Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Children of Other Worlds: Exploitation in the Global Market Hardcover – 20 Apr 2001

1 customer review

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£91.99 £36.55



Product details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Press (20 April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745313965
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745313962
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 14 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,612,125 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"London-based journalist, Jeremy Seabrook, who has written widely on labor, Asia and the sex trade, compares child labor in contemporary Bangladesh with that of industrial Britain the 19th century. By including extensive testimonials from Bangladeshi children, he illustrated many disturbing similarities in the mills and factories of the two nations - in the exodus to the city, social attitudes to poverty, and the absolute necessity of child labor to supplement inadequate family income. Seabrook questions whether the need for child labor will ever be eliminated in this part of the world, given that the region does not have the same historical means of creating wealth that the industrialized world had." -- Publisher's Weekly"One of the most emotive of the exploitation issues concerns child labour and this is the subject of a detailed account by Jeremy Seabrook in this book. However, rather than tackling the issue on a broad front and dispersing the force of his argument, he concentrates on drawing a comparison with modern day Bangladesh and the "dark satanic mills" of the industrial revolution, where child labour was an accepted part of the workforce. Seabrook points out that the arguments trotted out 200 years ago to defend such abuses have - the market demands it, if we didn't do it someone else would - have echoes today... [He] has crafted an informative tale of the darker side of capitalism. His empathy for the children he meets shines through, although his restrained anger is evident. Excellent." -- Irish Times

About the Author

Jeremy Seabrook is a journalist and writer. He has written for the New Statesman, Guardian, Times and Independent. He writes plays for stage and TV and is the author of numerous books including Pauperland: Poverty and the Poor in Britain (Hurst, 2013) and The Song of the Shirt: The High Price of Cheap Garments, from Blackburn to Bangladesh (Hurst, 2015).

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S Wood on 16 Mar. 2014
Format: Paperback
Jeremy Seabrook's "Children of Other Worlds: Exploitation in the Global Market" (2001) is an innovative look at poverty in the modern world. The innovation consists of a comparative element in the book, namely comparing the experience of children in 19th Britain with those in late 20th century Bangladesh. To paint a picture of the British experience Seabrook turns to the work of such writers as the Hammonds (The Rise Of Modern Industry), Henry Mayhew (London Labour and the London Poor) and E.P.Thompson (The Making of the English Working Class) amongst others, as well as government reports and the memoirs of those who lived through the period. For Bangladesh, Seabrook relies on his own observations from extensive visits made their during the 1990's. The similarities and contrasts between the two times and two places make for some thoughtful and interesting reading.

Child labour is obviously the central subject of this book, and Seabrook's observations on it go farther than the child labour bad, education good dichotomy that was the discourse of many well intentioned people in NGO's at the time the book was written, to looking at the whole phenomena at a variety of levels.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Cure the Source 16 July 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This ethnography served to not only shed light on the horror that is child labor, but it also served as a reality check. Child labor is terrible but the alternatives are worse. The revelation afforded by this ethnography is that laws against child labor do not solve the problem. Children will only find a new way to secure money. The new alternatives are worse and include begging, stealing, and/or prostitution. In fact, child labor is often their only way of survival.
Working Children in Victorian Britain and Late Twentieth Century Bangladesh 16 Mar. 2014
By S Wood - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Jeremy Seabrook's "Children of Other Worlds: Exploitation in the Global Market" (2001) is an innovative look at poverty in the modern world. The innovation consists of a comparative element in the book, namely comparing the experience of children in 19th Britain with those in late 20th century Bangladesh. To paint a picture of the British experience Seabrook turns to the work of such writers as the Hammonds (The Rise Of Modern Industry), Henry Mayhew (London Labour and the London Poor) and E.P.Thompson (The Making of the English Working Class) amongst others, as well as government reports and the memoirs of those who lived through the period. For Bangladesh, Seabrook relies on his own observations from extensive visits made their during the 1990's. The similarities and contrasts between the two times and two places make for some thoughtful and interesting reading.

Child labour is obviously the central subject of this book, and Seabrook's observations on it go farther than the child labour bad, education good dichotomy that was the discourse of many well intentioned people in NGO's at the time the book was written, to looking at the whole phenomena at a variety of levels. Given Bangladesh's position in the Global economy, in no small measure a legacy of its past as a part of the British Empire (and a part that was brutally deindustrialised during the last half of the 18th century) it becomes unavoidable for families to survive by counting on their children's contributions to the household budget, or if they are apprenticed out (something that was common in Britain during the early 19th century) the child would, hopefully, be acquiring a useful trade, and at any rate would be getting food and board at no expense to the family. At the level of each individual child, while many have a aspirations to become educated, there is also a deal of pride that they are bringing in an income of sorts and helping their families to survive.

The book contains numerous accounts from the children themselves, Seabrook is an able and sensitive interviewer, and spends a deal of time with the children concerned at home, in the streets and at their places of work. The picture painted of existence in a poorly developed third world country is vivid, and the complexities of that existence are made crystal clear. The comparisons made with Britain are also very interesting, and also a stark warning to those who wish to blame child labour in Bangladesh on the peoples religion or race.

Definitely a book well worth reading, even though it doesn't provide all the answers to the child labour phenomena, it will at least provide a vivid, thoughtful and intelligent insight into the subject itself.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
thoughtful and disturbing 8 May 2004
By Lisa S. Parham - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
this book is thoughtful and disturbing; it has research that may seem dry at times, but when you consider the human cost behind the numbers, it is horrifying. the author opens discussions about child labor and abuse within the context of social mores that are fascinating; then leaves the reader to decide for herself. well worth the read although i found myself unable even more convinced that child labor is a crime against humanity that must be stopped.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback