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Cauldron Hardcover – 6 Nov 2007

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 373 pages
  • Publisher: Ace Books (6 Nov. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0441015255
  • ISBN-13: 978-0441015252
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 3.2 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,631,388 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
THE CALL CAME, as such things always seemed to, in the middle of the night. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Gumustekin on 17 Jan. 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Typical in the sense that it takes 50-70% of the book for the story to develop while one slowly paces through the pages waiting for the excitement to build and then during the last chapters everything literally explodes so that one can hardly let go of the book hastily reading through chapters within hours.

I like McDevitt because he somehow creates a feasible future for the human race and its struggle among the stars; he does not start his stories in a fictional world/time where there are already various stellar races, interstaller ships etc but rather all his stories develop from where the technology is now and/or might be in a few decades. I like how he builds stories on extraterrestial intelligence (Ancient Shores) or invents science fiction thrillers evolving among the man's chase of other intelligent life.

In the Cauldron, very like in his other novels, I had to read through 200 pages of boring politics/power struggle/unsuccessful technological attempts before the real excitement kicked in. But then the pace gets incredible; interstellar travel, discovery of other earth-like planets, first contact with other races (eveh with Chindi makers)..

It is definitely a good / short read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert on 20 Jan. 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I like McDevvitts work, and I thought Cauldron was entertaining. I did not feel it grabbed me like some of his other work in the same series, but there was still a sense of exploration. Sometimes, as I read, I found similarity with previous stories. McDevitt himself agrees that he recycles
ideas and almost whole tales - most notably in A Talent for War. But I think he is just being honest there - and probably lots of authors do this.

Caudron wraps up most of the Patricia Hutchins series in explaining the origin of the Omega Clouds. The book is really in two parts. the first is about a potential improvement on the star drive which will allow a trip towards the galactic centre. The second half is a stops-along-the-way adventure.

It is probably enjoyable for readers of the series. It may not stand alone.
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By Paul Tapner TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Jan. 2010
Format: Mass Market Paperback
another science fiction novel from writer jack mcdevitt in the series of books featuring star pilot priscilla hutchins. set a couple of centuries hence these chronicle mans exploration of the universe, and are set against a would be realistic background of space flight having to fight for funding back on earth from an uncaring humanity.

There's enough information presented early on for those who havent followed the series to easily get into this, but there's still a fair bit of backstory here so this may not work that well in isolation.

It runs for 350 pages and is divided into four parts all containing relatively short chapters.

Picking up the story from previous volumes which saw strange clouds in space called omegas that destroy whatever comes into contact with them, hutch would like to journey to the centre of the galaxy, where they come from, to find out why they exist. and she's not the only one. but all interested parties need a starship and an engine system for it that can get them there quickly.

The first half of the book centres on the struggles to achieve this. It starts out readable and pacy but after about seventy pages you may be getting impatient for them to get there. however the pace of the next eighty or so pages does pick up somewhat.

once the expedition is a go their findings are quite interesting and imaginative without ever stepping too far outside the bounds of possibility. this strives to be realistic science fiction and it remains pretty much so even when the answer to the big question is revealed.

It considers it's arguments about the validity of exploration well enough and makes some good subtle points about stagnation of society via some aliens encountered.
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