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Che Puro Ciel: The Rise of Classical Opera
 
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Che Puro Ciel: The Rise of Classical Opera

28 Oct 2013 | Format: MP3

7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 13.25 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:06
30
2
1:46
30
3
4:33
30
4
5:01
30
5
3:17
30
6
4:32
30
7
1:58
30
8
6:45
30
9
7:47
30
10
5:08
30
11
3:43
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12
5:00
30
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3:27
30
14
1:23
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15
9:19


Product details

  • Label: harmonia mundi
  • Copyright: (c) 2013 harmonia mundi
  • Total Length: 1:09:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00FWY89SE
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 100,045 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Abert on 20 Mar 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The selection in Bejun Mehta’s new solo album with Harmonic Mundi contains works from Gluck (Orfeo and Ezio), Traetta (Antigona and Ifigenia in Tauride), Mozart (Ascanio in Alba and Mitridate), JC Bach (Artaserse) and Hasse (Il Trionfo del Clelia). The contents of this album reflect the operatic music of which W.A. Mozart would have known as a teenager.
First the less good news - the title cut — Gluck's Orfeo, proves the only less-than-compelling piece on the disc. I have listened and re-listened to this track many times to decipher the cause, for I have more confidence in Mehta’s singing as most other reviewers put it. Is it because that this particular part of the role doesn't match Mehta’s best tessitura? Why does his scale works here sounds less even than in the rest of the program? The fact that the solo vocal line constantly sings against a less than well-tuned accompaniment (recorders, I gather) provides not insubstantial obstacle to an accurate perception of Mehta’s singing: there is really no pitch problem with Mehta, just that the constant dissonance with that instrument provides great distraction to the ears of the listeners (listen to the opening introduction before Mehta sings: the dissonance and pitch problem of the recorder is already there). These have a more devastating effect on the perception of the entire album than the producer might have realised.
The better news are that the music contains real treasures like the dialogue between Orestes and a chorus of Furies in Traetta's 1763 Ifigenia en Tauride, with Mehta as Oreste. The rarely heard Traetta, who spent part of his career in musically remote St. Petersburg, are really the biggest find here. Here as elsewhere in this album, Mehta’s variety of attack, musical phrasing and precision in dynamics compel admiration.
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