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Children of Dune (Dune Chronicles Book 3) Hardcover – Apr 1976

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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Putnam Adult; Book Club (BCE/BOMC) edition (April 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399116974
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399116971
  • Product Dimensions: 50.8 x 50.8 x 50.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,196,753 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

?Ranging from palace intrigue and desert chases to religious speculation and confrontations with the supreme intelligence of the universe, there is something here for all science fiction fans.? ?"Publishers Weekly" ?Herbert adds enough new twists and turns to the ongoing saga that familiarity with the recurring elements brings pleasure.? ?"Challenging Destiny" --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

The epic that began with the HUGO and NEBULA Award-winning classic DUNE continues ... --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Sharon Williams on 15 Oct. 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Five stars for the book itself, 3rd in the series and an impressive bit of Sci-Fi, my favourite after the first book.

However, this kindle edition is very poor indeed. The conversion has been done very badly, and Gollancz have obviously not bothered to proof read the text at all. The spelling errors, incorrect words (bad character recognition in the conversion?), repeated or missed paragraphs is terrible and actually impinges on your ability to read the book properly. So at this point I would not recommend buying this version until they sort it out and do the corrections !!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D Brookes on 15 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
The third in the Dune series caps off an insular trilogy in the sequence of novels, bringing an end to the Paul Muad'dib / children of Dune generation. Paul's two children, awakened before birth, are so interesting you'll be desperate to see what they'll turn into, and how the offspring of the 'Messiah' of Dune will change the planet.

The writing remains beyond excellent, with the surviving original characters continuing to change and evolve. Nothing feels stale even in this third book. The new characters are compelling, even the initially dislikable Corrino heir who we realise exists as a stark contrast to the ruthless Feyd of the earlier stories, and whose plight becomes more sympathetic as the story draws on.

Although the pace of this book is slower than the first two, it is made up for by the brilliant evolution of Leto II, Paul's son, and the subsequent cataclysm.

Very sophisticated if not quite as exciting, this one remains a must if you've read the earlier instalments and provides true closure for the story. It also sets up the peculiar yet brilliant fourth book, "God Emperor of Dune", which is also unmissable.

7.5 / 10

David Brookes
Author of "Half Discovered Wings"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Blackbeard on 23 Nov. 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book more than makes up for the second one, which was too short and lacked the structure and depth of the first one. This is my favorite book in the series (although I don't remember the next three and don't have them at the moment) because it contains the most wisdom and because it goes farthest in exploring the possibilities in the universe the author created. The intrigues between the various parties grow more complex, the structure of the various powers become clearer, and the characters continue to grow and become more intriguing. What's great about this series is that almost all of the characters and powers represented have their own philosophies and wisdom, and they are pretty much all reasonable and deep. I don't know how much of the philosophy is borrowed or if it was all the author's own, but the way it is expressed gives much food for thought, and it is a pleasure to read. I would encourage anyone who liked the first book to continue reading this series, and if they were disappointed by the second one, I think they will be pleasantly surprised by the third.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 15 Feb. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I thoroughly enjoyed Children of Dune, especially after Dune Messiah left me yearning for more due to it being all too brief.
However the Gollancz edition shown here is marred by a poor typeset (letters seem to be stuttered horizontally) and a large number of spelling errors which occur frequently, sometimes in the same sentence.
This leads to such faults as main character Leto being referred to as letoh or letoe in some sentences. A minor quibble I am sure but one which the publisher could have resolved before publication.
Sadly it appears Gollancz have the rights to the remaining novels and I only hope they are better proof read. Herbert's majestic epic deserves more than a tawdry cheap copy run.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Jones on 6 Oct. 2004
Format: Paperback
The continued story of the Dune saga follows, chiefly, the exploits of Paul Atriedes' sister, Alia, and his two children, Leto II and Ghanima, as the empire that he created begins to tumble. This is definitely a book about House Atriedes as its main concern is evidently the relationships between the surviving members of this family, their retainers and servants. There are sources of conflict from outside the family -- House Corrino's attempt to regain the throne, frex -- but these are dealt with early and it leaves the book at times feeling slightly off balanced.
Plot threads are seemingly forgotten for long stretches and it's only when certain characters are referred to that you realise you haven't seen or heard from them in a hundred pages or so. I can see why this happens; if it's not going to advance the plot, themes or characterisation in any way, then its pointless including scenes with these characters if they aren't actually doing anything. Unfortunately, this does mean that the last chunk of the book centres almost entirely around Leto II and what he's playing around with. This, coupled with the fact that sometimes months pass between scenes without much by way of comment, means that you do feel like you're losing track of what's happening.
That said, I liked this better than Dune Messiah, which I found to be just a little too short, a little too . . . easy. Whilst this book is a bit heavy and thoughtful at times -- I've read enough about Leto II debating the spice trance by now, thank you very much -- it's not enough to dissuade me or make me loathe to pick it up again each time I stop.
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