Buy Used
£4.42
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Careless Love: The Unmaking of Elvis Presley Paperback – 10 Feb 2000


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 10 Feb 2000
£4.42
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


Product details

  • Paperback: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Back Bay Books (10 Feb. 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780316332972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316332972
  • ASIN: 0316332976
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 3.2 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,623,424 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Until Peter Guralnick came out with Last Train to Memphis in 1994, most biographies of Elvis Presley--especially those written by people with varying degrees of access to his "inner circle"--were filled with starstruck adulation, and those that weren't in awe of their subject invariably went out of their way to take potshots at the rock & roll pioneer (with Albert Goldman's 1981 Elvis reaching now-legendary levels of bile and condescension). Guralnick's exploration of Elvis's childhood and rise to fame was notable for its factual rigorousness and its intimate appreciation of Presley's musical agenda.

Picking up where the first volume left off, Guralnick sees Elvis through his tour of duty with the U.S. Army in Germany, where he first met--and was captivated by--a 14-year-old girl named Priscilla Beaulieu. We may think we know the story from this point: the return to America, the near-decade of B-movies, eventual marriage to Priscilla, a brief flash of glory with the '68 comeback, and the surrealism of "fat Elvis" decked out in bejewelled white jumpsuits, culminating in a bathroom death scene.

While that summary isn't exactly false, Guralnick's account shows what little perspective we've had on Elvis's life until now; how a gross caricature of the final years has come to stand for the life itself. He treats every aspect of Presley's life--including forays into spiritual mysticism and the growing dependency on prescription drugs--with dignity and critical distance. More importantly, Careless Love continues to show that Guralnick "gets" what Presley was trying to do as an artist: "I see him in the same way that I think he saw himself from the start," the introduction states, "as someone whose ambition it was to encompass every strand of the American musical tradition." From rock to blues to country to gospel, Guralnick discusses how, at his finest moments, Elvis was able to fulfill that dream. - -Ron Hogan --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

beautifully written and refreshingly sincere, sets new high standards (DAILY MAIL)

Homeric in its play of beauty and folly, this is a monumental work (INDEPENDENT on Sunday) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
THEY LEFT IN THE AFTERMATH of a blustery winter storm. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 16 Feb. 1999
Format: Hardcover
Peter Guralnick paints a picture of Elvis unlike any other literature I've read on the entertainer. For the first time when reading of Presley I don't feel as if the subject is 'The King'. Instead, I am turning pages which describe Elvis Presley: citizen; tax payer; friend; husband; father; lover; and most importantly, singer.
Guralnick is able to scrape away the seemingly endless layers of myth surrounding his subject. He doesn't take the easy route by dwelling on events which are now 'folklore', such as the meeting with the Beatles. There is no dramatic telling of how the drug habit began. Rather, information on it is presented as any vice presents itself. Something which is part of the day-to-day life of the person and over time grows to control them. There is no judgement made here by the author, simply an account of events. When presented as a myth Elvis comes across as kitsch, a joke. Yet when presented as a homosapien by Guralnick he is absolutely fascinating. Pages float by regardless of the fact that we know the tragic ending. We are reading of a life like any other, filled with joy, sorrow, betrayal, dissappointment, triumph and death.
It is the passages recalling recording sessions and performances, however, where Guralnick's book truly comes to life. It is obvious the author not only loves, but believes in the music he is describing. Here we discover the true professional at peace with the artist. No 'good' song was complete unless Elvis was happy with the performance he gave. Recording sessions would go into the wee small hours with no guarantee of a successful result.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By john verhoeff on 9 Nov. 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an incredible book. I have been an Elvis fan for most of my life and I have never really understood what went wrong, and have often asked myself exactly why did Elvis go into such a decline. This book enabled me to fully understand what happened.

Having learned the basics of what happened in various books, documentaries and interviews, this helped fill in the missing pieces, it goes into such depth that I could almost feel how Elvis and those surrounding him felt at crucial points in his decline.

In summary the problems that accumulated would have broken a majority of people much earlier.

Almost certainly the major problems that plagued Elvis in the final few years of his life included the damage to his ego due to Mike Stones' relationship with Pricilla, the raquetball ball court fiasco, the bodyguard book, low record sales, bad concert reviews, the Colonels' gambling habit, the weight problem, the drug addiction, the CBS TV Special, financial expenditure greater than income and Gingers' lack of commitment to their relationship, the list goes on.

Perhaps the live concerts although sometimes difficult to execute with his declining health were probably a little light relief from all of the above and they paid some of the bills.

After reading the book I really can't see how Elvis could have dug himself out of this dark hole. I still can't decide whether it was suicide or an accidental overdose, I suppose we shall never know.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By s VINE VOICE on 7 Jan. 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book follows on from Last Train to Memphis and gives an amazing insight into Elvis and how he was used and abused by family and friends.Colonel Tom Parker is shown in a positive light,warts and all.The book is incredibly well written,full of interesting detail and written sympathetically.It details the life of Elvis from his army days and is a book difficult to put down.You will believe,after reading this book,there is nothing you don't know and won't have the need to read anything more about Elvis,such is the detailed info contained in this great read.Highly recommended to all serious fans but possibly a little to heavy for others with only a little interest in the King.Fantastic value for money.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Feb. 2002
Format: Paperback
Mr Guralnick second part of Elvis' biography rehabilitates much of Elvis fat and decadent image without denying it.The book is well written, well researched and never loses its objective grip. It clearly describes the slow, but defintite slide downwards of a desperate Elvis. Elvis, it seems, feels trapped, lonely and often bored. It is really revealing how Elvis is ruined artistically in the 60's by the Colonol and his own entourage. No one seems to believe or understand the true greatness of Elvis as a singer - he remains the lucky Kid to most of them.
Apart from a brief (and often ignored) artistic renaissance in 1968 - 1973, Elvis never rises to his olde highs - though he himself seems despearte to do so. Often he hates his own movies and crappy songs - but remains loyal to the Colonel's deals. "The Colonel always has done him well" being the reason.
In the end Elvis is heading for selfdestruction, often wrestling with his own selfesteem, but caring less and less. What remains to end though is his love of singing. Sad, but classical reading into the pressures of stardom even if you're not an Elvis fan. It is all about the rise and fall of a superstar with Elvis being a great template for many examples.
If you think Elvis was crap ever since the 60's & never bothered to be interested - this book explains why and why not you'd be right without getting gossippy or taking sides. I'll bet you go out and try some of his 70's records, probably a live one.
A great book to read on a great subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback