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Cardillac


Price: £11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
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£11.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Product details

  • Audio CD (7 Oct. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Opera D'Oro
  • ASIN: B00079W8TU
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 506,604 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. I. Prelude: 'Morder! Morder!' - Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus - Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus
2. II. 'Uber Euch Allen' - Willi Nett Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus - Willi Nett Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus
3. III. 'Wer Ging Vorbei' - Elisabeth Soderstrom Eberhard Katz - Elisabeth Soderstrom Eberhard Katz
4. IV. 'Waagschalen Dieser Velt!' - Eberhard Katz - Eberhard Katz
5. V. 'Die Zeit Vergeht, Rose Zerfiel' - Elisabeth Soderstrom - Elisabeth Soderstrom
6. VI. Pantomime - Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra - Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra
7. I. 'Mag Sonne Leuchten!' - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Karl Christian Kohn - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Karl Christian Kohn
8. II. 'Mein Geliebter Kommt' - Leonore Kirschstein - Leonore Kirschstein
9. III. 'Der Wagen Wartet' - Donald Grobe Leonore Kirchstein - Donald Grobe Leonore Kirchstein
10. IV. 'Dies Ist Das Rechte!' - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Leonore Kirschstein - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Leonore Kirschstein
Disc: 2
1. V. 'Was Ich Erschuf Ist Wurdig Eines Konigs' - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
2. VI. 'Ich Begehre Das Schonste, Was Ihr Schuft' - Donald Grobe Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau - Donald Grobe Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
3. VII. 'Mag Mondlich Leuchten!' - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
4. I. 'Stimme Des AltenDrang Mir Ins Blut' - Donald Grobe Dietrich Fishcer-Dieskau Karl Christian - Donald Grobe Dietrich Fishcer-Dieskau Karl Christian Kohn
5. II. 'Trinker, Kommt Zum Rausch Der Blute!' - Karl Christian Kohn Donald Grobe Dietrich Fischer - Karl Christian Kohn Donald Grobe Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Leonore Kirschstein
6. III. 'Meine Lippen Auf Die Wunde' - Leonore Kirschstein Donald Grobe Cologne Radio Symphony Chor - Leonore Kirschstein Donald Grobe Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
7. IV. 'Vermochte Jener Winz'ge' - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus Donald Grobe - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau Cologne Radio Symphony Chorus Donald Grobe
8. V. 'Gegen Mich Hatte Er' - Donald Grobe - Donald Grobe

Product Description

OPP 1427; OPERA D'ORO - Stati Uniti; Classica contemporanea Lied

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Firstly, this recorded studio performance from 1969 following the celebrated 1965 Munich production with Fischer Dieskau at his considerable very best in the title role surrounded by a stellar cast under the incredible baton of maestro Keilberth, is a MUST HAVE for anybody interested in C20 opera.
Secondly - avoid this particular re-issue like the plague. I honestly thought some of the transfer on these discs had come from a vinyl record of less quality than the couple of LP sets I have in my collection! Awful!

Go instead for the much better digital transfer by DG themselves. I have fully reviewed this elsewhere.

Well, if you wish to save a few dollars or pounds or euros you have been warned!

If you do decide to get the better "in house" set you will enjoy....exciting, colourful, tuneful, great singing and ensembles, fine conducting from the conductors' conductor maestro Keilberth, Fischer Dieskau in top form, great stereo balance and vivid sound....what more do you want? If you want more description please see my other review.

But please avoid this issue...it's poor value even if much cheaper than the DG box set. I have fully reviewed that elsewhere.

The Wergo box set is in a lesser class all round than this and is likewise to be avoided. There are two DVDs, the most redent which I purchased, being a fan of the Opera de Paris in its splendid Bastille home, is eye candy due to the lavish sets and a creative production which places the action in 1920s art nouveau Paris. Authentically in the time and place it was written and set. But the singing is woefully less than here on the Keilberth recording.

But who could get a cast of that calibre now?

So for all of the original fire and excitement get the DG set of this.
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Format: Audio CD
SOURCE:
Radio broadcast from 1968.

SOUND:
Decent 1960s broadcast mono. There is nothing here to make a serious audiophile rejoice, but the set is perfectly listenable nonetheless. The voices seem to me to be a bit too far forward, while the orchestra and sometimes especially the chorus are correspondingly recessed--but that is a matter of purely personal taste. (On track 4, disk 2, however, from about 1:03 to 1:58, there is a stretch of orchestral music with a distinctly different and very boxy soundscape. I have no idea whether this is a fault in my own disk or some sort of patch in the original.)

CAST:
Cardillac, goldsmith and murderer - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)
Cardillac's Daughter - Leonore Kirschstein (soprano)
A Gold Merchant who gets set up for a big fall - Karl Christian Kohn (baritone)
An Officer who seeks the hand of Cardillac's daughter, perhaps too zealously - Donald Grobe (tenor)
A Courtier who is fatally attracted to a certain Lady - Eberhard Katz (tenor)
A Lady with very material tastes - Elisabeth Soderstrom (soprano)
A Provost-Marshal, a public servant who attempts to calm the terrified and hence bloodthirsty Parisian mob - Willi Nett (baritone)

CONDUCTOR:
Joseph Keilberth with the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

DOCUMENTATION:
Usual perfunctory Opera d'Oro package: a brief history of the opera, plot summary and commentary by Bill Parker (whose only fault is the woefully limited space allotted to him by the publishers); track list identifying the major cast character singing but without timings.

TEXT:
"Cardillac," which premiered at the Dresden Opera on November 9, 1926, was Paul Hindemith's (1895-1963) first opera.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
As good as we're likely to get in the foreseeable future 14 Jun. 2012
By L. E. Cantrell - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
SOURCE:
Radio broadcast from 1968.

SOUND:
Decent 1960s broadcast mono. There is nothing here to make a serious audiophile rejoice, but the set is perfectly listenable nonetheless. The voices seem to me to be a bit too far forward, while the orchestra and sometimes especially the chorus are correspondingly recessed--but that is a matter of purely personal taste. (On track 4, disk 2, however, from about 1:03 to 1:58, there is a stretch of orchestral music with a distinctly different and very boxy soundscape. I have no idea whether this is a fault in my own disk or some sort of patch in the original.)

CAST:
Cardillac, goldsmith and murderer - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau (baritone)
Cardillac's Daughter - Leonore Kirschstein (soprano)
A Gold Merchant who gets set up for a big fall - Karl Christian Kohn (baritone)
An Officer who seeks the hand of Cardillac's daughter, perhaps too zealously - Donald Grobe (tenor)
A Courtier who is fatally attracted to a certain Lady - Eberhard Katz (tenor)
A Lady with very material tastes - Elisabeth Soderstrom (soprano)
A Provost-Marshal, a public servant who attempts to calm the terrified and hence bloodthirsty Parisian mob - Willi Nett (baritone)

CONDUCTOR:
Joseph Keilberth with the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra and Chorus

DOCUMENTATION:
Usual perfunctory Opera d'Oro package: a brief history of the opera, plot summary and commentary by Bill Parker (whose only fault is the woefully limited space allotted to him by the publishers); track list identifying the major cast character singing but without timings.

TEXT:
"Cardillac," which premiered at the Dresden Opera on November 9, 1926, was Paul Hindemith's (1895-1963) first opera. The piece achieved considerable success and served to make the composer's name well-known in Europe. At the time, Hindemith was still using traditional musical forms but with twentieth century harmonies (or lack thereof). It seems that he was dissatisfied with the opera, feeling that he may have created, in the words of Od'O annotator Parker, "something of a disconnect between story and music." In any case, on June 20, 1952 he premiered a version of the opera with a revised libretto and a more traditional musical approach. From 1952 to 1961, the composer authorized only the revised version for performance.

Joseph Keilberth (1908-1968) was a strong advocate of Hindemith's music. In this, one of his last major performances before his unexpected death on July 20, 1968 while conducting Wagner's "Tristan und Isolde," he returned to his greatly preferred 1926 version of the opera.

COMMENTARY:
The plot of "Cardillac" deals with a goldsmith working in renaissance Paris who is ... heavily ... fixated on his golden creations. Fixated, indeed, to the extent that each time he reluctantly sells one of his works of art, he is irresistibly impelled to hunt down any unfortunate purchasers and murder them. This, not unexpectedly, proves to be upsetting to the people of Paris. Cardillac has a daughter (to which he seems rather less attached than he is to his art works) and this daughter, in turn, has a suitor, an officer. Of course, the officer buys a gift for the daughter from her father and, of course, the older man goes on the hunt for the younger man. Cardillac finds the officer but manages no more than to wound him before he runs off. The officer, who knows perfectly well the identity of his attacker, chooses not to implicate the father of his beloved, so he lays a false accusation against a poor schnook of a gold merchant. Cardillac, a mad murderer, but apparently a more honorable man than his potential son-in-law, refuses to lie about the gold merchant. This infuriates the mob who threaten to destroy his precious creations. To prevent that, the goldsmith admits his own guilt and is promptly attacked by the mob. The officer intervenes before the goldsmith is quite dead, praising the older man for his dedication to his art. Pleased at this attempted public vindication, the killer-goldsmith dies with a smile on his face.

Now, as anyone can tell, this sort of plot could have come from only two sources: Roger Corman in the days of his C-movie glory at about the time of the original "Little Shop of Horrors" or from E.T.A. Hoffmann. As it happened, Hoffmann was the guilty party. His original story was called "Das Fraulein von Scuderi."

I know no more about this opera than what I have been able to make out after a handful of hearings. I have certainly never encountered a printed score for any of its music. Accordingly, it's somewhat difficult to asses the true quality of the work. My initial and still tentative impression is that "Cardillac" is one of the better self-consciously "modernist" operas of the twentieth century --and heaven knows that is not high praise. It has the not-inconsiderable virtue of being a compact, straight-forward setting of a libretto that actually has a plot, however lurid, and even a point, however lunatic. It, alas, shares two failings of its twentieth century modernist peers. First, the composer resolutely disdains any attempt to create the sort of memorable--even hummable--tunes or orchestral passages that serve so effectively to sell tickets for subsequent performances. The second failing is endemic to the tribe and much worse: neither the libretto nor the score allow for even a single moment of repose or reflection. The effect is very like a room in which everyone is out of sorts and constantly shouting at one another. In "Cardillac," for example, this makes the two tenors into a pair of the least romantic wooers ever to appear on any stage. And goldsmith Cardillac seems always to be foaming at the mouth, so that one can only wonder why the Parisian mobs had not done away with him years before. Still, there are worse examples of these faults to be found in other twentieth century works, so I give Hindemith's first operatic work a fairly high grade.

As to the singers, I give the two women the highest marks. Elisabeth Soderstrom, unexpectedly in a small comprimaria role, builds an unpleasantly convincing character out of virtually nothing. Leonore Kirschstein (b. 1933) was something of a favorite of Keilberth. She appears on his recorded broadcasts of "Hans Heiling" and "Cardillac," as well as his studio recordings of "Der Freischutz" and excerpts from "Mathis der Maler." Here, she seems rather hard-edged, but I am inclined to attribute that more to the composer than to the singer.

Among the men, the most famous by far was the late Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau. Not a speck of his justly famous charm and elegance comes across in this performance. It's all rave, snarl and shout from beginning to end. However Hindemith laid the notes down on paper, I'm astonished that such a renowned and subtle song interpreter couldn't find even a moment to inject a hint of warmth or sympathy for Cardillac, that hell-driven madman. The other baritones, Nett and Kohn (another Keilberth regular) are perfectly adequate and perfectly forgettable. Eberhard Katz has the thankless task of portraying a noble horndog in pursuit of a grasping woman. He doesn't bother to make him likable. Donald Grobe was a famous lyric tenor who is here at his very least lyric. He is by far the winner of the most annoying shouter sweepstakes for this opera.

Keilberth keeps things moving briskly and so far as I can tell the orchestra and chorus are fully up to snuff.

I have done quite a lot of nitpicking here, but I cannot escape the fact that I was impelled to listen closely to this unfamiliar opera over and over in rapid succession. Nitpicking to the contrary, there is something of worth in this opera by Hindemith. I wish it were better--or perhaps more approachable. But it is what it is ... and that's pretty good, all things considered. I could hope for a better performance, or at least a differently focused performance, but this one, I suspect, is as good as we're going to get for years to come.

That being the case, I give it the benefit of a doubt along with four stars.
A terrible transfer of what was a very good stereo studio recording - go for the pricey but 10x better DG edition! 25 Mar. 2014
By david - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This review is from: Cardillac (Audio CD)

I have nothing positive to say about this cheap rip off presentation of what I consider to be an essential part of any Twentieth Century modern opera collection and a great recording. It is far inferior to DG's own reissue with the blue cover and the mask. You will have to pay a lot more for this, but it is worth it!

Exciting, colourful, tuneful, great singing and ensembles, fine conducting from the conductors' conductor maestro Keilberth, Fischer Dieskau in top form, great stereo balance and vivid sound....what more do you want?

But please avoid this issue...it's poor value even if much cheaper than the DG box set. I have fully reviewed that elsewhere.

The Wergo box set is in a lesser class all round than this and is likewise to be avoided.

There are two DVDs, the most recent being a live performance from Paris. which I purchased, being a fan of the Opera de Paris, in its splendid Bastille home, is pure eye candy, due to the lavish sets and a creative production which places the action in 1920s art nouveau Paris. It is a creative and stimulating opera production. But as a recording pales into insignificance compared with the DG studio (courtesy of Bavarian Radio) and the monumental Keilberth achievement. In particular, Alan Held battles bravely on the stage to project the role of the psycho goldsmith, but for a warts and all rendition, with supremely powerful and nuanced singing, you have to go to Fischer Dieskau. In general the singing is woefully less than here on the Keilberth recording. The same is true of the MacIntyre DVD which has none of the benefit of the Paris staging.

But who could get a cast of Keilberth's calibre now?

So for all of the original fire and excitement get the DG set of this.
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