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Cameron on Cameron: Conversations with Dylan Jones Hardcover – 18 Aug 2008


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; First Edition edition (18 Aug. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007285361
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007285365
  • Product Dimensions: 16 x 3.2 x 22.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 387,221 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

Praise for Dylan Jones:

"Dylan Jones has had the sort of access of which most political journalists can only dream, and brings to his subject formidable writing talent, wit and wisdom. This is an important book and a must-read for anyone who wants to understand the man who would be prime minister" - Matthew d'Ancona, editor of The Spectator

"Dylan Jones is truly a polymath, a man equally at home discussing the merits of Arne Jacobsen as the appeal of David Cameron. As a writer, he has an effortless style with an erring instinct for the absurd and the noteworthy” - Simon Kelner, editor of The Independent

Review

'It gives a pretty good impression of what Cameron is actually like'

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3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By RR Waller TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Dec. 2011
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book in a charity sale because I wanted to learn more about the Prime Minister and conversations with him seemed a good approach. However, I also did a quick check on the author to determine from which direction he was writing to discover what I suspected anyway. He is an enthusiast - so that's a plus for Mr Cameron. As Leader of HM's Opposition (as he was when it was written) he was astute enough to have an enthusiast writing a major book about him. That was comforting.

The only review on the dust cover is from the Editor of "The Spectator" who thinks it is an "important book" and essential reading, a "must read". No change then.

The book is not a political tract and - in many ways - is quite light; I found that a little disappointing but it was good to see he was trying to humanise himself for those in the electorate who might read it, his intended audience rather than "political heavyweights". Not everyone has had the benefits of an Oxbridge life and its rarified air.

It does give details of social responsibility, the family unit, reforming prisons and welfare, national transport, crime, multi-culturalism and all the major issues. This is snorkelling rather than deep-sea diving but at least it wets the feet.

I did emerge with a greater appreciation of the Prime Minister but, as I watch him wrestling with one of the major issues which has damaged so many Prime Ministers, our relationship to Europse and the Eurozone, I know having the policies is all very well but, when the front door opens, there is a real world out there.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jon Stone on 12 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback
Honestly, the book is so light on politics as to be a complete unpolitical book. It's a bunch of soft focus, thrown together personal rubbish about how great a guy David Cameron is. Honestly, it is completely apolitical, irrelevant and sycophantic media coverage like this that got Cameron elected in the first place - no policy scrutiny at all. The book is like a microcosm of the media in the run up to the general election.

Also, as another review mentioned below, Google searching Dylan Jones shows that the author is a bit of a David Cameron fanboy, apparently out to spoon-feed him to the the British public.

Honestly, the only reason I finished the book was because I hate leaving things half done. I wouldn't even bother picking it up, if I were you.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ian Shine VINE VOICE on 22 Aug. 2009
Format: Hardcover
Prior to reading this book I viewed Cameron as a somewhat shallow politician, lacking in policy ideas and likely to become the next PM purely through dint of Gordon Brown and the Labour party's unpopularity.
I can't say that this book massively changed my view on the last of these points, but it has changed my view on the others.
Cameron's main policy ideas - social responsibility, strengthening the family unit, reforming prisons and welfare - are all in this book, even if they're not detailed massively. He puts strong emphasis on the family, saying it is the root of our social problems, and that he believes in offering incentives for families to stay together (as recently detailed in Iain Duncan Smith's proposals regarding a three month probation period prior to divorce) rather than simply imposing a piece of legislation, such as ASBOs, in an attempt to reduce youth disaffection, knife crime and gun crime.
He also gets onto prison reform, but doesn't really enlighten us as to how he plans to reform prisons, preferring instead to lay into Brown and Blair's prison system.
Other areas touched on are Britain's transport infrastructure, immigration and multi-culturalism (which Cameron believes need reigning in), Europe and the rich-poor divide (which Cameron, somewhat unrealistically, believes can be reduced by helping those at the bottom to better themselves, while leaving the rich alone to get on with getting richer).
While there is some straight-talking here, the author Dylan Jones is very much a paid up Conservative, and doesn't grill Cameron as thoroughly as an independent journalist would.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By E. Plant on 6 Feb. 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I just finished this book and, on the whole, enjoyed it. I thought the question and answer sessions, where Cameron explains out his liberal Conservative philosophy and plans for social reform, as well as some other trivia, were interesting.

On the other hand, Dylan Jones was unabashedly sycophantic, increasingly so towards the end when (because?) Cameron is ahead in the polls. So I enjoyed hearing from David Cameron, but not so much the author of this book!
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