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Christ Recrucified Paperback – 18 Jun 2001


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Product details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Faber & Faber; New Ed edition (18 Jun 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571190219
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571190218
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 3 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 206,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Nikos Kazantzakis was born in 1883 in Herakleion on the island of Crete. During the Cretan revolt of 1897 his family was sent to the island of Naxos, where he attended the French School of the Holy Cross. From 1902 to 1906 he studied law at Athens University. He worked first as a journalist and throughout a long career wrote several plays, travel journals and translations. His remarkable travels began in 1907 and there were few countries in Europe or Asia that he didn't visit. He studied Buddhism in Vienna and later belonged to a group of radical intellectuals in Berlin, where he began his great epic The Odyssey, which he completed in 1938. He didn't start writing novels until he was almost 60 and completed his most famous work, Zorba the Greek, in 1946. Other novels include Freedom and Death (1953) and The Last Temptation (1954), which the Vatican placed on the Index. Return to Greco, an autobiographical novel, was published in 1961.Nikos Kazantzakis finally settled in Antibes with his second wife, and died there from leukaemia in October 1957. He is buried at Herakleion, where the epitaph on his tomb reads: 'I hope for nothing. I fear nothing. I am free'.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Dec 1998
Format: Paperback
I have only read Kazantzakis' book in the original Greek, although the Faber translation is considered a good one. For those who only know Kazantzakis' more controversial works and those which have been made into motion pictures, such as the Last Temptation of Christ and Zorba the Greek, I highly recommend this book. It paints a vivid picture of 19th century Greek reality in a small town, where the villagers are preparing a dramatization of Christ's passions, as was the custom. The parts of the main players, Christ, Judas, the Apostles, are distributed among the villagers. Around that time, a group of men from a neighbouring town arrive at the village after their homes were destroyed by the Turks. As the village of Lykovrysi ponders over what to do with the strangers, we see the reflection of their roles in the Christ Passion in their behavior in real life. Kazantzakis relives the Passions and the Crucifixion, and asks the profoundly real question: 'How many times must we recrucify you, Christ...' until we see that you are none other than our neighbor... A beautiful work which cauterizes the Christian Church and seeks the meaning of God. I highly recommend this book.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 12 Feb 2005
Format: Paperback
Put simply - I did not expect to be so blown away by a book. I love Kazantzakis' work but thought I'd read his best novel - Freedom and Death - but this book is just awesome.
It sounds over the top to say a book can change your life - but I genuinely think that this book probably can. You surely cannot fail to be moved by the plight of the plight of the refugees from a distant village. The scene is Lykovrisi, a wealthy Greek village at the time of Greco-Turkish War of 1919-1922. The people of the village are preparing to put on a dramatic re-telling of the story of Christ's Passion. The ordinary villagers - are selected as the actors, and are studying their roles and trying to enter into the characters of the Apostles, Jesus and Mary Magdalene. Suddenly, a group of refugee Christians from a distant village, arrive at Lykovrisi. How will the inhabitants receive them? What will they do now that they are called upon to put into action the basic principles of their faith? Read this book.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Mr. K. Papas on 24 July 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first read this book in my native greek 18 years ago. I reread it in english 18 years later and was just as enthralled. Obviously a translation can never exactly match the original, the author thought and felt and described in greek. However the translation is superb and I enjoyed it tremendously. To be honest, as an atheist, maybe I am biased as religion and the fanaticism it can create, is left with a lot to answer for. Nikos Kazantzakis is no stranger to controversy though and when he sets the scene of the new priest arriving in a desperately poor greek village, you know there will be complications. When it is decided to recreate Christ's crucifixion things begin to unravel spectacularly. Highly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By H. Tee on 9 Jun 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a remarkably clever, emotional and challenging novel. It is in essence a simple story: a Greek village re-enacts the life of Christ every four years, individuals are given parts to play - how much are they inherently like or do they taken on themselves the biblical/personalities roles? The long novel of 470pages deepens the idea on so many levels you'll love it.

Ok a little more detail. The location is a smallish town called Lycovrissi on mainland Turkey (Anatolia) occupied by Greeks in the 1920s. The town is overseen by the Turkish Agha, who is just about the only Turk mentioned (except his two teenage male lovers?); though the town itself is run by the rich miser Ladas, the old Dr Patrarchis and the conniving priest Grigoris.

The town is host to the usual variety of individuals and I found it useful to keep a note of the characters and their given roles (by the priest Grigoris) in the re-enactment so here goes:
Panayataros - saddler (Judas)
Kostandis - family man and cafe owner (James)
Yanakos - carrier and mule owner (Peter)
Katerina - widow and hussy (Magdelen)
Patrachis - doctor and heavy weight (Pilate)
Michelis - Partachis's son (John)
Ladas - married to Martha (Caiaphus)
Manolios - sheep herd (Jesus)
Mariori - Grigoris daughter
Hadis - schoolmaster & Grigoris brother
Leno - Manolios' love
Fortunas - captain and Agha's drinking buddy
Demitri - butcher

The village is going strong until a group of displaced (from the Smyrna district), poor and starving Greeks headed by father Fotis descend on the town and moves into the local mountain caves (at a sign from God). The righteous want to help (e.g. Manolios) while the wealthy self-interested want rid (Ladas and Grigoris).
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