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3.9 out of 5 stars
Capricorn One [Blu-ray]
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 19 May 2013
this may have been a widecreen motion picture but the funding and production was TV-based, hence limitation in quality are obvious at time and a feature of the way it was made. The film was always a curious one. Fantastic acting, curious casting and most oddly expensive filming in one scene followed by ultra low budget scenes in the next. The digital restoration is almost none existent. They have simply used the best master reels available and the result is incredible. HD capture of the original photography is superb in most scenes. The desert scenes are glorious. The studio scence less so but still good. The only real let downs visually are the panned-away studio scences without focus like the locked meeting room at the air-base. Sound is good for this film, not remixed but why would you. This is a classic film and this is giant leap from DVD but do not expect a digitally clean movie, there are original camera artifacts galore but I LOVE the end product.
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51 of 54 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 22 December 2007
Don't be put off by the label on the back of the box which says it is in 4:3 aspect with mono sound.
Actually it is in original 2.35:1 with Dolby Digital 2/0 stereo sound and the video is in MPEG-2.

Picture and sound quality is pretty good for a film of its vintage and budget.

Action sequences of the reporters (Elliott Gould) out of control car and Telly Savalas with his crop spraying plane still look good and are exciting to watch.

Disc has no extras or alternate soundtrack but has subtitles should they be required.

Feature runs for 123 minutes.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 30 August 2011
-> BLU RAY

Back in the seventies 'conspiracy' was all the rage: 3 Days of the Condor; All the President's Men;
The Parallax View; Night Moves; The Domino Principle; The Conversation... to name a few.
(today, of course, you'd do it in broad daylight, assuming you're 'too big to fail'...)
This is a fine (and entertaining!) example of how 70s film dramatized the self-doubt
of a nation and its people's growing mistrust towards their authorities.

Very solid picture. Original aspect ratio.
Recommended! (BD cover data "4:3" = incorrect)

Film: 7,5/10
Picture quality 8/10
Aspect ratio: 2,35:1 orig. (= 16x9 letterbox)
Run time (24 fps): 2:03'09''
Chpt.: 12
Audio: Engl.
ST: Engl. o/-
Region free
Bonus: -
Studio: itv
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 11 May 2013
My copy carries the 'ITV DVD' logo on the top left corner of the front case (even though its blu ray!). The picture is superb but the sound quality on certain scenes is extremely bad, most noticeably during the astronauts being told that they aren't going to Mars. I have a £1000 hi-fi surround system and this is the only disc I've had problems with. It's still a brilliant film though
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 4 November 2014
This is a review for the 2014 release by Network on Blu Ray
I previously owned this film on DVD, which was a decent transfer. I then purchased a Blu Ray version which was poor for both picture and sound, so when I saw that it had been released again but this time in HD I purchased it again only to find the sound is still awful, it is muffled, seemingly out of synch at times and the volume goes up and down. The picture quality is great but the sound spoils it for me
I find it strange that when the film is on TV as it is occasionally this problem does not occur.
I've 3 stars because I do like the film, great premise, great cast.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 14 September 2014
This is maybe hyams' best film. He's always been a good director, and you can tell by this title how working in the Seventies was beneficial to many people in the cinema industry. Hyams would never be so in shape as in capricorn one, helped by a good script and an excellent idea that doesn't just hint at monnlanding conspiracy theory, but also reflect the sense of disbelief toward institutions of that era. It's a very well directed film, both in the action and in the dialogue scenes. i love the way the photography, the acting, the camera, the editing and the sound contribute in giving you the exact atmosphere of a scene and a situation, without overdoing: usually it's a long shot, filled with silence and pauses, slow camera movement, always keeping the character and thr setting in the middle of the scene. Often sottracting detailes instead of piling them up in a exagerated concentration of infos like they started doing in the cinema from the following decades (the eighthies) and even more later on. Now it's unconceivable not to cut every 2 seconds, resulting in a total loss of sense and comcentration of the viewer, who is constantly defocused from what's going on. Still, the action sequences are adrenalinic and very well crafted, so the movie is very well balanced: fast when it must, slow and suspended when it needs to let you live with the characters and their dilemma. Just one flaw: the ending. It's obiously a producer's cut, because it's not comsistent with the rest of the movie, and you can tell it by the awful slow motion: when it's not fluid but jittering like in that sequence, it means that the director didn't shoot it to slow it down in post production (and it makes sense, because that clip doesn't belong to the kind of mood you felt throughtout the story). So, when I saw it, I could hear the producer saying: " well, won't you end the movie so low key, silently and without emphasis?! Stress it up, give it some good effect, make it look amd sound glorious: the audience must understand everything ended up fine". That scene was probably the beginning of the end of an era.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
Capricorn One is a film that seems to have fallen out of favor over the years but it still holds up as one of the best 70s conspiracy thrillers even if it spends more time as a chase movie than it does on the nuts and bolts of exactly how to fake a space mission from a TV studio in Texas. The chronology also gets a little awkward in the second half as Elliot Gould's cynical reporter uncovers NASA's little game and suddenly finds his brakes tampered with and the feds planting drugs on him for his troubles - you can't help feeling that his suspicions should have been aroused a lot earlier to stop him putting the pieces together a little too quickly and conveniently while at the same time the three astronauts who are only co-operating because their families have been threatened (since O.J. is on the crew it must have been a 2-1 majority decision) and suddenly find themselves excess to requirements spend far too much time on the run in the desert. Not that the interest falters, especially as James Brolin has an increasingly tough time of it, finding himself a playground for scorpions and rattlesnakes while chased by the two most malevolent looking helicopters in screen history that become vividly vulture-like characters of their own. It's extraordinarily well directed by Peter Hyams with a remarkably strong visual sense he's long lost since becoming his own cinematographer and some superb crosscutting, and Jerry Goldsmith's superb driving score is among his very best.

