Watch now

£5.98 + £1.26 delivery
In stock. Sold by SAS MUSIC & DVDS
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Used: Good | Details
Sold by tdelectronicsuk
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Dispatched from our Guildhall store.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£5.97
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Global_Deals
Add to Basket
£5.99
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: alentertainment
Add to Basket
£11.99
+ £1.26 UK delivery
Sold by: Just4-U-Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Cape Fear [DVD]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

Cape Fear [DVD]


Price: £5.98
Only 1 left in stock.
Dispatched from and sold by SAS MUSIC & DVDS.
8 new from £5.97 8 used from £0.44 2 collectible from £6.23

Amazon Instant Video

Watch Cape Fear (1962) instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on DVD from LOVEFiLM By Post
£5.98 Only 1 left in stock. Dispatched from and sold by SAS MUSIC & DVDS.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

Cape Fear [DVD] + The Night of the Hunter [DVD] [1955] + Out Of The Past [DVD]
Price For All Three: £15.87

These items are dispatched from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Universal Dvd
  • DVD Release Date: 31 Mar. 2003
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005774K
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 71,726 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

From Amazon.co.uk

Cape Fear is a 1962 American psychological thriller film directed by Martin Scorsese and a remake of the 1962 film of the same name. It stars Robert De Niro, Nick Nolte, Jessica Lange and Juliette Lewis and features cameos from Gregory Peck, Robert Mitchum and Martin Balsam, who all appeared in the 1962 original film.Superior to Martin Scorsese's punishing 1962 remake, this 1962 thriller directed by J. Lee Thompson (The Guns of Navarone) stars Robert Mitchum as a creepy ex-con angry at the attorney (Gregory Peck) whom he believes is responsible for his incarceration. After Mitchum makes clear his plans to harm Peck's family, a fascinating game of crisscrossing ethics and morality takes place. Where the more recent version seemed trapped in its explicitness, Thompson's film accomplishes a lot with a more economical and telling use of violence. The result is a richer character study with some Hitchcockian overtones regarding the nature of guilt. --Tom Keogh

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Kona TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 May 2005
Format: DVD
The intense 1962 thriller stars Gregory Peck as Sam Bowden, a lawyer who is stalked by ex-con Max Cady (Robert Mitchum). It seems Peck withheld evidence in Cady's trial, and by doing so, helped send him to prison for years. Now Cady's out, and wants to get even by hurting Sam's wife (Polly Bergen) and daughter. They hide in a house boat moored in Cape Fear, knowing Cady will do anything to get revenge.
Gregory Peck is outstanding as the dedicated attorney and desperate family man. Mitchum is so creepy and slimy in this film you'll be breathless watching his performance, which surely is one of his best. Every ounce of him seethes with hatred and evil. Polly Bergen and Lori Martin, as the daughter, are convincingly terrified as the ex-con gets closer and closer.
This version of the film is better than the remake, thanks to the fine acting of the stars and a script that will keep you on the edge of your seat. If you like chilling movies, you'll love Cape Fear.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 12 Jan. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
J. Lee Thompson's 1962 version of Cape Fear may not be a masterpiece, but in everyway it's a superior thriller to Martin Scorsese's horribly misjudged remake. More surprisingly, it's also much nastier even with the heavier censorship of the day - Robert Mitchum's treatment of Polly Bergen in the last reel is startlingly violent and disturbing even now and its still shocking to see an early 60s film that revolves around sex crimes. There's no doubt exactly what's on Mitchum's mind, whether he's eyeing up a pickup in a bar or breaking an egg in his fist and smearing the yolk over the mother's shoulders and neck: like a lazy reptile waiting to casually catch a fly with his tongue, he merely has to look at Gregory Peck's underage daughter to exude menace. Where the remake offered a dysfunctional family forced to come together, the original offers something much more anarchic, as Gregory Peck's Mr Civil Liberties gradually comes to realize that the only way to protect his All-American family from Mitchum's strutting lizard-like vengeful ex-con is play dirty himself and plan his murder using his own daughter as bait. He may be playing another small-town southern lawyer, but he's is as far way from Atticus Finch as Mitchum's seedy, cocky but thoroughly self-aware Max Cady is from his self-deluding self-righteous `preacher' Harry Powell.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 6 Nov. 2006
Format: DVD
Sometimes, the most terrifying monsters are the ones that look just like humans.

And one such monster is at the heart of "Cape Fear," one of the most harrowing movies from Hollywood's golden age. Rather than a straightforward thriller, this movie explores how sometimes both crime and justice can go outside the law -- and how far some people will go for revenge.

Sam Bowden (Gregory Peck) sent Max Cady (Robert Mitchum) to prison for rape, eight years ago. Now Cady has been released, and is determined to settle the old score -- and Bowden's wife and teenage daughter are next. Bowden tries to get the police to help, but until Cady breaks a law, they can't do anything.

And so Cady begins his vendetta against Bowden -- he stalks Bowden's daughter and poisons the dog. He rapes a young woman, then frightens her into not telling. As Bowden's life becomes a living nightmare, he knows that he will have to go outside the law to deal with Cady -- and he'll have to set a trap.

Hitchcock would have been jealous. Not many movies -- even of his movies -- create the sense of pure evil that "Cape Fear" does. Stalking laws didn't exist back then, and so until a crime was committed and charges were pressed, the police literally could not do a thing.

And that conflict is the heart of "Cape Fear." As a lawyer, Bowden believes firmly in the justice of law at the beginning, but that is shattered when Cady uses the law for himself. J. Lee Thompson illustrates how law and justice aren't the same thing -- Cady is evil but works within the law, while Bowden must go vigilante to keep his innocent family safe.

And J. Lee Thompson does a great job creating this nightmare.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By evergreen on 14 Aug. 2013
Format: DVD
I have to say that in every respect the film is good to the point of excellent. All the actors are superb and the action and direction sew a feasible storyline and plot together admirably.
I have not given it a top ranking of five stars simply because the ending is a bit hollow despite the horror of the family's ordeal. I suppose the idea is to create a sense of awe regarding the evil spirit which might abide in some individuals, driving them to the extreme to mutilate and destroy and only the ferocity of nature itself can match such evil. Or perhaps I am being too fanciful in my conjecture. I would have liked to see the villain upended by his own sadistic desire to inflict pain and maybe some realisation by him of his villainy and even his lunacy. . perhaps too subtle .. anyway.. stories which are bound to see the goodies win often lack a final punch to make us sit up.
A major goof....should have been for the De Niro version.. sorry if I have caused any confusion.
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback