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Century City Hardcover – 30 Nov 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 210 pages
  • Publisher: King of the Kippax Publications (30 Nov 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0955705606
  • ISBN-13: 978-0955705601
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 2.3 x 25.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,194,413 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alan Richards on 3 Sep 2009
Format: Hardcover
I was about seven years old when the season in question was unfolding. The tragic events at Munich almost swayed my football affections. Luckily they didn't and I was lured by the sky blue of the old unpredictables.

Never more unpredictable perhaps than in the nine months or so described in great detail within the pages of this book.

It's essential reading for anyone interested in City, or the era in a football or indeed social context.

That interest is fanned and inflamed by many first person accounts of some of the games which saw City living up to their reputation.
Journalistic accounts are a feature too and the write-ups of the day often reveal a language and an emphasis which has slipped away
over the intervening decades.

The Blues were what the blues have almost always been - inconsistent.
Superb victories against title challengers could be followed up a week later by a good thumping from also rans.

Small sketches of foootball grounds - proper grounds with floodlight pylons, nooks and crannies and looking designed by committees - along with front page covers from the 'programmes' of the day complete ones transportation back to na age of comparative innocence, and an austerity to revel in. You knew where you were.

Dave Wallace - as a kid of about twelve was usually on the terraces at Maine Road, and admirably made a few away games too - luckily for us. This comprehensive record of a season may well have slipped away into the mists of time had he not decided to press on with this project to preserve it for the interested. Thanks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. J. Miller on 11 Nov 2008
Format: Hardcover
A review of -
CENTURY CITY
by Dave Wallace

When Manchester City played their penultimate game of last season at Anfield, it was against a backdrop of yet more turbulence behind the scenes. Despite achieving the target set by his employers, manager Sven Goran Eriksson was on the verge of being sacked, the fans were in revolt (again) and the Chairman was facing corruption charges in his home country. Just another typical Manchester City scenario and one that had The Liverpool Echo introducing its match report, "When the nation's favourite footballing basket-case rolls into town....". Basket-case directors, basket-case players (Stephen Ireland's dead grandmothers comes immediately to mind) and, of course, basket-case fans....bananas, the lot of them.

The above leads one to question author Dave Wallace's state of mind when he decided to finally get round to writing this, his first book. Not for him, the glories of the late sixties/early seventies under the Mercer-Allison regime, nor a look back at City's last trophy, way back in 1976. He could have retreated to the pre-war era when at least the club was a bigger outfit than their now gargantuan neighbours United, but no, Mr Wallace decides to pick a season when City didn't actually win anything and conceded 100 goals in the process. It is also the season when their neighbours suffered the tragedy of the Munich Air Disaster and as a consequence almost anything City achieved would have understandably been overshadowed by the sadness and enormity of that event. However, what City did achieve that season was to come 5th in the old First Division and, perhaps more amazingly, end with what is now termed a `positive goal difference', by scoring 104 goals.
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