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Call Me by Your Name Paperback – 22 Jan 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Picador USA; Reprint edition (22 Jan 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 031242678X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312426781
  • Product Dimensions: 13.7 x 1.8 x 20.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 745,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

"* 'Quite simply, brilliant... An effortless and unaffected erudition; a brutal, rigorous mastery of language... This is an elegy, a celebration, a meditation on the truth of passion that is nuanced and universal. It is a tremendous debut.' Francesca Segal, Observer * 'An extraordinary debut... Evocative, poetic and deeply beautiful... will strike an exquisite chord with those falling in love for the first time (or out of love for the last time) this summer.' - Tatler * 'Call Me By Your Name is a beautiful and wise book, written with both lightness and concentrated care for the precise truth of every moment in its drama... this is a miracle.' - Colm Toibin * 'Brave, acute, elated, naked, brutal, tender, humane and beautiful... If you can't handle the violence of regret the novel will awaken in you, or the agony of remembering wanting someone more than you wanted anything in your life, or the exquisite suffering that comes with the gain, and loss, of something that neared perfect understanding, then don't read this book... Otherwise, open the cover and let Aciman pull the pin from the grenade.' - Nicole Krauss * 'An exceptionally beautiful book... A first novel that abounds in moments of emotional and physical abandon... As much a story of paradise found as it is of paradise lost... Exquisite... Extraordinary.' - Stacey D'Erasmo, New York Times * 'The most exciting new fiction writer of the 21st century. Few novels since Proust's In Search of Lost Time are this adept at capturing the nuances of human emotion.' - Diana Fuss, New York Magazine" --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Andre Aciman teaches comparative literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He lives with his family in Manhattan. This is his first novel. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By N Foster on 5 Mar 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of the most remarkable, most beautiful and most harrowing books I have ever read. It should be prescribed reading for any would-be writer. No. Hold the 'would-be'. It deals with the brief, intense love affair between a seventeen year-old, highly precocious youth and a twenty five year old, fairly experienced man. In many ways it is a modern take on the Classical Greek ideal, Athens rather than Sparta. But it can't be categorised as a 'Gay' novel, any more than Cavafy is only a 'gay' poet. Homophobes will undoubtedly hate it, if only because it posits a natural state of bi-sexuality. . . and underlines that a same-sex relationship can be, is often far more, as emotionally and intellectually rewarding as a heterosexual one, albeit very different and carrying within it the seeds of its own, natural destruction. Yet the novel is not political in any sense, nor preachy. It is dramatic, will take your emotions on a ride you'll never forget. It is beautifully, beautifully written and without any of that smug, look-at-me cleverness of so many British and American novelists. I am a writer. I would give my eye-teeth to write a closing paragraph half as good as the one in this book. I have found myself reading passages aloud. Andre Aciman is some kind of genius: my kind and I so hope your as well.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Kwok on 30 Sep 2008
Format: Paperback
Andre Aciman, a noted essayist and City University of New York professor of comparative literature, has written one of the most memorable debut novels published this year, "Call Me by Your Name", ranking alongside Eugene Drucker's "The Savior" for its emotional intensity, as well as its high literary quality. It's a truly memorable coming-of-age story about an adolescent Italian Jewish man, Elio, who learns a lot about love and total intimacy from a visiting American professor, Oliver, during a brief six week period one summer, set, sometime, in Italy, back in the 1970s or 1980s. Aciman offers us an honest, unflinching portrait of total intimacy, showing how these two men gradually move from mere friendship to an all too brief, but intense, romantic encounter, in a small town on the Italian Riviera, and then later, one night, in Rome, shortly before Oliver flies back home. It is an encounter that will truly haunt both men for the rest of their lives, as depicted in occasional scenes that jump forward to the present day. Aciman's portrait is truly compelling, and one that I found impossible to put down (No wonder why it has been considered for prominent literary awards, such as the American Academy of Arts and Letters' Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction.); Aciman is not only a fine literary stylist, but a compelling storyteller too. Without question, his fine novel deserves ample consideration, not only from those familiar with his excellent nonfiction prose, but also from others, such as yours truly, who are not fully acquainted with his work.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Son of Nietzsche on 27 Mar 2007
Format: Hardcover
Set in a small town in Italy, this moving novel captures a meaningful summer in the life of Elio, a 17 year old male. Elio's homelife is relaxed; his intelligent, apparently liberal, parents have a constant flow of relatives and interesting visitors breezing in and out of their house for meals and animated conversation. The downside, as far as Elio is concerned, is that no one seeks his opinion - he is "the youngest at the table and the least likely to be listened to". Each summer, Elio's father invites a young academic to stay at their summer home on the Italian Riviera. Fearing the typical "dull house guest", Elio is immediately captivated when the confident, handsome, 24 year old Oliver strolls into his home, and his life. For the first few weeks of Oliver's stay, Elio fantasises about Oliver, and becomes involved with mind games and nuances. But are they all in his imagination, or is Oliver also involved in the game?

The novel is tautly crafted and so evocative of the environment that the reader can vividly sense the undercurrent of tense sideways glances against the backdrop of hazy heat and salt-speckled sea breeze. Undoubtedly some issues remain unresolved, such as the peculiar absence of jealousy felt by Elio ("It never bothered me to think of him [sleeping with a girl]"), or any explanation as to why Elio feels that a relationship with Oliver would be in some sense 'wrong'. Further, Elio's 'voice' often sounds younger than his stated 17 years, and the novel might have held more powerful authenticity if Elio had been, for example, 13 or 14 years old. Nevertheless, under this author's expert craftsmanship, such queries are largely insignificant and all form part of the three-dimensional nature of the characters.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mark Richards on 16 July 2009
Format: Paperback
This wonderful novel by Andre Aciman is so moving and powerful, it brought out every emotion in me as I read. I could not put the book down, wanting to find out how the two main characters and their relationship developed. For me, a special moment is when Elio, the 17 year-old main character's father tells him, "You had a beautiful friendship...", (referring to his relationship with Oliver) "Maybe more than a friendship... most parents would hope the whole thing goes away... remember, our hearts and our bodies are given to us only once." By the end of book I was moved to tears and I can't stop thinking about the story and what might have been for the two characters Elio and Oliver.
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