Buy Used
£1.91
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Tree Savers
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A used book that is in a good, clean condition. Your item will be picked, packed and posted FREE to you within the UK by Amazon, also eligible for free Super Saver delivery.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Cambodia (Lonely Planet Country Guides) Paperback – 1 Aug 2005


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, 1 Aug 2005
£23.10 £0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:



Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 5th Revised edition edition (1 Aug 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1740595254
  • ISBN-13: 978-1740595254
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 12.7 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 830,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Nobody covers the world like Lonely Planet.' --New York Post, May 2004

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Jonny Lewington on 26 April 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Firstly - the strengths of the book. As with most Lonely Planet guides, it does provide a reasonable guide to the major areas, paticuarly Phnom Penh and Siem Riep. I stayed in a number of recommended guest houses and found them to be pretty decent and the maps, transport guides, saftey advice etc. mean that this book is probably advisable for people traveling to Cambodia for the first time.

However, many travellers in Asia who I've met have commented that 'there didn't seem like there was much to do in Cambodia apart from Siem Reap and Phnom Penh', and this (I believe) is probably a result of 'lonely planet syndrome'. Beyond these two destinations (and a few on the coast near phnom penh, the book treats the rest of the country very briefly, which may leave the impression that these areas aren't worht visiting. Evidently, this is because these areas simply are not touristy - and is what you'd expect from a guidebook like this (so no discrdit whatsoever to the author). But, all I'd say is don't let this put you off. I spent three months travelling the country, largely following reccomendations from locals as I went, and found many areas barely mentioned in the book but which were more than worth exploring. For example, a highlight of my trip was a trek in Botum Sakor national park, an outstandingly beautiful (and large) national park which isn't even mentioned at all in the guide (as far as I can tell). Cambodia has a huge amount to offer any traveller - you could easily spend years exploring the country - so please (please) don't flick through the lonely planet and decide its only worth a few days.

The other main problem is that Cambodia is a rapidly changing country and as such even a one month old guide would probably be out of date.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
57 of 61 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 Jan 2002
Format: Paperback
The guide book is useful, interesting and really helps you make the most of your time in Cambodia. I wouldn't have seen half of the amazing places if I hadn't taken it with me. The information in it is accurate despite what the local taxi drivers may say!! Stand your ground!! There is no need to buy any extra guide books when you're there either - all of their information is included in this one.
The only thing the book doesn't prepare you for is the random overpricing that has occurred, the variation from shop to shop is immense. Shop where the locals shop and you'll save a fortune.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 April 2001
Format: Paperback
Lively and deeply informative commentary for independent travellers like me who prefer to get away from the usual tourist crowds. Includes all the information you need about this fascinating country - political history, religion, safety and those offbeat excursions (plus where to get your hands on deep fried spider. Lovely)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Chris Hoare TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 6 Sep 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I really think that travel guides as Kindle (or other ebooks) are the future; the Lonely Planet guide makes an excellent kindle book when you are travelling - for a start the kindle much smaller and lighter than the paper books itself - and you can get dozens on the device. I recently planned a trip through Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam on the one device. I only had a few days in each country so hit the highlights rather than tried for any remote or more detailed places.

The writing in LP Cambodia is easy to follow and there is a great history section to read before you go to help you get the feel for the place. One big benefit is that on the kindle edition you can see popular bookmarks and notes from other users should they choose toshare them; that turns it into the guidebook that has peer review before you go. The search facility and bookmarking / notes are invaluable as they help you find that museum in Phnom Penn that you were interested in visiting and just make it easier to tag places to visit or visited as you go; or you can use the search to finding a restaurant in Siem Reap. One negative is the maps are harder to use on the Kindle than other visitors paper copies.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By The Guardian TOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 22 Mar 2012
Format: Paperback
The LP guides are consistently the best overall for the independent traveller, though some of the Rough Guides run them close; both have straightforward practical information about getting around. Although Cambodia is modernising fast, it's still undeveloped compared to almost everywhere else in SE Asia.

Nick Ray has lived in Cambodia for years and knows the country from a westerner's perspective. He has written or contributed to all the LP guides to Cambodia. In this edition the usual LP layout is followed with introductory sections on `getting started', when to go (just avoid the killer months of April-May before the rains), suggested itineraries, Cambodian history and a basic local language section to learn some Khmer which will go down well if you get it right (but is more likely to induce good-humored hilarity if you don't).

The different regions of Cambodia are then described in long, dedicated chapters, with more than half the book devoted to Phnom Penh and the Angkor temples/Siem Reap - the main reason most travellers will go to Cambodia.

Most visitors arrive in Phnom Penh or Siem Reap by air. If you've come from somewhere like Thailand then the squalor, poverty and difficulties most Cambodians face every day can be quite a shock. Thousands of people have limb amputations from land mines, which still litter whole regions of the country from the Khmer Rouge days. Highlights in PP are the Killing Fields museum with graphic gruesome details you'd never see in any sanitised museum in the west; the Royal Palace and Silver Pagoda (you must wear long sleeves or will be denied entry, and note the sign at the main entrance advising you must deposit all your weapons and explosives with Reception for the duration of your tour!).
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback