Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
A Century of State Murder... has been added to your Basket
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Century of State Murder?: Death and Policy in Twentieth Century Russia Paperback – 20 Aug 2003

3 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£18.99
£10.30 £6.20
£18.99 FREE Delivery in the UK. In stock. Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Save £20 on Amazon.co.uk with the aqua Classic card. Get an initial credit line of £250-£1,200 and build your credit rating. Representative 32.9% APR (variable). Subject to term and conditions. Learn more.



Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Pluto Press (20 Aug. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0745319300
  • ISBN-13: 978-0745319308
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.8 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,790,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"The issue of 'mass murder' is creeping higher and higher up the agenda and, not least in connection with the mounting tide of anti-globalization, and this book is exactly on the button as far as this expanding area of controversy is concerned" Professor Andrew Reeve (Warwick University)

About the Author

Mike Haynes lectures in economic history at the University of Wolverhampton.

Rumy Husan lectures on the transition economies with reference to emerging economies at the University of Leeds.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Germinal TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 23 Mar. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an excellent book. Easy to read. A tight theoretical framework on which evidence is hung and which is used to make sense of that evidence.

Haymes and Husan eschew the more traditional ways of looking at why people died in, for example, the famines of the 1930's which concentrated, in a somewhat blinkered fashion, on ideology at the expense of other factors. As such, they open up new vistas of understanding on such events.

Haynes and Husan look at why so many people have died in events of mass mortality in Russia over the past century, pre Revolution, civil war era, Stalinist era, post Stalin era and the post-'Soviet' era. Their concentration on the effects on mortality of the shock doctrine applied to Russian society after the collapse of the USSR is especially enlightening.

Their conclusion is that they have been the victims of systems of class based exploitation, including war. All sorts of ideas from sociology, psychology, economics, politics, demography and health analysis are interwoven within an overall Marxist understanding of society as a place where dominant social classes exploit and oppress other social classes. It's an impressive synthesis and demonstrates the continued vitality of Marxist analysis.

Sad thing is though, such a book will be barely read and discussed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By F Henwood TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 11 Dec. 2011
Format: Paperback
`The death of one is a tragedy; the death of millions is a statistic', as the saying attributed to Stalin goes. Twentieth Century Russian (or Soviet) history can certainly offer some grim statistics, with tens of millions of excess deaths produced by a combination of social upheavals and catastrophes. Russian history has often been the staple of moralists on the political right, so this book is unusual in my experience by being written by two anti-Stalinist left-wingers, clearly sympathetic to the aims of the initial aims of the Bolsheviks in their ambition to transform Russia into a classless society.

The authors offer a solid analysis of the history of mass deaths in Russia during the 20th Century. The writers chart four episodes of mass deaths during the 20th Century: the first episode being the First World War, the Revolution and civil war and famine and its aftermath. The second, Stalinist repression and forced industrialisation in the 1930s, the third, the Second World War and, finally, the fourth and most recent, the demographic catastrophe of the transition to capitalism in the 1990s (with the two wars in Chechnya thrown in). The thread underlying the theme has been the role of the state in either deliberately killing its citizens or allowing to them to die en masse as a result of failed policy. The authors reject the premise that the Soviet Union was a socialist society, offering convincing evidence that it was a class society as much as anything in the West, and this affected life chances accordingly, depending where one was situated in the hierarchy. The analysis of the shortcomings and failures of the Soviet system shouldn't offend anyone but the most hardened Stalinist sectarian.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful By William Podmore on 30 Oct. 2012
Format: Paperback
Many writers about Russia write as if there was never any violence in the world before the 1917 Russian Revolution. But Haynes and Hasan show that famines and repression were endemic under tsarism. For example, pogroms in 1905-6 killed 10,000 people.

In the first three years of World War One, 1914-17, Russia suffered an estimated 1.269 million to 2.293 million military deaths and 804,000 to 919,000 civilian deaths: total deaths, 2.073 million to 3.212 million. So by taking Russia out of the war a year early, the revolution saved possibly a million lives.

The British-led war of intervention against Soviet Russia, 1918 to 1921, caused an estimated 2 to 2.55 million military-related deaths and a further 10 million civilian deaths, largely through war-induced famine and disease. Britain's blockade of Russia targeted civilians.

September 1918 saw massacres by White generals, 1,500 peasants by Annenkov's troops, 2,500 by General Pokrovskii.

The authors refute the big lie that the Soviet government used famine as a genocidal weapon against Ukraine. They write, "The 1930 and 1931 harvests had not been good but things were especially bad in 1932. Famine in this sense was not intended policy."

Unfortunately, the book's account of the Stalin years is, as we expect from Pluto Press, just an echo of Foreign Office and State Department lies.

The authors do point out the effects of the Gorbachev-Yeltsin counter-revolution. 1998's output was half 1991's. In 2000, real wages were 46 per cent of 1991's level. Male life expectancy fell from 63.5 in 1991 to 58.6 in 2001. There were 2.5 million excess deaths in the 1990s, an unprecedented number in peacetime. Utsa Patnaik more recently estimated, in The republic of hunger and other essays (Merlin, 2007), that the restoration of capitalism in Russia caused four million excess deaths.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Uneven account 30 Oct. 2012
By William Podmore - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Many writers about Russia write as if there was never any violence in the world before the 1917 Russian Revolution. But Haynes and Hasan show that famines and repression were endemic under tsarism. For example, pogroms in 1905-6 killed 10,000 people.

In the first three years of World War One, 1914-17, Russia suffered an estimated 1.269 million to 2.293 million military deaths and 804,000 to 919,000 civilian deaths: total deaths, 2.073 million to 3.212 million. So by taking Russia out of the war a year early, the revolution saved possibly a million lives.

The British-led war of intervention against Soviet Russia, 1918 to 1921, caused an estimated 2 to 2.55 million military-related deaths and a further 10 million civilian deaths, largely through war-induced famine and disease. Britain's blockade of Russia targeted civilians.

September 1918 saw massacres by White generals, 1,500 peasants by Annenkov's troops, 2,500 by General Pokrovskii.

The authors refute the big lie that the Soviet government used famine as a genocidal weapon against Ukraine. They write, "The 1930 and 1931 harvests had not been good but things were especially bad in 1932. Famine in this sense was not intended policy."

Unfortunately, the book's account of the Stalin years is, as we expect from Pluto Press, just an echo of Foreign Office and State Department lies.

The authors do point out the effects of the Gorbachev-Yeltsin counter-revolution. 1998's output was half 1991's. In 2000, real wages were 46 per cent of 1991's level. Male life expectancy fell from 63.5 in 1991 to 58.6 in 2001. There were 2.5 million excess deaths in the 1990s, an unprecedented number in peacetime. Utsa Patnaik more recently estimated, in The republic of hunger and other essays (Merlin, 2007), that the restoration of capitalism in Russia caused four million excess deaths.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback