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Chicago 18 Import


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According to Billboard chart statistics, Chicago is second only to the Beach Boys as the most successful American rock band of all time, in terms of both albums and singles. Judged by album sales alone, as certified by the R.I.A.A., the band does not rank quite so high, but it is still among the Top Ten best-selling U.S. groups ever. If such statements of fact surprise, that's because ... Read more in Amazon's Chicago Store

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Product details

  • Audio CD (25 Oct 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Warner
  • ASIN: B000002LAL
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 133,174 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Niagra Falls
2. Forever
3. If She Would Have Been Faithful
4. 25 Or 6 To 4
5. Will You Still Love Me?
6. Over And Over
7. It's Alright
8. Interlude (Horns)
9. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now
10. I Believe
11. One More Day

Product Description

Chicago ~ Chicago 18

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Mar 2005
Format: Audio CD
Don't get me wrong - I've been a chicago fan since 92. But this album sounds like a musical bad dream put on tape, the concept album that every artist harbours in his heart but dreads to put out. Now we know why... compressed and synthesised beyond belief, more echo than the channel tunnel, hardly any of chicagos throaty and powerful brass comes through without sounding like it has been passed through a Yamaha keyboard. The lyrics are repetitive and unorigional and the only cheer goes to the reworking of 25-or-6-to-4 - amazingly good on an album that overall really really sucks. Chicago 17, 19, and Night and Day are far better as is anything up to Chicago 16 (with the exception of 8)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JC1 on 8 Feb 2009
Format: Audio CD
This was the first Chicago release without Peter Cetera. His replacement Jason Scheff has become an integral part of the band since but his first offering is not his best. The album tries too hard to replicate 17, and fails. Having said that there are some good tracks and I like the remake of 25or6to4. The biggest issue with this re-issue is where are the bonus tracks? Unless you don't have this on CD there is no reason to buy it!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Jelly Bean on 3 Oct 2006
Format: Audio CD
When I bought this album (thats right album-vinyl) I was unawere that Peter Cetera had left the band, infact this was my first Chicago album and wasn't too familar with Peters vocal style, the new singer Robert Lamm had a very simlar style so the record still had the Chicago sound I enjoied it very much, stand out songs are "Niagra Falls", and the fantastic "If she would have been faithful", you also get a very 80's sounding re-recording of "25 or 6 to 4" thrown in for good measure, all in all it's a great cd despite no Peter Cetera.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 44 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
The Long Road To Loving Chicago 18 30 Jun 2006
By Gord o' The Books - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
When I first bought Chicago 18 in 1986 (just about the day it came out), I was anticipating a rebound from 17, which I thought was a little too vanilla at the time. I hoped for something more like 16 - the 80s, techno Chicago, except that I was hoping that after two or three albums we would finally have a decent trombone or trumpet solo a la Chicago III or V. I KNEW that Chicago could put the jazz and brass into their 80s sound, and couldn't figure out why neither they nor David Foster had figured it out yet. And I still had hopes that something more like the Kath approach to guitar would finally be discovered (and that there would not be this corps of studio guitarists).

But - I was like a lot of Chicago fans that were so absorbed in what we thought Chicago had to sound like (we wanted CTA over and over again), that we failed to hear good music and to realize that, yes, this was Chicago, too.

What I saw and heard broke my heart. I listened to it maybe only once or twice. I hated the picture - what was all this Hollywood glitz clothing (dressing like 25 years olds instead of the middle-aged guys they had become). I wondered where Peter Cetera was. And for some reason - the sound really disappointed me. This was the album that caused me to give up on Chicago for over ten years (I came back after hearing, and loving, the Christmas album).

Cut to 1999 - when I finally bought the CD and listened to it anew, with a renewed appreciation for Bill Champlin and the post-Kath/Cetera sound. I find this album to be one of the most enjoyable listens of all of their albums. It does not have a true standout song, but the entire album heard at once, is a unique experience. Each song folds cleanly into the next. The 25 or 6 to 4 is a little detour in the middle of the ballads. The sax solo on Forever is a welcome addition. Free Flight has an almost comical "Hey, we're still here!" feel. I personally believe that Side Two (cuts 6 thru 10) is among Chicago's best Sides Two. It is possibly even better than V's Side Two. Over and Over, and It's Alright are dynamite back-to-back cuts.

Chicago 18 may be an acquired taste to many die-hard Chicago fans. You have to get beyond thoughts of Terry and Peter being gone, and get used to the idea of, "yes, it's Chicago." Enjoy this legendary band in all of it's flavors.

Pop music collectors should love this Chicago effort - which, as Chicago XI did for their second Guercio Era, shows them at the top of their craft, during the Foster Era. But it is not as good as 16, and Jason is still learning the ropes, so I give it just 4-stars.
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Hindsight is 20/20! 22 Oct 2007
By Jim Kelsey - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
"Chicago 18" came out the in September of the same year that I graduated from high school, 1986. During high school, I played trumpet in the concert band and piano in jazz band. I was introduced to Chicago via the radio when "17" hit the charts in 1984; moreso, when my brother bought the album and I got a chance to listen to the entire thing. What drew me to them was the brass. Not only could they play fast, but Lee Loughnane could play high, which is any trumpet player's aspiration - the higher the better, especially when you're a kid (any trumpet players out there laughing? "Maynard" your childhood hero?) Chicago was also my band director's favorite band. He got me listening to the older albums - so I purchased "Chicago V," a greatest hits album, "16," and when eventually all of his albums from "V" through "13."

When I first heard "18" on the radio in the fall of 1986, I was devastated. What was this new sound? It wasn't the Chicago I listened to in high school. I hated it! Fortunately, a college education in music and twenty years of hindsight have softened my tone. It really wasn't as bad as I had thought and I own both the LP and CD and totally enjoy listening to the songs.

"Chicago 18" was Chicago's third installment with producer David Foster. Foster again brought in a host of studio musicians, including Steve Lukather from Toto and tunes written by many outside sources. The album spawned three hits: "Will You Still Love Me" which went #3 in the fall of 1986; the lesser known "Niagra Falls," which peaked at #91 during the summer of 1987; and "If She Would Have Been Faithful," which got up to #17 in October of 1987.

On the whole, the approach is a new direction towards more synth pop/drums and less emphasis on the brass and jazz influences. Most of the tunes follow the typical 1980's pop format - likeable melodies, catchy choruses, and lots of electronics - not much acoustic here (except for the brass). Since nothing unique stands out, both in the arrangments of the songs and performance by the musicians, I can't give it five stars.

My favorite tunes are written by veteran's of the band: Robert Lamm's "Forever" and James Pankow's "One More Day." "Forever" is an awesomely written song about commitment in a relationship/marriage and perhaps has the best saxophone solo ever performed by Walter Parazaider. The brass solis on both tunes are also equally impressive- in fact, if you're a "17" fan, they're similar to the one on "Once in a Lifetime." Outside of those two tunes, the brass really play a minor role - one that reaches it's unfortunate demise on their following album.

Two items that I must mention because of the bad press they receive are the addition of Jason Scheff, who replaced lead singer Peter Cetera, and the remake of "25 or 6 to 4." It is this reviewer's opinion that Scheff has done a great job filling the void of high tenor/bass. He's a fine song writer, plays equally as well on bass as Cetera did, and also has a strong, clear voice. I would not call him a Jaco Pastorius, for those bass fans, but he more-than fills the job.

As far as the remake of "25," when I was a teenager I hated it. As a musical purist, if it had been any other group, I still would hate it. However, being that Robert Lamm and James Pankow, both still members of Chicago, wrote the tune and approved of the changes, who am I to talk? Didn't the major classical composers revise their own pieces and are still respected? Richard Wagner rewrote Tannhauser for the Paris opera some twenty years after it's initial production; Rachmaninoff altered his entire 2nd piano sonata because the first version was unplayable except by the most technically talented; Robert Schumann his 2nd piano sonata, because his wife Clara, a concert pianist, declared that the 4th movement was too difficult (incidentally, I performed both sonatas when I was in college). I still like the original better primarily because Terry Kath's guitar solo is so extraordinary and unusual.

In conclusion, if you're new to Chicago and looking to explore new territory, this is a start, but not what I'd call the definitive Chicago. If you want that, definitely do not start with a greatest hits album! Start with the original "CTA" album, then listen to "II," "VII," and "17." I'd even recommend "Twenty 1." After that, you'll have a good idea of their sound and can start filling in the holes.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
The ultimate "80's" Chicago? 17 Oct 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
David Foster's 3rd (and final) hi-tech CHICAGO album continued the trend of overproduced synthesized ballads & rockers. At the time of its release, this was my favorite of the 3 "new sound" albums. Much lyrics reflect not only society of the day, but seemed like a "soundtrack" for my OWN life-- that can be spooky when it happens! "As long as Niagara Falls..." (cute play on words), "Forever" (lamenting high divorce rates) and "If She Would Have Been Faithful" (life can have unexpected twists) only serve as a warm-up for 18's one-two punch. A trend that started in the mid-80's was hi-tech remakes of "classic rock" tunes-- in the case of "25 Or 6 To 4", CHICAGO must have figured they'd beat anyone else to doing it first! The first time I heard this, I KNEW many fans would consider it the musical equivalent of sacrilege-- but I LIKED it! It was almost a single-- but at the last minute, sanity prevailed and the intended flip side got pushed instead. What can I say? "Will You Still Love Me?" is my FAVORITE of all the slow love ballads they ever did!! It affected me emotionally for years (I guess I just related to it an awful lot!) The rest of the album's not bad, either-- "Over And Over" and the upbeat rocker "It's Alright" add a lot of zip, while "One More Day", with its optimism and children's chorus seems to have wandered in from an Earth Wind & Fire album. CHICAGO 18 is still a cool listen!
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
The start of another dry spell for Chicago. 1 Nov 2006
By Michael G. Hoelen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this album thinking it would be just as good as Chicago 16 or 17, but I was wrong. The sound on this album was so not them. When Peter Cetera left the band to pursue a solo career, it's almost like he took the magic with him. However there are some great songs on this album like "Niagra Falls", "Will You Still Love Me?", and "Over and Over". The remake of "25 or 6 to 4" should've been aborted. I never thought in a million years that a band could butcher one of their own songs (a classic at that), man was I wrong. This is why I gave this album 3 stars.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
You BET it's good. 19 Feb 2006
By J. B. Christian - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
When held up next to Chicago 17, 19, or Twenty 1, Chicago 18 looks very dark and brooding in comparison.

It's rather refreshing.

From the open, with Niagara Falls, it becomes clear that this album is not a 'pick-me-upper' as 17 was. Niagara Falls is a very somber song with a driving beat, which seems to jump ahead of itself in its anticipation as the vocals overlap. Splendid effort on Jason Scheff's part. The album proceeds through Forever, an elegant Robert Lamm work, and then If She Would Have Been Faithful, which (along with Will You Still Love Me?) doesn't seem to fit with the industrialized sound of the remainder of the album. The sound fits well with the more sleek voice of Jason, the newcomer to replace Peter Cetera.

As for the atrocious cover of 25 or 6 to 4, it sounds like one of the boys said to the other, "You know what? Let's do the song like Genesis would if they did it!" Think about it. The drum machine sounds strikingly familiar to something off Invisible Touch.

Then is Will You Still Love Me? which once again doesn't fit with the somber, machined feel of the album, but is never the less a fantastic song.

The rest of the album is largely uneventful. Nothin's Gonna Stop Us Now is nice, and the Horn Interlude is odd, at best. But One More Day has a good message and a terribly placed childrens' choir.

All in all, a great effort from Chicago, and an excellent follow-up. For every ounce of pep and vigor in Chicago 17, there is contemplation and commentary in 18, a welcome change in my eyes.
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