March 12, 1903, meaning that no corrections were made during the book's publication delay. This is important to note, because his remarks were not entirely contemporaneous by the time the book was actually published (and they are less so by today's standards).
For instance, in the April issue of the "North American Review," Mark Twain challenged Mrs. Eddy to discontinue her personal use of the title "Mother." Due to public misunderstanding, Mrs. Eddy responded by amending one of her church bylaws forbidding church members to call her that. When Twain's book appeared in 1907, he had not updated the fact that Mrs. Eddy had acceded to his challenge, and he included new material lampooning her for use of the term. Consequently, some criticism of Twain is deserved, particularly because this misconception is still being propagated in the current editions. Furthermore, Mrs. Eddy continued her writing after this book was published, and quotations from "Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures" and the "Manual of The Mother Church" are not from the latest editions.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
42 of 51 people found the following review helpful
funny even to a non-CS 22 July 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This isn't one of Twain's best books, but it is a pretty hilarious send-up of Christian Science nonetheless. I think it is funnier if you know a little bit about the religion, but it probably doesn't seem as funny to people who actually practice the religion.
A CS friend told me that CSs are fond of quoting passages from Twain that "prove" he became a fan of Eddy in later life. The quote they cite as proof is typical of the sarcasm in this book: "Mother Eddy deserves a place in the Trinity as much as any member of it. She has organized and made available a healing principle that for two thousand years has never been employed except as the merest kind of guesswork. She is the benefactor of the age."
If the above quote strikes you as funny, buy this book. If you believe the quote is serious, I'd advise you to give it a miss.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
One of Twain's best-kept secrets 8 May 2012
By Cindy Lovell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Mark Twain remains one of the greatest social critics in history, and this book is one of the best examples of his "pen warmed up in Hell." A critical thinker whose opinions were always based in his own experiences, research, and facts, Twain takes off the gloves and pummels Christian Science and its founder, Mary Baker Eddy. Twain's public attacks were covered by the papers, which typically included Baker's statements of defense. (On January 17, 1902, for instance, she publicly defended herself for her followers calling her "mother" Mary, a direct response to a criticism by Twain. "It is a fact, well understood, that I begged the students who first gave me the endearing appellative 'mother' not to name me thus. But, without my consent, that word spread like wildfire.") This book is a scathing indictment against Christian Science, yet a handful of satirical quotes by Twain regarding Eddy and her religion are offered up as "evidence" that Twain actually admired Eddy and approved of the religion. To know Twain, one must read Twain - and not just the quotes.

A digression...

Now Val Kilmer, a Christian Scientist, is test-marketing a new one-man show as Twain and making noises about a film depicting the Twain-Eddy story. Let's hope he reads this book and actually researches Twain's life. He would do well to sit in on several dozen performances by Hal Holbrook, who actually met Twain's daughter, Clara, when he first began performing as her father. Holbrook is a Twain scholar, and it shows in his portrayal; he has memorized hundreds of lengthy passages and quotes Twain verbatim - and in context. Kilmer is an Eddy fan, and it shows in his portrayal of a semi-drunk Twain delivering one-liners (quotes out of context). (Full disclosure: I have not seen Kilmer in person, only online clips of his trial run.) A vast body of research by Twain scholars exists that detail how Twain performed onstage, and it would serve Kilmer to access this information.

The book is typical Twain - if you know Twain.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Great book for Twain lovers 1 Sep 2009
By Anna Shepherd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you love Mark Twain, you'll love this book. Be prepared there is no Becky and Big Jim to be found, just Twain's delightful writing style. Twain taking on the CHristian Scientists is enlightening and informative. I liked it very much
45 of 62 people found the following review helpful
Still one of the best books about "Christian 'Science'" 7 July 2001
By Super Woman Three - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The first part of Mark Tawin's work on "Christian 'Science'" is very funny; he shows through parody and wit just how ignorant, stupid, superstitious, and gullible human beings can be. The second part is much more serious: Twain shows how the sinister organization came into existance, and remarks upon Eddy's criminal and abusive acts when starting the business, as well as mentions some of the plagerism she committed.
This is by far one of the best books about how the "Christian 'Science'" organization came to exist. While the book is a classic, it is also timeless.
If you are interested in Eddy or "Christian 'Science,'" this is the single best source for you to explore. I recomend this book HIGHLY!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Hilarious and insightful 25 Mar 2012
By Kael Varnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book is absolutely laugh out loud funny. And as someone who was thoroughly indoctrinated in C.S. (CS schools, "class instruction," etc.) I can say that Twain absolutely "gets" Christian Science, to the extent that anyone really can. He doesn't have a strong enough understanding of philosophy to make a more fundamental case against CS's underlying premises, but he does a great job at exposing many of the contradictions and irrationalities, in his uniquely stylistic way. He collapses into subjectivism at times, but I won't hold it against him. A thoroughly entertaining read, and a reminder of how much more intellectual satirist/humorists were 100 years ago than they are today (see vicious cynic Bill Maher for today's equivalent).
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback