Candide (Dover Thrift Editions) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Candide (Dover Thrift Edi... has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Over 2 million items sold. Fast dispatch and delivery. Excellent Customer Feedback. Most items will be dispatched the same or the next working day.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Candide (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback – 1 May 1991

76 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£3.99
£0.01 £0.01
£3.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Candide (Dover Thrift Editions) + Penguin Classics Homer The Iliad
Price For Both: £11.18

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Paperback: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications Inc.; Reprinted edition edition (1 May 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486266893
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486266893
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 13.5 x 0.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (76 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 477,585 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

One of France's most celebrated citizens, Voltaire (1694–1778) is best known for his satirical novel Candide. His political treatises, which frequently put him at odds with the church and state, continue to exercise enormous influence on political theorists, philosophers, educators, and historians.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By "original_chepster" on 20 April 2003
Format: Paperback
Some satires since this could be said to be better but taking this book in perspective of when it was written and the political, scientific and religious developments, it has to be seen as one of, if not the, most original. The book applies to modern times as much as its own and is my favourite read - just as it was Frederick the Great's, King of Prussia, who said that it was the only book he knew that one could read and re-read and never become bored of it. Buy this book and enjoy the sharp wit of Voltaire, a man whose writings make modern day satrical philosophers look as sharp as a wooden spoon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Sept. 2004
Format: Library Binding
Ever since philosophers began thinking about the meaning of life, a favorite question has been "Why do bad things happen to good people?". In Voltaire's day, this issue was primarily pursued either from the perspective of faith (everything that happens is God's will and must be for Divine purpose) or of reason (What do these events mean to you, as you interpret them subjectively?). Infuriated by the reaction by some members of the church to a horrible loss of life from an earthquake in Lisbon, Voltaire wrote this hard-biting satire of the human condition to explore these questions.
Before reading further, let me share a word of caution. This book is filled with human atrocities of the most gruesome sort. Anything that you can imagine could occur in war, an Inquisition, or during piracy happens in this book. If you find such matters distressing (as many will, and more should), this book will be unpleasant reading. You should find another book to read.
The book begins as Candide is raised in the household of a minor noble family in Westphalia, where he is educated by Dr. Pangloss, a student of metaphysical questions. Pangloss believes that this is the best of all possible worlds and deeply ingrains that view into his pupil. Candide is buoyed by that thought as he encounters many setbacks in the course of the book as he travels through many parts of Europe, Turkey, and South America.
All is well for Candide until he falls in love with the Baron's daughter and is caught kissing her hand by the Baron. The Baron immediately kicks Candide out of the castle (literally on the backside), and Candide's wanderings begin. Think of this as being like expulsion from the Garden of Eden for Adam.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By jol legend @netfactorbooks on 27 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
I sometimes approach old literary classics with a degree of trepidation fearing the language may be impenetrable. Not so here, this thin book is a fast and easy read. Candide travels Europe and South America with his philosopher companions whose simplified views of the world are put to the test as they farcically lurch from one misfortune to another. The story is littered with devastating wit and satirical observations of his fellow Europeans. Candide's determination to be reunited with his long lost love continues to move him on even during a rare peaceful sojourn in "Eldorado", but when he finally reaches his goal it is not as expected although there is a hilarious compensation. No doubt there are many clever political references and riskee comments relevant to the times (Voltaire spent time in jail for his outspoken views) but the overall moral of this fable reminds me most of Coelho's "The Alchemist".
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By dogsolitude_uk on 28 April 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of the funniest, most enjoyable books I've read in a long time.

For those not familiar with the plot, it charts the travels of young Candide across Europe and South America together with his companions. Candide's innocent cheeriness is contrasted with the hard-bitten pessimism of Martin, and as they travel they are subjected to increasingly surreal, bizarre and cruel twists of fate.

Voltaire's rapier wit leaves nothing and no-one spared in the frequent satirical moments found in this wonderful work, and the translation in this edition lends itself to this erudite sense of humour perfectly. He gets digs in at the French, the English, organised religion, the Portuguese Inquisition, and manages to distil some of the most awful events in human history into a potent concotion of black comedy.

Here's hoping that one day Terry Gilliam will make a film based on this work!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 14 Sept. 2007
Format: Paperback
Ever since philosophers began thinking about the meaning of life, a favorite question has been "Why do bad things happen to good people?". In Voltaire's day, this issue was primarily pursued either from the perspective of faith (everything that happens is God's will and must be for Divine purpose) or of reason (What do these events mean to you, as you interpret them subjectively?). Infuriated by the reaction by some members of the church to a horrible loss of life from an earthquake in Lisbon, Voltaire wrote this hard-biting satire of the human condition to explore these questions.

Before reading further, let me share a word of caution. This book is filled with human atrocities of the most gruesome sort. Anything that you can imagine could occur in war, an Inquisition, or during piracy happens in this book. If you find such matters distressing (as many will, and more should), this book will be unpleasant reading. You should find another book to read.

The book begins as Candide is raised in the household of a minor noble family in Westphalia, where he is educated by Dr. Pangloss, a student of metaphysical questions. Pangloss believes that this is the best of all possible worlds and deeply ingrains that view into his pupil. Candide is buoyed by that thought as he encounters many setbacks in the course of the book as he travels through many parts of Europe, Turkey, and South America.

All is well for Candide until he falls in love with the Baron's daughter and is caught kissing her hand by the Baron. The Baron immediately kicks Candide out of the castle (literally on the backside), and Candide's wanderings begin. Think of this as being like expulsion from the Garden of Eden for Adam.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback