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Capitol Disco
 
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Capitol Disco

11 Jun. 2007 | Format: MP3

£12.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
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3:14
30
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3:38
30
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6:19
30
4
3:34
30
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3:27
30
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3:06
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4:00
30
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3:34
30
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4:53
30
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5:05
30
11
3:09
30
12
3:30
30
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3:11
30
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3:32
30
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5:31
30
16
3:02
Disc 2
30
1
6:45
30
2
4:07
30
3
4:09
30
4
2:55
30
5
4:06
30
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4:34
30
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4:46
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4:41
30
9
5:44
30
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4:50
30
11
4:00
30
12
4:46
30
13
3:33
30
14
4:05
30
15
5:19
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 11 Jun. 2007
  • Release Date: 11 Jun. 2007
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Mixed Repertoire
  • Copyright: 2007 Parlophone Records Ltd. This label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved. (C) 2007 Parlophone Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 2:11:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002AB7M6M
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 155,334 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 5 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
some interesting obscure songs, but lots of filler and songs that aren't even disco 22 May 2008
By Music Fan Jeff - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is a strange compilation. While I applaud anyone who brings more obscure tracks to market instead of simply reissuing the same music over and over, this compilation unfortunately is dominated by songs that deserved to be obscure when they were released -- in other words, they aren't very good. There are some good tracks hidden among the dreck here, though, such as Margo Thunder's cover of "Expressway to Your Heart" and the campy Brown Sugar track "Lay Some Lovin' On Me." It also has some other good, more familiar tracks from artists such as Minnie Riperton and Ashford & Simpson.

What's most strange about this compilation is that a lot of the tracks aren't really even disco. Many of them are straight ahead r&b tracks.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
C(r)apitol Disco 23 Oct. 2008
By Starr - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is a highly disappointing release and for these very reasons:

(a.) What's HERE is mostly obscure early 80's R&B from a label that failed to promote it's R&B acts.

(b.) What's MISSING is the "Disco" which this collection boasts that it contains.

For a label that was hardly known for its roster of Disco acts, I find it comical that the acts listed here are not even representative of that genre of music. I used to own all of the Capitol "Disco" records which beared the "Capitol Disco" stamp on the record labels themselves and whomever compiled this awful collection obviously does not know which records were "Disco" and which were NOT from the Capitol label. I'll begin with what WAS "Disco" and what songs are missing here so as to prevent others from buying this severely pointless and laughable compilation:

"Master of Love," "Love Magnet," "Happy Days Are Here Again/Happy Music (Dance the Night Away,)" "I'll Do Anything for You" and "Red Hot" by Freda Payne and "Haven't Stopped Dancin' Yet," "Just Let It Lay," "Love It (You're the One,") "No Way to Treat A Lady" or "People's Party" by Gonzalez, the latter three which were produced by Pete Bellotte (of Donna Summer fame.)

And where is "Disco Fairlyand" by Kitty and The Haywoods or Shobizz' "Do It in the Dark?" Where is Helen Reddy's ONLY BOW to Disco, "Make Love to Me," a remake of Kelly Marie's song in all of it's seven minutes of Disco glory? How about "Never Gonna Change My Mind" by Plaza, anything hitworthy (at that time) from "Dance Forever" by Cheryl Ladd (of Charlie's Angels fame), "We All Need Love" by Troiano, "Our Love Is Insane" by Desmond Child And Rouge or "Shake Your Body (It's the Joint)" by Gary Bartz (which is more of a Funk joint than it is a Disco joint, but it still qualifies as Disco having been released in 1977 as a 12" single)? Tavares isn't even shown here with ANY of their Disco hits which include "The Ghost of Love," "Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel," "More Than A Woman," "Straight from Your Heart" and/or "Don't Take Away the Music." These were all released prior to 1980 and one or two were featured on the Saturday Night Fever soundtrack, a milestone recording which epitomized the Disco sound. Where are "Shoot Your Best Shot" and "Red Light," two Disco smash hits from Linda Clifford's first Capitol/RSO/Curtom album, "I'm Yours" from 1980?

Also strange is that Capitol's ONLY platinum Disco single, "Boogie Oogie Oogie," from A Taste of Honey is passed up for "Do It Good," their 1979 single which introduced their "Another Taste" album and which didn't even chart Disco. It charted R&B instead and peaked at U.S. #13. Go figure.

Soul siren, Natalie Cole, like Reddy, attempted ONLY ONE bow to Disco with her "I Love You So" album in 1979. If anything, its title cut or an extended version of its only hit single, "Stand By" might have made more sense than "Annie Mae" which was the 2nd single from two albums prior ("Thankful," 1977) and which was straight-up R&B. "Sophisticated Lady" which is showcased here is a Funk/Rock song and it was taken from THREE albums prior ("Natalie," 1976.) Minnie Riperton (in all of her late greatness) is severely misrepresented here with "Adventures in Paradise," a Funk-Rock tune and "Baby This Love I Have," an R&B ballad. Where are HER two bows to Disco with "Young, Willing & Able" and/or "Stick Together," which were released as 12" singles from her magnificent "Stay in Love (A Romantic Fantasy Set to Music") album from 1977?

Gloria Jones is represented here with "Windstorm," which IS accurate, however she had two other Disco nuggets entitled "Bring Back the Love (Why Can't We Be Friends") and "When I Was A Little Girl," which isn't shown here at all and was similar to anything Gloria Gaynor or Thelma Houston might have recorded/released and must certainly be in the Capitol vaults. I owned IT TOO on a 12" Disco single.

Also missing in action are Nancy Wilson's "I'm Gonna Let Ya" from her "Music on My Mind" album from 1978, "Love, Life and Harmony" and "Take My Love" from her 1979 & 1980 albums of the same names. Even though Wilson attempted Disco and failed, these selections are certainly qualifiable enough to have been included here.

On another note, I wouldn't tell Frankie Beverly that he's a Disco artist by what is indicated here. "Southern Girl" is ANYTHING but a Disco song; it's a gritty and soulful Funk/Rock nugget.

It's not to say that the songs here are bad; it's just that most of them are simply NOT Disco songs. Diana Ross was NOT a Capitol artist, so it's beyond me how her abysmal workout song, "Work That Body" ended up here. She recorded this song on RCA in 1981.

"Mystic Merlin's "Sixty Thrills A Minute" as well as Donna Washington's "'Scuse Me, While I Fall in Love" and Ashford & Simpson's "Street Corner" were released respectively in 1981 and 1982. Disco ended in 1980, so I don't understand quite how the "Disco" format plays into ANY of these three selections either. Finally, and more perplexing is T-Connection's "Party Night." This was (a flop) released in 1983 which is three years after the Disco sound/format had completely waned.

For this collection and its asking price, I would save your money, pray for the day it's re-issued (and CORRECTLY with the RIGHT SONGS and not with all the filler) or just buy it more cheaply new or used if only for some of the obscure cuts that are not available (yet) on CD.

This is ANYTHING but a Disco album. Don't be fooled by the title and/or the "Disco"-ish photos on the front of the package. It's completely misleading. What titles I mention at the top of this review are the titles that Capitol is holding hostage in its vaults and that SHOULD HAVE BEEN USED here as opposed to the songs that ARE. Had this set contained any of THESE, it would have been an incredible package to own and one that I'm SURE today would be in great demand by fans of the the label's Disco output. Many of these songs are still available on vinyl and most likely will continue to be until Capitol gets with it. I'm sure that some may be available for download at a fairly reasonable price too.

Like the very fitting title of a single taken from Gonzalez' swansong Capitol album, "Watch Your Step," suggests and which is ALSO MISSING from this collection, "Disco Can't Go On Forever," HERE the Disco never got started to begin with on this poorly compiled, sadly misrepresented and laughable set, so save your money, research the REAL Capitol Disco records and download. None of the label's "Disco" catalog items except for a few that aren't even here made an impact at radio or in sales ANYWAY save for Tavares, A Taste of Honey and Gonzalez and to do so would probably not cost very much.

Again, this is NOT a Capitol Disco album. The Capitol Disco is completely MISSING and this is a sad realization for the fans (like myself) whom have been waiting with baited breath for YEARS to hear those songs in crisp, remastered form. This collection might have been retitled instead, "Capitol Doesn't Know What It's Doing As Usual."
31 disco rarities 29 Nov. 2007
By Matthew In Sydney - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The 31 disco rarities on this cd are going to please disco collectors and hard-core fans, rather than your average casual music buyer. I hadn't heard most of the songs before, but the quality is mostly very good (without reaching the heights of the greatest disco classics), and the sound quality is excellent.
There are a number of familiar 70's disco names featured - Tavares; A Taste Of Honey; Diana Ross; Natalie Cole - but again the tracks selected aren't their most famous hits.
So the strength of this compilation is that it returns to us some pretty good tracks that otherwise would be terrificly hard to get.
Listen to A Little Bit Of Love by Gentle Persuasion, Expressway To Your Heart by Margo Thunder, and the disco funk of Sixty Thrills A Minute by Mystic Merlin. With a minimum of tweaking, they sound like the kind of tracks that could be remixed and appear on current retro-dj albums by the likes of Dimitri From Paris.
So if you're a committed disco fan tired of endless compilations featuring the same old songs, this album is a treat. For everyone else, I'd only give this 2 or maybe 3 stars if I was feeling generous.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Don't Pay Attention To the Nay-Sayers...This is a VERY Solid Compilation of Lesser-Known Funky Soul Classics... 18 Jan. 2014
By prophet-5 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Yes...You guys are correct, the title of this cd is misleading. Most of these songs are NOT disco, they are funky soul/r & b, mostly from the 70's.

The title of this compilation should have been titled "Capitol Rare Soul Gems" or something like that....

I think the majority of these songs are quite good. Just because you don't know them does not mean they are not solid songs.
This is an issue with people...lack of familiarity of music sometimes makes it easy to dismiss...but in doing so, you are doing themselves a HUGE disservice!!

I am not entirely sure, but I believe that Maze's amazing electrofunk gem "Twilight" is unavailable elsewhere on cd, making this alone worth the price of admission.

The mastering is excellent as well. Very good collection of lesser-known gems from the Capitol label. I recommend it!
5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Disco on "E" 26 Sept. 2007
By David A. Scott - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'll defend disco's honor 'til the day I die, but like any underground "overnight sensation," the market eventually takes notice and then does it to death. If you want to know what that death rattle sounds like, check out this needless two-disc collection. Chances are you've heard or heard of next to nothing on this set. There's a reason why. Lowest of the lows... Diana Ross's aerobics anthem "Work that Body." It answers the question "Just how little can a star contribute to something and still stick her name on it?" Sheesh!
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