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Catastrophe: Europe Goes to War 1914 Paperback – 8 May 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: William Collins (8 May 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007519745
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007519743
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 4.4 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (370 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,871 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Sir Max Hastings is the author of twenty-five books, many of them about war. He was educated at Charterhouse and University College, Oxford, which he quit after a year to become a journalist. Thereafter he reported for newspapers and BBC TV from sixty-four countries and eleven conflicts, notably the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Vietnam and the 1982 Battle for the Falklands. Between 1986 and 2002 he was editor-in-chief of The Daily Telegraph, then editor of the Evening Standard. He has won many prizes both for journalism and for his books, most recently the 2012 Chicago Pritzker Library's $100,000 literary award for his contribution to military history, and the RUSI's Westminster Medal for his international best-seller 'All Hell Let Loose'.

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Review

BOOK OF THE YEAR – AS CHOSEN BY THE INDEPENDENT, FINANCIAL TIMES, OBSERVER, TIMES LITERARY SUPPLEMENT AND SPECTATOR.

‘Like one of Field Marshal Haig’s family whiskies, Max Hastings is a dram that steadily improves with age … His position as Britain’s leading military historian is now unassailable … In this enormously impressive new book, Hastings effortlessly masters the complex lead-up to and opening weeks of the First World War … [He] is as magisterial as we would expect … This is a magnificent and deeply moving book, and with Max Hastings as our guide we are in the hands of a master’ Nigel Jones, Telegraph

‘Hastings is the author of consistently good histories of WWII. But with ‘Catastrophe’ he has reached a new level of excellence’ The Times

‘Magnificent … Hastings writes with an enviable grasp of pace and balance, as well as an acute eye for human detail. Even for readers who care nothing for the difference between a battalion and a division, his book is at once moving, provocative and utterly engrossing’ Sunday Times

‘Masterly … Hastings is a brilliant guide to that strange, febrile twilight before Europe plunged into darkness. Writing in pungent prose suffused with irony and underpinned by a strong sense of moral outrage … this is history-writing at its best, scholarly and fluent … for anyone wanting to understand how that ghastly, much-misunderstood conflict came about, there could be no better place to start than this fine book’ The Times

‘One could scarcely ask for a better guide to these horrors than Max Hastings … he is a superb writer with a rare gift for evoking the rhythm, mood and raw physical terror of battle … If you are looking for a humane and compelling interpretive chronicle of the formative months of this horrific conflict, you will find none better’ Mail on Sunday

‘Very readable. Character, pace, sense of landscape, battlefield detail – all are superbly done … it's a splendid read’ Observer

About the Author

Sir Max Hastings is the author of twenty-five books, many of them about war. He was educated at Charterhouse and University College, Oxford, which he quit after a year to become a journalist. Thereafter he reported for newspapers and BBC TV from sixty-four countries and eleven conflicts, notably the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, Vietnam and the 1982 Battle for the Falklands. Between 1986 and 2002 he was editor-in-chief of The Daily Telegraph, then editor of the Evening Standard. He has won many prizes both for journalism and for his books, most recently the 2012 Chicago Pritzker Library’s $100,000 literary award for his contribution to military history, and the RUSI’s Westminster Medal for his international best-seller All Hell Let Loose. He has two grown-up children, Charlotte and Harry, and lives with his wife Penny in West Berkshire, where they garden enthusiastically.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brian Hamilton TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Jun. 2014
Format: Paperback
This books achieves the awe inspiring combination of fact and entertainment. His blend of hard military information infused with vignettes of the average foot soldier, peasants, disaffected and the everyman is very heady and brings strong emotion to a table normally only adorned with the dry biscuit of troop movements and engagements.

Finally, we can read about the confused beginnings and the slow awakening that a world altering struggle was unfolding.

The reviews that have gone before are correct in their plaudits and the praise heaped upon Hastings are justly given, he is a man of strong intellect, cutting insight and is able to grasp disparate elements and describe in a way that is straightforward without being patronizing or 'dumbing down' the content.

I can see myself reading his other works for the sheer majesty of his writing and the towering aspirations that he loftily commands.

As it says on the blurb, 'we are at the hands of a master.'

Never have I read a book that has tackled a potentially arid subject with such emotion and humanity.

This should be an essential read for anyone with even the slightest bone of interest in their body about where we are today and what has shaped our modern world.

Essential reading.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Steve on 16 Jan. 2014
Format: Hardcover
World War 1 is in some ways more fascinating than WW2, and there are plenty of us who have read a lot on the subject. For that reason I didn't really fancy this. I thought it might be a rehash of stuff I already knew.

However, I must say that Max Hastings has done a quite brilliant job. The book is extremely readable, with so many details of personal experience, that I don't think I have read anything that comes close. hastings has not only assembled first hand accounts from the British, French and German angles, but also Russian, Serbian and all the rest. There is so much in there that I had no idea about.

Hastings makes an impassioned case that the War in 1914 was not a pointless "lambs to slaughter" situation. Soldiers went into with their eyes open, knowing what they were fighting for. Furthermore, he makes a good case that although Britain and France were certainly worse off after the War, they had saved the continent from German domination, which was the only alternative.

A point which Hastings does not make explicitly, but certainly comes through from the text, is that the big loser was Russia. In 1914, Russia was growing economically at 10% a year and modernising rapidly. By 1916, the Germans would not have dared take them on. Yet Russia was wrecked by the war, and further, spent 70 whole years with its people's lives wrecked by Communism.

I would recommed this book to anyone interested in history.
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186 of 201 people found the following review helpful By Leonard Fleisig TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 13 Sept. 2013
Format: Hardcover
Whiles lions war and battle for their dens,
Poor harmless lambs abide their enmity." Wm. Shakespeare. King Henry VI, Part 3.

Max Hasting's "Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War" is a masterfully crafted account of Europe's descent into the apocalypse known as the Great War. It is a study that focuses on Europe's sabre-rattling lions who led millions headlong into the valley of the shadow of death. It also provides a compelling parallel narrative of the lambs, civilian and soldier alike, who in abiding their enmity provided fodder for the carnage that inexorably followed.

Hasting has two stories to tell and he tells them well. The first third or so of the book covers the events leading up to the commencement of the war. The book starts, as many histories of WWI do, with a Prologue on the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914. However, Hasting makes a compelling case for the notion that the events in Sarajevo were but the last link in a chain of events that led to the war. Hastings looks at Sarajevo as a pretext for a war that many European leaders, most notably those in Germany and the Austro-Hungarian empire, were hungry for; while other leaders (France, Russian and to a lesser extent Britain) felt a war was inevitable and did little to stop the march to war.

The remainder of the book is devoted to an account of the first five months of the war, from August through December, 1914. Those marked were marked by the great opening offensives, the Germans march through Belgium toward Paris, the Russian offensive in the East and the Austrian offensives in Poland and Serbia. The outcome of these battles, particularly in the west, drew the battle-lines over which the next three years of trench warfare were fought.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mr Lee Rudd on 4 Jun. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As usual from this author, an in depth analysis of the circumstances leading to the First World War, as told by those leading the various nations, and the ordinary soldier, sailer and civilian. The stories are interwoven into a single narrative, leaping from area to area, country to country.

I'm struck by the ineptitude of many of the very senior generals, in not being able to cope with modern warfare on an industrial scale. The soldier at the front seemed able to adapt, although their officers less so, and also less tolerant of war intervening into their comfortable lives.

From a British perspective, I'm also struck by the small contribution of the country to the war in 1914, in comparison to the millions of Frenchman, Russians and Germans to the conflict. Even so, the parochialism and nationalism of many of the counties involved, many resenting their allies more than their enemies!

Max Hastings makes the case that the war was largely the fault of the Germans being unwilling and unable to resist the descent into conflict. Once committed to war, all countries - sadly - were in until the end of the conflict.

Thought provoking, a very worthwhile read to stem the tide of over patriotic remembrance this year.
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