Quantity:1
Elgar & Carter: Cello... has been added to your Basket
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Like New | Details
Sold by Shay Given
Condition: Used: Like New
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £7.99

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Elgar & Carter: Cello Concertos
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Elgar & Carter: Cello Concertos


Price: £13.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
Does not apply to gift orders. See Terms and Conditions for important information about costs that may apply for the MP3 version in case of returns and cancellations.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Complete your purchase to add the MP3 version to your Amazon music library. Provided by Amazon EU S.à r.l.
45 new from £4.87 5 used from £4.86
£13.25 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Amazon Artist Stores

All the music, full streaming songs, photos, videos, biographies, discussions, and more.
.

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Buy a CD from our World, Folk, Classical or Jazz stores to purchase Songlines Music Awards 2015 CD for £3.99. Here's how (terms and conditions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Elgar & Carter: Cello Concertos + Dvorak: Cello Concerto
Price For Both: £26.14

Buy the selected items together

Product details

  • Audio CD (4 Feb. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Decca Classics
  • ASIN: B009B82D48
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 28,915 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, Op.85 - 1. Adagio - ModeratoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 7:47£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, Op.85 - 2. Lento - Allegro moltoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 4:26£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, Op.85 - 3. AdagioAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 5:07£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Elgar: Cello Concerto in E minor, Op.85 - 4. AllegroAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin11:55£1.49  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Carter: Cello Concerto - 1. DrammaticoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 1:40£0.39  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Carter: Cello Concerto - 2. Allegro AppassionatoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 2:43£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Carter: Cello Concerto - 3. GiocosoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 3:11£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. Carter: Cello Concerto - 4. LentoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 3:39£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Carter: Cello Concerto - 5. MaestosoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 3:04£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Carter: Cello Concerto - 6. TranquilloAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 4:11£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Carter: Cello Concerto - 7. Allegro FantasticoAlisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin 3:48£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Bruch: Kol Nidrei - Adagio For Cello, Opus 47Alisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim and Staatskapelle Berlin10:49£1.49  Buy MP3 

Product Description

DEC 4782735; DECCA - Inghilterra; Classica Orchestrale per cello

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ben Basing on 29 May 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I heard about this recording and how marvellous it is, but it remained unpurchased in my wishlist for ages because I was cynical about the hype surrounding any new artist, especially a first performance so soon after the composers death. The Carter is, for Carter, accessible and musical, obviously more modern than the Elgar but not outrageous or experimental in any way. The two pieces were not paired for purely marketing reasons, there is a similarity of idiom- probably enhanced by Weilerstein's approach- which this disc emphasises. Most importantly, the Elgar does not sound like a weak alternative to the Du Pre recording; if you have du Pre but have avoided buying two recordings of the same composition this would be a very good start to the collectors habit of 'compare and contrast'- maybe expensive, but certainly worthwhile! You will probably end up collecting Carter too, an amazing man.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Reg on 18 Feb. 2013
Format: MP3 Download Verified Purchase
As we all know, taste in music is very personal - one person's loves are often another's hates. I bought this for the Elgar, which I have always loved since hearing La Du Pre's celebrated version (and I have on vinyl). But I cannot afford the space to have my record deck out, so when I heard about Wellerstein, I thought I would get it for my iPod library. I don't regret the decision.
I'm struggling with the Carter concerto, but maybe I will get to like it in time.
'Kol Nidrei' is simply beautiful!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By rob w on 7 Sept. 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I find this recording rather confusing because of the contrast between the two main works that show the shift in classical music in the 20th century. The Elgar is a beautifully melodic work with stormy passages reflecting the time at which it was written [1919], the Carter work was written in 2001 and is a very different work with jagged rhythms and the orchestra occasionally bursting through. The work is of course wonderfully performed by Alisa Weilerstein and Daniel Barenboim [with the Staatskapelle Berlin]. my problem with the album lies with the choice of material although it may be an interesting choice for the performers and aficionados, but for the general listener who likes Elgar they might find the Carter piece too much of a change, the extra piece by Max Bruch is a better fit. So for the general listener I feel this is a bit too much of a contrast, but I must say that I found the contrast of two pieces almost a century apart an interesting experience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By afficianado on 23 Feb. 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I listened to this new and well-publicised recording of Elgar's classic concerto with much interest and anticipation.
However, with several other fine recordings of the work in my library, this is not a performance I personally would generally reccomend -particularly to anyone coming to the work for the first time.
Since Jacqueline du Pres' famous landmark -and now historic- recording of 1965, it has arguably been rather difficult for any subsequent cellist to stamp their own individual interpretation on the work without straying far from Elgar's own directions regarding tempi/dynamics etc in the score.
The concerto was Elgar's last substantial composition; and although its character appears full of a wistful reminiscence -almost a memorial perhaps- to the era which formed the substantial part of his long life, before the reckless waste of World War I, Elgar was very much a 'man of his time.' Edwardians -especially men- were not given to overt emotion or wearing of 'hearts on sleeves' -as his own recordings show.
Although the justly famous du Pres/Barbirolli EMI performance is a bold,dramatic and often poignant reading, I do not find it ever succumbs to melodrama (unlike perhaps the later du Pres/Barenboim recording.) There is surely a world of diffference between a performer bringing their own personality to an interpretation and merely using a composition as a vehicle of personal expression.
However -though not in any way criticising Alisa Weilerstein's generous tone and impeccable technique, I personally find that indulgent tamperings with Elgar's markings are often too extreme -to the point that some important phrases lose all sense of any 'line' or direction, such is the length to which they are drawn out.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By ab on 17 May 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I heard Alisa Weilerstein play the Dvorak in Symphony Hall B'ham, 2012?
Enjoyed it very much, she is a gifted and spontaneous player.
I had high hopes therefore for this recording, and am sorry to be disappointed by it.
I find it over emotive to the point of twitchy, nerve-shredding, neurotic panic.
It is brilliantly played, no question ... but ...even alongside Du Pre, the high water mark in emotional engagement with this piece hitherto, Weilerstein, time and time again, puts MORE stress, MORE rubatto, MORE extremes of dynamic.
I'm not sure the piece survives this kind of extreme treatment.
The other problem is that the orchestra and soloist sound to have been recorded in different rooms. Cello is very close, orchestra is muffled and inner parts lack any clarity.
I seem the minority here - but I am not convinced by this as an interpretation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Audio CD
4 1/2 stars -- and that's no criticism of Weilerstein or Barenboim, for as Ralph Moore says, "Barenboim and the typically accomplished Staatskapelle Berlin take a back seat to their soloist and the recording favours her unnaturally in ensemble - but one must expect that; the sound is otherwise wonderful." I disagree with RM only to the extent that I don't think we have to expect the degree of spotlighting of the solo instrument that we get here. It's a credit to Weilerstein and her technique that even as "in your face" as the soloist is, the effect isn't cloying or overpowering. In fact, her timings for the movements are pretty much the same as in my favorite recording, Heinrich Schiff's 1982 version with Marriner and the Dresden Staatskapelle. The Elgar is a great piece, up there with the Dvorak, and Weilerstein has the measure of its somber beauty. In particular, I was impressed by the handling of the final movement, the longest in the piece, which recapitulates and transforms material from the earlier movements. Weilerstein and Barenboim handle the transitions within the movement beautifully, so that both the movement and the whole concerto leave the listener feeling the organic unity of the piece. Weilerstein's playing of the cantabile parts -- the Adagio, of course -- is warm and wonderful, eloquent without ever descending to sentimentality. She always keeps the music moving forward, and Barenboim is as rhythmically alert as he is tonally attentive, and the Berlin Staatskapelle plays beautifully. The Bruch "Kol Nidrei," which is offered as a "bonus" here (!??*!), is similarly eloquently played.

The odd coupling, which some reviewers don't like, is the Elliott Carter Cello Concerto from 2001.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for similar items by category


Feedback