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Christ & Qabalah: Or, the Mind in the Heart [Paperback]

Gareth Knight , Anthony Duncan
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
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Book Description

31 Oct 2013
"By the time we met, he was a newly ordained curate and I was scratching a living in the esoteric world, had written a book on the Qabalah and ran an occult magazine. We were thus inhabitants of two worlds that were never supposed to meet - at least by popular convention - or if they did, to be diametrically opposed to each other." The catalyst for such a meeting of the minds was the provocative poetry of Anthony Duncan, hitherto little known to the world but privately praised by Kathleen Raine. Following on from the "Lord of the Dance" chapter in his recent autobiography, I Called it Magic, and various entries in his book of collected letters, Yours Very Truly, Gareth Knight muses on the esoteric resonances resulting from his unlikely friendship with the Reverend Anthony Duncan. Their intellectual sharing of ideas led to Duncan's The Christ, Psychotherapy and Magic and Knight's Experience of the Inner Worlds, which have become companion texts of esoteric Christianity often read and taught together. The pair had planned to co-author a book before Duncan's untimely passing in 2003 so Christ & Qabalah comes as a fulfilment of a long-held promise. The book will delight admirers of both authors with its intertextual interplay as well as a fresh exploration of the differences and similarities between a cleric and an occultist. Knight has described the book as an "organic process, almost an initiation, that has left me with a somewhat expanded consciousness." Readers are invited to share in the various machinations that sparked this dynamic relationship - one that keeps on giving.

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Product details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Skylight Press (31 Oct 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1908011688
  • ISBN-13: 978-1908011688
  • Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 15.2 x 1.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 195,164 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
I was lucky enough to read the main subject of this book, the late Rev. Anthony Duncan, way back in the day, when I first started out on this esoteric caper - in fact before I read any Gareth Knight. This was due to the local Theosophical Society Library holding a copy of his The Christ, Psychotherapy and Magic. Even though I was immersed in and espousing my newly adopted Pagan `faith', the book touched me deeply and I daresay held me fast during many years of theological speculation and confusion.

Far from being an ordinary village or city Anglican vicar, the Rev. Duncan was also a mystic of great depth, a lover of faeries, a part-time ghost-buster, a natural psychic and a wonderful exponent of the esoteric truths behind Christianity. The Church of England occasionally throws up such a soul, but rarely do they flourish within and outside the bounds of the Church as Rev. Duncan did.

On the outer reaches of the Church one only has to look at his classic The Elements of Celtic Christianity which had wide appeal back in the 90s, even within a Perth Pagan audience :) Within the church one can look at his long career as a parish priest, the respect he garnered and one or two more `out there' moments. Take for example, his authorship of the clergy-only document The Psychic Disturbance of Places describing a rationale for psychic disruptions of places, ghosts and place memories and how a priest may assist in their resolution (which somehow made it past the church's Doctrine Commission).

Christ & Qabalah, by the respected elder of English Magic, Gareth Knight, traces the meeting and esoteric interaction of ideas and works between himself and Rev Duncan.
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Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful memoir of a friendship which changed western esotericism 10 Dec 2013
By John P. Plummer - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
The friendship of magician Gareth Knight and priest Anthony Duncan made an enormous mark on the western esoteric tradition, through their influence upon each other. They always intended to write a book together, but Duncan died in 2003. Knight is now making good on that intention, with this fine book which is a memoir of their friendship, mixed with reflection on spiritual issues which arose in their dialogue. Knight has also included a broad selection of Duncan's beautiful poetry, much of it previously available only in small, private editions. This is a very rich volume, which I read slowly and to which I will doubtless return many times.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unique - useful for all students of magic and depth Christianity 23 Dec 2013
By P E Wildoak - Published on Amazon.com
I was lucky enough to read the main subject of this book, the late Rev. Anthony Duncan, way back in the day, when I first started out on this esoteric caper – in fact before I read any Gareth Knight. This was due to the local Theosophical Society Library holding a copy of his The Christ, Psychotherapy and Magic. Even though I was immersed in and espousing my newly adopted Pagan ‘faith’, the book touched me deeply and I daresay held me fast during many years of theological speculation and confusion.

Far from being an ordinary village or city Anglican vicar, the Rev. Duncan was also a mystic of great depth, a lover of faeries, a part-time ghost-buster, a natural psychic and a wonderful exponent of the esoteric truths behind Christianity. The Church of England occasionally throws up such a soul, but rarely do they flourish within and outside the bounds of the Church as Rev. Duncan did.

On the outer reaches of the Church one only has to look at his classic The Elements of Celtic Christianity which had wide appeal back in the 90s, even within a Perth Pagan audience :) Within the church one can look at his long career as a parish priest, the respect he garnered and one or two more ‘out there’ moments. Take for example, his authorship of the clergy-only document The Psychic Disturbance of Places describing a rationale for psychic disruptions of places, ghosts and place memories and how a priest may assist in their resolution (which somehow made it past the church’s Doctrine Commission).

