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Charles Ives: Symphony No.2
 
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Charles Ives: Symphony No.2

Leonard Bernstein & New York Philharmonic Orchestra
18 Feb 2014 | Format: MP3

£8.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
6:16
30
2
11:04
30
3
11:41
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4
3:05
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5
10:05
30
6
2:16
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7
3:16
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8
3:43
30
9
1:56
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10
7:10
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11
6:07


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 5 Jun 1990
  • Release Date: 5 Jun 1990
  • Label: Decca (UMO)
  • Copyright: (C) 1990 Deutsche Grammophon GmbH, Hamburg
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:06:39
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B005KV2LI8
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 133,016 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Peter Biddlecombe VINE VOICE on 8 April 2010
Format: Audio CD
This collection of Ive's pieces is, for me, one of Bernstein's best recordings. Symphony No. 2 starts seeming like Brahms or Schumann with an American accent, but gradually adds the twists that make Ives different. The other pieces are an interesting collection of shorter works, with Central Park in the Dark and The Unanswered Question the best known of these. All are performed with plenty of life, but as far as I can tell without the extremes of interpretation for which Bernstein is sometimes criticised.
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By Amazon Customer TOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 July 2013
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
Leonard Bernstein's final recording of the Ives Second, despite being more expansive overall gains more than it loses. Famed as it is for its final chord and the popular American themes it is, for the most part, a very well behaved Germanic symphony that owed much to Ives' teacher. Ives was on best behaviour, using academic fugues and counterpoint rooted in the nineteenth century. The way the symphony ends shows the composer desperate to break free of this.

Bernstein brings out more the connections with Mahler as much as the more obviously links to Brahms and Dvorak. An overall more expansive approach also allowed Bernstein to attack and accelerate most effectively when needed. Kenneth Schermerhorn's faithfulness to the score on Naxos sounds stiff and lifeless in comparison. The closing pages here are breathtaking - not just the famed final chord.

What follows immediately is "The Gong on the Hook" whose modernism mixes with the vernacular just as the symphony mixes the Germanic tradition with vernacular. This time though, the shackles are off. The same goes for the following pieces though I must admit I've heard more atmospheric versions of "The Unanswered Question" and "Central Park In the Dark".

Reservations aside these live performances are recorded very well and the main event; the symphony; is a great success.
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