Trade in Yours
For a 0.25 Gift Card
Trade in
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Tell the Publisher!
Id like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Children of the Revolution: Communist Childhood in Cold War Britain [Paperback]

Gillian Slovo , Phil Cohen
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Available from these sellers.


Trade In this Item for up to 0.25
Trade in Children of the Revolution: Communist Childhood in Cold War Britain for an Amazon Gift Card of up to 0.25, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

30 April 1997
This is a record of the experiences of children of Communist Party parents brought up in 1950s Britain. They grew up in a unique micro-environment dominated by a faith in the world that was semi-religious, based on hope rather than reason. Through a set of interviews, Phil Cohen dissects the value system that dominated these families. He explores how being communist made many children feel isolated from their school mates, and how they were often made to feel secondary to political activity. This generation went onto experience the political and cultural excitement of the 1960s, often coming into conflict with parents who were, fundamentally, conservative. They wanted to change the world, but not to reproduce the Soviet Union. Many of them now hold influential positions, and in this book they discuss how their childhoods have affected their current attitudes. Interviews are conducted with: Michael Rosen, Hywel Francis, Alexi Sayle, Martin Jones, Jackie Kaye, Martin Kettle, Carole Woddis, Anne Kane, Jude Bloomfield, Pat Devine, Mike Power and Nina Temple. Phil Cohen is the author of "It Ain't Half Racist Mum" and "Tobacco: Face the Facts".

Product details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Lawrence & Wishart Ltd (30 April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 085315841X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0853158417
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 13.7 x 1.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 351,531 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
From the day in August 1949 that my parents named me after Phil Piratin, who was then a Communist MP, I was probably fated to produce a book like this. Read the first page
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

5 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
4.0 out of 5 stars
4.0 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting account of growing up an outsider 18 April 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is an interesting book. It suffers some what from lack of structure but that is to some extent a reflection of the methodology chosen which is personal accounts of growing up as children of Communist Party members. The most interesting aspects for me are the way in which it exposes how hypocritcal and self deluding people can be and also the effect for children of growing up as outsiders from society as a result of the choices their parents had made. What also comes through however is the profound way many of these children have benefited in adult life from the critical framework of a Marxist perspective. It is also interesting to me the comments on the Stalinist structures of the Communist party and how profoundly flawed they are and yet left wing groups still seek to self impose these structures instead of recognising that the left ought to be the place for honest debate.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback