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  • Cape Fear Box Set [1961 and 1991] [DVD]
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Cape Fear Box Set [1961 and 1991] [DVD]

11 customer reviews

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Cape Fear Box Set [1961 and 1991] [DVD] + The Night of the Hunter [DVD] [1955]
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Product details

  • Actors: Robert Mitchum, Gregory Peck, Polly Bergen, Lori Martin, Martin Balsam
  • Directors: J. Lee Thompson, Martin Scorsese
  • Producers: Sy Bartlett, Barbara de Fina
  • Format: Box set, PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Universal Pictures UK
  • DVD Release Date: 8 Aug. 2003
  • Run Time: 224 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000AM74X
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 21,768 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Two versions of the same film. In the 1961 version Robert Mitchum plays the sadistic Max Cady (Robert Mitchum). Fresh out of prison Cady is determined to have his revenge on Sam Bowden (Gregory Peck), the lawyer who helped send him away. Menacing Bowden's wife and teenage daughter with obscene phonecalls and implied threats, Cady never does anything which would allow the police to arrest him, and thereby provokes Bowden to go beyond the confines of the law and engage him in direct confrontation. Famed for Mitchum's sinister performance and Bernard Herrmann's atmospheric score, 'Cape Fear' is one of the great classics of the late studio era. The 1991 version by Martin Scorcese stars Nick Nolte as Sam Bowden, Jessica Lange as his wife, Juliette Lewis as his teenage daughter and Robert De Niro as Max Cady - with Peck and Mitchum appearing in cameo roles.

From Amazon.co.uk

Cape Fear (1962)

Superior to Martin Scorsese's punishing 1991 remake, this 1962 thriller directed by J. Lee Thompson (The Guns of Navarone) stars Robert Mitchum as a creepy ex-con angry at the attorney (Gregory Peck) whom he believes is responsible for his incarceration. After Mitchum makes clear his plans to harm Peck's family, a fascinating game of crisscrossing ethics and morality takes place. Where the more recent version seemed trapped in its explicitness, Thompson's film accomplishes a lot with a more economical and telling use of violence. The result is a richer character study with some Hitchcockian overtones regarding the nature of guilt. --Tom Keogh

Cape Fear (1991)

Martin Scorsese's 1991 remake of J. Lee Thompson's 1962 thriller dabbles a bit in some fascinating psychological crosscurrents between its characters, but it finally trades in all that rich material for extensive and gratuitous violence. Robert De Niro plays a serial rapist released from prison after 14 years. Angry because his appalled attorney (Nick Nolte) made it easy for him to be convicted, this monster is out to hurt Nolte's character through his wife (Jessica Lange) and daughter (Juliette Lewis). The themes of interlocking guilt and anger between these people suggests a smart film in the making. But the final act, set on a boat with De Niro's vengeful pervert attacking Nolte and the two women, takes a more unfortunate direction. Stick with the original (which starred Robert Mitchum and Gregory Peck, each of whom make a cameo appearance in this film). --Tom Keogh

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By S J Buck TOP 500 REVIEWER on 23 July 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Both these films are worth getting, but as a double bill this becomes a great purchase. If anything the original film is the better of the two, but don't under-estimate Scorcese's remake, its a powerful film in its own right, but just a little over the top.

Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum star in the original 1961 version, and Scorcese gave them both small roles in the remake. Nick Nolte and Robert DeNiro star in the remake. DeNiro worked out seriously for this role, and although aged 49 at the time, when you watch the opening scene (the last to be filmed) you can see he was in tremendous shape. He was working out for hours every day before filming. The main difference between the two films is that in the original version the Bowden family are basically 'good' and Max Cady (Robert Mitchum) is 'evil'. In the remake this is much less clear cut, and the family have problems. Cady is also given some legal basis for being unhappy with Sam Bowden (Nick Nolte) in the remake, although this is no justification for his actions of course.

Its worth mentioning Bernard Herrmanns teriffic score which was adapted for the remake as well. If Hitchcock had had the chance he would have used this, its very sinister, with a memorable hook.

There is a bonus disc with the 1991 version. This contains a documentary, deleted scenes etc etc. The original version also has a similar number of extras as well.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Willsmer HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 12 Jan. 2008
Format: DVD
Simple question: who is the better director, Martin Scorsese or J. Lee Thompson? The answer might seem glaringly obvious, but Scorsese's often outright embarrassingly overwrought remake of Cape Fear showed that when it came to genre pictures, Scorsese wasn't even a runner up.

J. Lee Thompson's 1962 version of Cape Fear may not be a masterpiece, but in every way it's a superior thriller to Martin Scorsese's horribly misjudged remake. More surprisingly, it's also much nastier even with the heavier censorship of the day - Robert Mitchum's treatment of Polly Bergen in the last reel is startlingly violent and disturbing even now and its still shocking to see an early 60s film that revolves around sex crimes. There's no doubt exactly what's on Mitchum's mind, whether he's eyeing up a pickup in a bar or breaking an egg in his fist and smearing the yolk over the mother's shoulders and neck: like a lazy reptile waiting to casually catch a fly with his tongue, he merely has to look at Gregory Peck's underage daughter to exude menace. Where the remake offered a dysfunctional family forced to come together, the original offers something much more anarchic, as Gregory Peck's Mr Civil Liberties gradually comes to realize that the only way to protect his All-American family from Mitchum's strutting lizard-like vengeful ex-con is play dirty himself and plan his murder using his own daughter as bait. He may be playing another small-town southern lawyer, but he's is as far way from Atticus Finch as Mitchum's seedy, cocky but thoroughly self-aware Max Cady is from his self-deluding self-righteous `preacher' Harry Powell.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Throda tzen on 27 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The box set contains the original black and white 1961 movie and the 1991 remake. Both films carry a number of extras, including documentaries with the lead actors (though sadly with Mitchum notably absent in the original), production notes, a stills montage and theatrical trailers. The storyline is very close in both Sam Bowdens testimony sent Max Cady to prison for rape, years previously. Now Cady has been released, and is determined to get revenge -- and Bowden's wife and teenage daughter are next. Law abiding Bowden goes to the police for help, but until Cady breaks a law, they can't do anything.and so Bowden's life becomes a living nightmare,
However both films handle it in different ways. A case in point is the poisoning of the dog close to the beginning. In the original you hear the dog and then see it as they rush it to the vets, in the remake it is all covered by a verbal description and is far more low key as the modern version increases the tension as the film develops whilst the original maintains the same tension all the way through.
From the opening scene of the original Robert Mitchum intimidates as the villain and doesn’t relax the pace throughout the movie. Gregory Peck plays the self controlled husband pushed to desperation in an attempt to protect his family. The violence is very much portrayed through looks and gestures with some descriptive script, but visual violence is limited to the end scenes.
From the very opening credits of the remake, the swooping eagle and the droning brass section music, this is obviously a far slicker version updated for a different age, much more verbally and visually descriptive, where things aren’t simply black/white but shades of grey.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tim Kidner TOP 500 REVIEWER on 9 May 2012
Format: DVD
Like many, I'm sure, it was Marty Scorsese's 1991 heated affair with a sociopathic Robert de Niro that I saw first of these two Cape Fear's. That it turns to violent horror at the end, I found brilliant and compelling. I always like seeing Juliette Lewis, too and she plays the daughter of the lawyer Nick Nolte that De Niro terrorizes.

J Lee Thompson's black & white original is simply quite different and thank goodness for that. It has an air of stifling unease about and Robert Mitchum is equally unpleasant as de Niro, but in a more stand-offish way. This is more about character development and pace and intrigue than Scorsese's, who as I said, unashamedly lets it rip with both barrels blasting. One is firmly set in the early 1960's and the other, the 1990's and each is right for that particular period and its style and audience.

Getting this double DVD set, you obviously get both to compare and enjoy. They were both good and mighty films in their day and neither has its impact diminished now. Scorsese fans will see another ribbon to his creative and varied bow, as well as a treat for de Niro's and Mitchum fans will see him in one of his greatest ever roles and movies.
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