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Carrie Audio CD – Audiobook, 7 Feb 2005


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Unabridged edition (7 Feb. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743536983
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743536981
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.2 x 14.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (194 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,370,709 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Stephen King is the author of more than fifty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. Among his most recent are the Dark Tower novels, Cell, From a Buick 8, Everything's Eventual, Hearts in Atlantis, The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon, and Bag of Bones. His acclaimed nonfiction book, On Writing, was also a bestseller. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Why read Carrie? Stephen King himself has said that he finds his early work "raw," and Brian De Palma's movie was so successful that we feel like we have read the novel even if we never have. The simple answer is that this is a very scary story, one that works as well--if not better--on the page as on the screen. Carrie White, menaced by bullies at school and her religious nut of a mother at home, gradually discovers that she has telekinetic powers, powers that will eventually be turned on her tormentors. King has a way of getting under the skin of his readers by creating an utterly believable world that throbs with menace before finally exploding. He builds the tension in this early work by piecing together extracts from newspaper reports, journals, and scientific papers, as well as more traditional first- and third-person narrative in order to reveal what lurks beneath the surface of Chamberlain, Maine.
News item from the Westover (ME) weekly Enterprise, August 19, 1966: "Rain of Stones Reported: It was reliably reported by several persons that a rain of stones fell from a clear blue sky on Carlin Street in the town of Chamberlain on August 17th."
Although the supernatural pyrotechnics are handled with King's customary aplomb, it is the carefully drawn portrait of the little horrors of small towns, high schools, and adolescent sexuality that give this novel its power, and assures its place in the King canon. --Simon Leake --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Gory and horrifying ...you can't put it down." -- "Chicago Tribune" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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It was reliably reported by several persons that a rain of stones fell from a clear blue sky on Carlin Street in the town of Chamberlain on August 17th. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By 'Chewy' on 16 Mar. 2007
Format: Paperback
Well considering that King thought this book wasnt worth publishing it has done surprisingly well, wouldnt you agree?

King has a knack of relating fiction to real-life and this is no exception. Teen bullying, a girls first entry into womanhood, it is all real and for most of us, scary. King in turn makes his stories scary to reflect this by using real problems.

Carrie is a teenager with 'normal' difficulties at school. She however does have an underlying power, a well hidden dark side that is waiting to burst out. And burst out it does in one hell of a blast, and a hell of a climax.

The characters are easy to relate to and you willl be forgiven if you think they are actually based on real people, such is Kings talent. This book is, for the most part, an 'easy' read. The plot is clear and simple to follow. However just because the plot is simple doesnt mean it is any less engrossing. And get engrossed into Carrie's world you will.

A super read that is quite linear with fewer twists and turns than in Kings larger books, but exciting none the less.

He is truly the epitome of modern horror.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 30 Nov. 2002
Format: Paperback
As with virtually everything Stephen King has written, this is enjoyable reading. It is also a quick-read for anyone who is intimidated by the length of some of the author's later works. I think the basic premise of this story appeals to many people because Carrie is, in many ways, the ultimate underdog, a girl terrorized by an insanely religious mother, victimized and persecuted by her peers, and alienated from the world around her. Everyone in life has been a victim or a bully, and I think the story of Carrie White does impart an important lesson to the folks out there who are treating someone they know the way that Carrie's classmates treated her. For those of us more sympathetic to Carrie's plight--the high school "outcasts," the "poor," the unpopular, the nerds, etc.--the story really matters here. Many of us daydream about the revenge we will exact from those kids who made fun of us all those years ago, and Carrie White shows us that revenge is not all it is cracked up to be. Carrie's "triumph" costs many innocent people their lives, and it doesn't really do a whole lot of good for Carrie herself.
You don't need me to tell you why you should read or re-read this book. This is Stephen King. By this point in time, unless you are just coming of age, you have already read this book if you are one of King's legions of fans or even if you were ever curious about this man's phenomenal success. Even more of you have probably seen the movie. While the movie was pretty faithful to the book, not even the magic of cinema can convey the true weight and atmosphere of this (or any other) book. Carrie is also King's first published novel.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Michael Heron TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 16 Mar. 2015
Format: Paperback
Carrie is Stephen King's first published novel - and it shows. As interesting a story as it is, it's let down by some tremendously amateurish writing both stylistically and in terms of the characters. It lacks his usual wit, sophistication, and beautifully picked language. It's the book of an author that is still struggling to find his voice.

The clunkiness is apparent in a number of areas... instead of hinting or fencing with a revelation, King just comes out and says it. 'What none of them knew was that Carrie was telekinetic' is so far from his usual poetic foreshadowing that it's extremely jarring. The extracts from the fictional academic journals show an almost comical lack of understanding of how such documents are written. If it was lampooning academia, as House of Leaves does so elegantly, it would be fine. Instead it comes across as careless and lazy, and since these extracts are a considerable cornerstone of the book it makes the whole thing come across as careless and lazy.

None of this is to say that it's bad, because it isn't - it's just very far from the confidence and competence that he would so clearly demonstrate a mere year later with Salem's Lot. The story of Carrie has a lot of resonance - after all, who can't identify with the trials and travails of a bullied schoolchild? Who hasn't entertained bloody revenge fantasies where a position of powerlessness transforms into a position of unquenchable power? Who can't feel desperately sorry for Carrie when her outsider status was so constantly and consistently reiterated that her fondest dream was to just be left alone? There is much in the book to draw you in. It's a good story - maybe even a great story. It's just not a great execution.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Simon Edwards on 28 Jun. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
It was like love at first sight when I first picked up this novel at the age of thirteen, loving the front cover of a girl with blood dripping down her face. I was attracted to it immediately and it would be a love affair that has lasted fifteen years.

I had just lost my dad and was completely depressed. Within the first few lines of this debut novel by my all-time favourite write Stephen King, I immediately forgot all my troubles and concerns and was engrossed within the story of the "ugly duckling girl" that was tormented by her peers, tortured emotionally and physically by her religiously demented mother and had a rare gift - the gift of telekinesis - that allowed her to move objects with her mind. I felt sorry for Carrie and suddenly started wishing that I had a gift like this, but the genius of King is the way he is able to twist this wonderful rare talent into the ultimate nightmare.

Carrie is a simple story of how a girl who has no friends, suddenly discovers the idea of women growing up and discovering her first period, a trauma for her brought on by the fact that she believes she is dying, as well as the fact that her peers believe this is just a funny joke that they can use to abuse Carrie with. This is the catalyst that starts the whole horror of what the novel Carrie really is. Through the use of false interviews and made-up articles written by King himself, the reader learns the true horror of what this girl possesses and what she has to go through to get to the point of prom night where she will use her power to enact vengeance on those that have tortured her.
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