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Carpe Jugulum: (Discworld Novel 23) (Discworld Novels) Paperback – 6 Nov 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Corgi; New Ed edition (6 Nov. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0552154202
  • ISBN-13: 978-0552154208
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 2.5 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (105 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 412,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Terry Pratchett is the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which, The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he is the author of fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he is the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. Worldwide sales of his books now stand at 70 million, and they have been translated into thirty-seven languages.

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Carpe Jugulum is the 23rd Discworld novel, and with it this durable series continues its juggernaut procession onwards. Pratchett is an author who inspires such devotions that his fans will fall on the novel with cries of joy. Non-fans, perhaps, will want to know what all the fuss is about; and that's something difficult to put into a few words. The best thing to do for those completely new to Pratchett is to sample him for themselves, and this novel is as good a place to start as any. But fans have a more precise question. They know that Discworld novels come in one of two varieties: the quite good, and the brilliant. So, for instance, where Hogfather and Maskerade were quite good, Feet of Clay and Jingo were brilliant. While true fans wouldn't want to do without the former, they absolutely live for the latter. And with Carpe Jugulum Pratchett has hit jackpot again. This novel is one of the brilliant ones.

The plot is a version of an earlier Discworld novel, Lords and Ladies, with the predatory elves of that novel being replaced here by suave and deadly vampires, and the tiny kingdom of Lancre being defended by its witches. But plot is the least of Pratchett's appeal, and Carpe Jugulum is loaded with marvellous characters (not least the witches themselves, about whom we learn a deal more here), comic touches and scenes of genius, and even some of the renowned down-to-earth Pratchett wisdom (here about the inner ethical conflicts we all face, and the wrongness of treating people as things). Pratchett's vampires are elegant Bela Lugosi types, and they come up against an unlikely but engaging alliance of witches, blue-skinned pixies like Rob Roy Smurfs, a doubting priest with a boil on his face and a magical house-sized Phoenix in a seamless, completely absorbing and feel-good-about-the- universe mixture. Highly recommended. --Adam Roberts --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"He will remain an enduring, endearing presence in comic literature" (Guardian)

"Both his inventiveness and his moral shrewdness seem inexhaustible" (Daily Express)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 11 Feb. 2000
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book and as a pratchett fan I feel that it is definatly one of his best. Vlad the Vampire is a fantastic character, intriguing, dangerous and (this isn't just my opinion, Terry Pratchett himself said in reply to a letter I wrote that it was intentional) very Sexy. I also felt that Agnes was an asset to the book as I was able to relate to her. Although I'm not overly keen on the witches as characters I think this book was brilliant. My only criticism would be that there isn't enough appearances by Death. I feel that I could (in fact will) read it over and over again. I just hope that the next books to appear live up to this standard.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Mar. 1999
Format: Hardcover
It seems that some things never change. Ever since I read mort for the first time about eleven years ago I have been hooked on the discworld, and in the meantime everyone else has gone there too. Anyway, Carpe Jugulum is , to my mind, just as worthwhile as any of the discworld novewls. It may be a basic re-hash of the Lords and Ladies plot but that does not in any way spoil the enjoyment of the reader. It took me three hours to read this book and I barely noticed the time pass. I was captivated to find out what was happening to Granny Weatherwax, and why she was not sprouting fangs and good manners, and it was also most amusing to see how the poor Mr Oats tackled his crisis of faith in Lancre, especially as we all know the truth about Omnism .. or should do if you have read Small Gods..... Anyway, another disc classic, enjoy!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 1 Jan. 1999
Format: Hardcover
I have read most of Pratchett's books and as usual this is no exception to the rest. Funny, witty,imaginative and utterly enthralling are just few of the words I would use to describe the book. In particular the witches are at their best all three of them(four if you count perditta), in particular Nanny Ogg who we see more of than anyone would care to see. Greebo the cat takes a back seat in this story which is a bit of a disappointment. The vampires are charming yet ruthless and Granny Weatherwax is at her best when she is cornered. There are some brillant lines in this book including the one where the villager, when asked about the problem of werewolves says "they leave us alone as humans don't run fast enough to be interesting". All in all a brillant read and well worth the price.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 23 Sept. 2010
Format: Paperback
Terry Pratchett's first novel, "The Carpet People", appeared in 1971. "Carpe Jugulum" is the twenty-third book in his hugely popular Discworld series and was first published in 1998. It's set (mostly) in Lancre and features Granny Weatherwax's famous coven of witches.

The Lancre coven is now made up of Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Agnes Nitt. Agnes has taken over Magrat's old cottage and is a little rotund. Like they say, though, inside every fat girl, there's a thin girl trying to get out. In Agnes's case, the thin girl is called Perdita...an imaginary friend from her childhood who refused to grow up and move out. Perdita has her own voice and personality and - while she and Agnes don't get on very will - Perdita does have a big part to play in the story).

Magrat, Agnes' predecessor, retired from witching when she married Verence, Lancre's King. The Royal Couple are now a Royal Family, and - when the book opens - the baptism of the newly-arrived Royal Daughter is approaching. However, Verence is looking to raise Lancre's profile and has invited a number of foreign dignitaries to join the royal celebrations. Foolishly, he's included the Count de Magpyr, a vampire from Uberwald, on the guest list...the Count brings his wife and two children - Vlad and Lacrimosa. They arrive fashionably late in their own stylishly black coach, driven - naturally - by an Igor. They're a progressive bunch - they occasionally drink wine instead of blood and they're trying to build up an immunity to garlic, sunlight and religious symbols. However, they have chosen to hang on to the mind-control. (Igor doesn't approve of these new-fangled ways at all and, around the stately castle, he's very much in favour of traditional squeaky doors, billowing curtains, spiders and dribbling candles.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ian Tapley VINE VOICE on 13 Nov. 2003
Format: Paperback
THE STORY:
A family of forward-thinking vampires, immune to all the traditional vampire killing methods (except cutting their heads off, which does in most people), has decided to take control of Lancre. The only thing standing in their way is a doubting (doubtful?) priest and the country's resident witches. But the strongest of them, Granny Weatherwax, cannot decide whether she should get involved at all.
WHAT'S GOOD:
Now, I can't claim to be a Pratchett fan, but as the saying goes 'I knows what I likes...'. This book is both funny and clever on many levels, be it in regards to the vampires, whose immunity stems from overcoming the social conditioning that makes them believe they'll burst into flame when the sun rises, or the contradictions of the Omnian faith, which is very thinly veiled satire of the christian church. But this book isn't simply a satire of religion and fokelore, it has a very strong core story that is, in fact, just about Granny Weatherwax's internal conflict about her own darkness and her relationships with others. Death makes a few, very welcome, cameo appearances along the way to lighten the mood too (I just realised how bizarre that sentence sounds!). Ultimately though, my favourite element was none other than those boozing, brawling Wee Free Men, the Nac mac Feegle. You've got to love a tiny blue smurf-like race whose three main pursuits are drinking, fighting "An' snafflin' coobeastie!".
WHAT'S BAD:
Igor's lisping speech and it's onamatapeic (forgive me if I've mispelled that last one - I just wrote it how it sounds!) spelling left me thinking and reading all 's' words with a lisp sound, which really pithed me off! Also, at times I found Agnes' character to be annoying and a bit pointless. Other than those small factors, not much else.
Satirical fantasy with a core of character self-discovery. Brilliant.
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