Christ & Qabalah, by the respected elder of English Magic, Gareth Knight, traces the meeting and esoteric interaction of ideas and works between himself and Rev Duncan. One can imagine that two innovators within their respective spiritual fields would have much to say to one another, much to spark off each other and much to gain from each other’s depth. Without being unduly intimate, Gareth Knight’s sharing of correspondence, diary entries and poems allows the reader to enter a wonderful and intensely personal relationship. As he describes, even though the two lived in the same town for only a short time as young men, afterwards they were ‘seldom out of each other’s heads’.

Knight recounts their relationship in a largely chronological manner, allowing the development of ideas and works, the refinement of beliefs and practices of each other to be clearly shown. This book is far more than a simple sketch of the life of Rev. Duncan; Knight draws out, places in context and shows how each influenced the other and the ramifications of their work for the greater esoteric and ‘post-Church’ worlds. His writing, as always, is clear, engaging and attractive, here with the addition of personal elements and anecdotes, as the author is quite happy to present the differences between himself and Rev. Duncan when they arose.

The great strength of the book is the snapshot into the diversity and depth of the work of Rev. Duncan, and also (when he elaborates on it) the work of Gareth Knight. Duncan is revealed as a man of great depth and mystic awareness, a (literally) inspired writer and proficient poet.

“Myself (of which I make so great
a fuss) is a mere, brittle spike
of consciousness on the circumference of being;
a tiny terminal of unplumbed depth". (‘ME’, p.7)

and

“Our being falls towards this point
Where all the lines converge” (‘NIRVANA POINT’, p.35).

Or in a more elemental mood:

“Sprits of wood and water, stone and field,
whom my sophistication disallows, yet abide
and creep beneath my carapace. I know you well;” (‘DEVELOPMENT’, p152).

There are many aspects to Duncan’s work and ideas that could easily be labelled ‘Pagan’, his deep faerie and land connection for instance. And the influence of Gareth Knight, steering him towards the Qabalah, produced material which may easily be called ‘magical’ by some people. However, the book shows that throughout it all Duncan was clear and insistent on the need for a Christocentric view of the occult and the hidden dimensions. He was devout in only the way those who have gone to the very depth of their traditions, seeing the Mystery clearly, eye to eye, can be. For Duncan, nature revealed the ‘grandeur of God’ (as Knight aptly summed it up in the words of the poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins) but was not God in toto. And as for magic and esoteric theories:

“…magic, the art of making consciousness in accordance with the will, is a ‘lower pyramid’ exercise only. Its fulfilment is in Christ – but then it is no longer magic!” (p.93)

and

“Christians believe, not in avatars or incarnations, but in The Incarnation. “The Word became flesh and dwelt among us” as a Person of that One Creature, Mankind. The integrity of the one and the many – and the One – are all bound up inextricably. Mankind is a Love Affair…We have hardly begun to think about the implications of The Incarnation for Mankind. It is easier to waffle on about theology, or “incarnations” or vague “cosmics” of one sort or another, while Godhead lies, like a time-bomb in our midst.” (p.139)

The book reveals however that Rev Duncan fully and firmly accepted the reality of the inner worlds, the faeries, reincarnation, psychic power and other mainstays of the occult. He also simply accepted the core Christian doctrine that despite our best efforts we sin (move away from the One) and only with the grace of the One (through Christ) can we hope to begin to ‘want to want God’. Our own efforts, such as his definition of magic, described in quotation above, are bound to fail. These and other aspects of the Christian tradition, which remained core to his understanding of the world, are described and explored well in the book (and in some of Gareth Knight’s other works). They remain and challenge and an opportunity for all modern students of western magic, and as such this book is ideally suited for anyone interested in magic, the occult or the deeper sides of Christianity. It is as unique as the two men, the two soul friends, who produced it. Highly recommended.
5.0 out of 5 stars Memoir of a Remarkable Relationship 11 Jan 2014
By Michael K. Kivinen - Published on Amazon.com
This newly-published collaboration between Gareth Knight and the late Canon Anthony Duncan is a memoir of the remarkable relationship between an Anglican priest (Duncan) and an initiate of the Western Mysteries (Knight). Their reciprocal influence produced a remarkable series of books, including Duncan's "The Christ, Psychotherapy, and Magic: A Christian Appreciation of Occultism" and the essentially channeled work "The Lord of the Dance," as well as Knight's indispensable "Experience of the Inner Worlds." "Christ and Qabalah" extends and elaborates the chapter called "The Lord of The Dance" in Knight's 2011 autobiography, "I Called it Magic." It serves not only as an autobiographical account of a long and mutually formative friendship but also as an anthology of the Rev. Duncan's poetry, much of which reflects his mysticism and psychic sensitivity. Highly recommended!
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