The extras package on Network's DVD is better than any previous edition - the full trailer (but not the better teaser trailer on the R1 disc), a 6-minute vintage making-of short and 40-minutes of raw production footage with sound - but not outstanding. However, it does feature an excellent new 2.35:1 transfer that greatly improves on all previous versions.
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63 of 72 people found the following review helpful
on 24 February 2008
As the other buyer indicated, the cover is misleading to say the least:
First, the film runs 123 Min 07 sec @ 23.98p[sf] 1080, so everything is just fine and complete.
Second, the film is presented in the Panavision ratio of 2.35:1; and while the frame may not be 100% perfectly framed, it is almost as good.
Third, the sound is well recorded from the Mag tracks (17.5mm) and well layed back. It could have been improved in balancing the dynamic range, but, the result is to most I guess very much acceptable.

So, why merely 3 out of 5 ? Well, actually only 2.5 of 5; the materials were cleaned partly as digital files (either tiff, targa, cineon or dpx) in hardware or software based tools; but the people who did this made several, partly severe errors. In numerous sequences the individual frames were moved several pixels in different directions, apparently in an effort to stabilize the picture. The result is that the letterbox is moving partly very noticeably not only in subpixel but up to 10 pixels at the top, bottom an on the right (inward)[see astronauts dialogue post plane crashlanding]; some scenes have lost detail and sharpness because of this.

The thing is: it was not even necessary - from older masters that were not cleaned it is very plain that no significant damage is evident on the 35mm element. There is camera movement, though; but who in their right mind would stabilize a handheld camera in a classic film ?

Also, I detected artifacts at the top letterbox in another sequence, most likely stemming from an automatic cleanup tool [arrival of Elliot Gould with Karen Black in red sportscar at her house]. The main reason why I gave this low rating is that all this could and SHOULD have been detected during the QC (quality control/check). Regardless whether older film or new, the (very high) standard should be challenge and clearly defined goal. After all, it is called High Definition for a good reason. All cleanup / restoration work is much harder - and more expensive. But better a more expensive Blu-ray with a properly made transfer and mastering then a discounted disc with a mediocre or - heaven forbid - a butcher's job.

The check I made was done via a profesionally calibrated and maintained SONY VW-VPL100 True-HD 1920x1080 Projector/on a 3,10m professional DaVision Screen/sound via ONKYO TX-NR905.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2014
This is a great movie. Its a mystery, a thriller and a good tale with well drawn characters. There is humour, action and adventure.

The disc is rather disappointing and not up to ITV Studios' usual standards. Although by no means a disaster like the DVDs (which were panned and scanned) the print never really pops and in places looks like an upscale of SD material. OK, its the best its yet looked on home video but it could and should be better, I hope someone like Shout Factory get a hold of it. It deserves better.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 11 March 2002
The rocket is on the launch pad. The astronauts have just strapped themselves in. Suddenly there is a tap on the window and the three men (James Brolin, Sam Waterston and O.J. Simpson) have become pawns in one of the most improbable conspiracies ever invented. Ushered out of the space capsule and flown to a remote military base in the desert, they are forced against their will to co-operate in a desperate plan to fake the first manned mission to Mars. The motive: Congress is looking for an excuse to cut NASA's funding, and an aborted mission, caused by the last-minute discovery of a faulty life-support system, would be all the excuse they need. So the mission must go ahead, or appear to go ahead, at all costs. All goes well until the capsule's heat shield disintegrates on re-entry to Earth and the capsule burns up in the atmosphere, leaving millions of people with the idea that the astronauts are dead. NASA cannot afford to have them around anymore....
Sounds silly eh? Well, essentially it is, but director Peter Hyams takes this silly idea and runs with it with such flair and energy that, disbelief suspended, the audience is taken on one of the most entertaining journeys of the 70s. Everything works together so well: the sardonically witty dialogue, the arresting visuals, the exhilarating stunts, all linked by Jerry Goldsmith's brilliantly atmospheric music. Never mind that the plot is full of holes, this is a film to watch again and again.
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